21

TL;DR warning. Sharpening is a deep and broad subject, with a lot of opinion and personal preference interspersed with the facts and science so be prepared to have to make your own mind up, i.e. choose your reality and stick with it! I don't think I missed an explanation as to why he chose to put that bevel beyond personal preference. Paul Sellers does ...


21

Obviously both of those cases are quite severe examples of edge damage, but even for single chips smaller than this re-grinding the bevel manually can be challenging. This level of edge repair is generally considered a job for power grinding. It is possible manually, I've done it entirely by hand on 'rescue chisels' using a combination of diamond plates ...


15

A 12" miter saw blade of the ilk normally found on a miter saw or cut-off saw looks like this: The teeth on the saw blade are carbide material that is very hard. You will not want to take a file to those teeth as they will very quickly kill your file. This type of saw blade has gained huge popularity in recent years because the hardness of the carbide ...


14

Things that I've heard can be used: mineral oil, vegetable oil, 3-in-1 oil, ATF, kerosene. Yes these can all be used. ATF should be avoided as it can contain ingredients you don't want on your skin, and there are many reliably safe alternatives. Mineral oils Commercial honing oils are nine times out of ten just mineral oil (UK: paraffin oil or liquid ...


12

Sharpening is a lot trickier than one would expect. In order to have a sharp blade you need to have two polished sides meeting one another: the back of the plane iron (or chisel) and the bevel. A couple of tips really helped me as I was sharpening. Sharpen up to 8000 grit. I used to have harbor freight stones and they only went up to 1000 grit--not nearly ...


11

I have never sharpened my router bits (they are all the nice ones with the carbide cutters). However, pitch will develop on them after some use. I just use a bit cleaning solution I got from Woodcraft (I am sure you can use cheaper alternatives with the same result) and a brass brush to clean the pitch off. Make sure you use a brass brush and not a steel ...


11

The differing properties of vegetable-tanned hide over chromium-tanned is an interesting subject to read up on but I think it should be stressed here that a preference for one over the other for strops can be considered irrelevant, for multiple reasons. Traditionalists often consider this a heresy and heated debates arise over it (particularly on straight-...


10

Stop! Please don't use that stuff on your tools, it's far too coarse. 300 and 600 grit is most certainly not suitable for sharpening a planer blade or such. 300 grit is very aggressive, it takes away a lot of material and not in a very smooth (sharp) way. This is something you might use on an garden axe after you've chopped through roots and earth (and ...


10

bench grinder is what I thought was the standard sharpening tool. A bench grinder is considered a coarse tool when it comes to sharpening fine woodworking implements. The only time you should need to use a bench grinder on a chisel is to re-establish a chisel edge that has been badly mangled or chipped from misuse. A factory-ground chisel should not need ...


9

Sharpening bits after every use sounds like a really bad advice. Not only is the router bit getting smaller every time (no joke!), so eventually you will notice that this 6mm plywood that you're trying to stick into the 6mm groove made with your 6mm dado bit wont't fit for some weird reason. Also you may eventually notice that those identical pieces that ...


9

Tl;DR Let me begin this answer with the final conclusion: all sharpening systems work. Just pick one and live with it because none of them are any fun. I use a set of Arkansas oil stones from Dan’s Whetstones and use the Veritas honing guide. I’m slowly trying to learn to do this freehand and wean myself from the honing guide. In addition to the stones,...


9

"Fine" and "extra fine" seem to be defined differently for every manufacturer or medium This is partly because each term from Extra Coarse to Ultra Fine represents a range of grits. I'm not certain whether 600-grit diamond is really equivalent to 600-grit wet/dry sandpaper on a surface plate and how either compares to any of the natural stones ...


9

So is all the very fine grit count paper actually wet/dry sandpaper? No. You can get regular papers that go to 400, 600 and even 800 grit (or equivalents). But as a broad generalisation if you see paper that's dark grey, with dark backing paper, it'll be the wet-and-dry type even if it doesn't specifically call itself that. Is wet/dry just a gimmick of ...


9

I am trying to figure out if there are any differences between the two that would make me want to choose one over the other. Or perhaps it just boils down to price and opinion in which case the answer would be something along it doesn't matter. Yes, it mostly boils down to price. The continuous-surface diamond plates tend to be significantly more expensive ...


9

I don't think you can sharpen a Forstner bit accurately enough with abrasive paper. Even if you glue it to a small slips of wood to make rudimentary files from it these won't be particularly stiff so may not give you the accuracy you'd want to properly sharpen a bit, where as much as possible you want to maintain the existing geometry of the factory grind. ...


9

In order to do this without gaining the experience to be able to assess what grit would be a good start, you would have to (I think this is why people are saying you really have to judge it.): Use a microscope to see the amount of metal that needs to be removed Know the "depth of cut" of different grade abrasives Choose the grade of abrasive that would cut ...


8

Here is another method from the always-interesting Mathias Wandel. Mathias's jig


8

I have to admit to being a bit lost as to what grades of abrasive exist in what media Being a bit unsure of what equates to what is commonplace and even outright confusion is understandable because you can't trust comparative grit guides. Even doing a cursory investigation into abrasive stone comparison charts you should find some inconsistencies. You ...


8

I use Norton Sharpening Stone Oil for my oilstones. If you take a look at the product description, they say it's 100% food-safe mineral oil. It seems a little less viscous than the mineral oil I use for cutting boards, which makes sense since they claim to refine it a little. Otherwise, you can use most oils for honing. I'd avoid anything that is too ...


8

I am trying to figure out if there are any differences between the two that would make me want to choose one over the other. There is really only one significant difference I can see between the two examples you posted. The diamond plates in your first example are solid plates with a consistent diamond grit across the entire surface. I own one of these ...


8

TL;DR warning. Bench grinder, tool sharpener or sharpening stone? Yes :-) All of those are suitable tools for sharpening woodworking equipment, from chisels to plane irons to drill bits (certain types). Note on sharpening bits: most woodworkers don't sharpen their drill bits these days. Partly this is because many won't dull their bits noticeably in ...


8

If I have a stone what characteristics or tests can I use to determine what kind of stone it is. There are no real tests you can do to determine the kind of stone, although you can get a practical appreciation for how it works — fine cutting or not, produces a scratchy or smooth or polished surface, how fast it cuts. Cutting speed is not always directly ...


8

Many videos and tutorials from the much respected internet woodworkers show them always going from a coarse medium through to a fine. I think there are three key things here. With respect to a few of them, the category "Internet woodworker" does not in general mean you're getting info from the best and most experienced craftsmen. Always worth bearing that ...


8

In terms of the cleanliness of the plates, I think you're worrying about nothing. Most people's plates are a bit grey, and not a few are tinged with rust from the same level of steel residue rusting sightly (reasonably common if the user is using a waterbased honing fluid or plain water). Neither seem to affect the way the plates work, it's primarily an ...


7

The most important part of sharpening a tool is knowing where to remove the material from to restore the edge. On wipedia's grind page there is a description of the most common ways to put an edge to a blade. A chisel, for example, will most often have #4; a flat surface on one side and a angled face ground off. To sharpen this you need to remove material ...


7

This will deal with sharpening a flat scraper. Curved scrapers follow the same principle, but I don't personally have any experience with them. First, you need to flatten the edge. I sandwich the scraper between two pieces of wood in my vise with perhaps 1/2" of the edge standing proud. Use a mill bastard file that is 2-3" longer than your scraper, and ...


7

You mention that you have a sharpening stone. One improvement might also be to make an angled guard that you run atop the stone that helps to impart the proper chisel angle. Something like the below might help to ensure you get a razor-sharp edge at the proper angle.


7

When polishing metals, it is quite common to use very fine grit (high grit count) sandpaper. I use it frequently. It's also recommended to use up to 1500 grit sandpaper when preparing certain wood surfaces prior to oiling with certain products – I did it recently with some Oregon when using a citrus oil and it was smooth as a baby's bottom afterwards (and it ...


7

It seems the other answers so far have all been hobbyists who use their diamond stones occasionally, which is fine (though I may be wrong!), but I can speak from the perspective of using these stones in a commercial environment: I work for a joinery shop with ~15 full time joiners. For our sharpening needs we have a Tormek grinding/honing wheel, plus a set ...


7

It all depends. I use my bench grinder to sharpen some of my wood-turning chisels and I use a stone for others. One thing to be aware of with a bench grinder is for flat chisels it will leave a concave 'hole' in the face, since you are using a round object, the bigger the wheel the smaller the concavity. Large sharpening stones on farms were big enough ...


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