43

Ashler's answer is the simplest and cheapest way to get holes the same depth. But as an extra there are bit collars that can be put on the bits which will enforce exact depth stops.


38

A lot of people drill a hole through a suitable length of wood dowel (or small square cross section) and use that as a stop-collar on the drill. Example You can also just use an external chunk of wood Example One benefit of both these is you don't need an Allen key and can very quickly swap back and forth between two or more different depths (useful for ...


27

One obvious solution is not letting the saw do anything that you don't want it to do by using a guide. In the easiest case, the fingers of your left hand are the guide, much like a professional chef would handle a knife, except one normally uses the thumb's nail for that with a saw. Alternatively, you can simply fasten a straight piece of wood with a screw ...


27

One very important step in using a hand saw is not to force the saw. You shouldn't be trying to force the saw through the wood. The cutting blades are sharp. Once you have a groove started, ease up on the saw and let the teeth do the work for you. Sure, it takes a bit longer at first, but you are rewarded with straighter cuts with cleaner ends. Secondly,...


27

The simplest means is to place a tab of masking tape on the drill bit at the desired depth. When the spinning tab lowers to the surface of the wood and sweeps away the wood chips, stop.


24

I am no pro but here's my tip. I mark the four sides and give a 2mm deep cut on the four sides. This way when starting cut on the top the blade tends to stay aligned with the previous cuts. I've been pretty much successful with this method. Drawings are better than words:


24

It has to do with the rotation of the bit. In a normal cut, the work piece is fed against the rotation. A normal cut works like this (shown for freehand): The cutting action will pull the work piece into the bit. The other cut, is known as a climbing cut. It pushes the work piece away from the bit. A climbing cut will have less tear out, but requires ...


23

How can I cut a large circle out of a 4x8 sheet of plywood? You sound like the perfect candidate for a router circle jig. The one linked is available at Rockler, but they are easy enough to make yourself out of plywood. The preferred method would be one that doesn't leave any holes/marks in the plywood surface. The one pictured uses a pin to keep the ...


21

You can also adjust your drill press table to be at the desired depth when the drill reaches the end of it's stroke.


20

Depth of cut tends to be one of the most important aspects to using a router that is often overlooked. Generally speaking, you're better off taking very thin cuts when using a router. This allows for consistent feed speeds without bogging down the router bit speed. If you're working with woods of varying density (ie. knots in the wood) then you'll want ...


19

If you call up Freud and ask, they'll tell you that you want one full tooth to clear the top of the wood, but no more. There are a couple of reasons for that recommendation- first is safety. A tooth that clears the surface on the up swing then re-enters on the down swing may not follow the same planar path due to harmonics and vibration related physics. A ...


19

There's two ways that immediately pop to mind- one involves spending a significant amount of money, the other a significant amount of time. You can buy replacement miter gauges for most table saws (e.g. Incra) that are very very accurate. Couple that with a good tune-up, and you'll be cutting perfect miters in no time. However, the other option is to make ...


18

Tape is what I would have suggested and continue to use but if you wanted something a little more robust my suggestion would be depth stop collars /nuts Image from AliExpress Easily removed off the bits and adjustable as well which tape would not be as much.


15

I am a beginner myself with hand sawing, but the following tips worked for me for straighter saw cuts: Mark your cuts either with a pencil or marking knife or both. This allows you to see if you follow the line. The added benefit of using a marking knife is that it severes wood fibres, so there is less tearing or splintering on the exit side. Do not force ...


14

Just to get it out of the way, this is the conventional/traditional wood screw: In the past it would always have been flat-head (now also called slot-head), and as a result when making a piece in a traditional style many woodworkers will insist on using flat-head screws so they look the part. Are there specific types of screws I should use for ...


13

Bear in mind that that 99 lbs is for a single joint with pressure being applied in the manner of a first class lever in Mr. Wandel's experiment. You will have multiple pocket holes in a given construction. Let's look at your table example. Most of that pressure is being distributed through the legs and into the floor, say you have four legs and four boards ...


13

The lines look very defined. How might the mask / template been made? The mask could have been cut from a purpose-made masking material as used by airbrush artists, called frisket. But any self-adhesive plastic film can be used similarly. Adhesive vinyl is often used for this sort of thing today. The advantage of frisket is that it is extremely thin and ...


13

I am designing a home theater that will have a small "stage" which will need to have a long (~8ft) piece of wood that is bowed slightly. I want to know what types of wood (e.g. MDF, certain plywoods, ect...) would be suitable for this task as I need to be able to bend the wood to shape. I would say it should be around 6" wide at most. I think MDF or a ...


12

Sharpening is a lot trickier than one would expect. In order to have a sharp blade you need to have two polished sides meeting one another: the back of the plane iron (or chisel) and the bevel. A couple of tips really helped me as I was sharpening. Sharpen up to 8000 grit. I used to have harbor freight stones and they only went up to 1000 grit--not nearly ...


12

For something that large, I would want more than just a glue joint holding it together. I would want some sort of mechanical connection between the sides and top/bottom, such as slip tenons, dowels, or mortise and tenon. If you want the look of a mitered corner, I'd suggest going with mitered half laps. The glue area is much larger, and you can pin the ...


12

For cuts with a router, slow also can mean burnt material. If I have a complex profile to cut, I either break it into multiple passes with multiple bits, or I sneak up on it, going slightly deeper each pass. Some folks also make a deep pass at close to the final depth, then make another shallow, fast pass at final depth to finish up the cut. e.g.


12

As I understand it poly varnish requires some minor abrasion between coats for good adhesion. Nope. You'll read this online a lot (and in some books, and what's worse even in the instructions for some products) but it is completely untrue. The only reason to sand between coats is if you need to 'de-nib', or remove minor surface blemishes. The important ...


12

Plexiglass works well with a craft knife too. If you score it a couple of times with a straight rule, it should snap cleanly along the break.


12

Rust removal basically falls into three camps: abrasive, chemical and electrical. Many people use a little of two of these, for example by abrading most of the rust away and then using certain polishes which have some chemical action in addition to the fine abrasive particles that physically polish the metal. An additional point, it's worth degreasing (...


12

The usual way to do this I think would be to use the correct bit in a router, but it could also be done using a suitable cutter chucked up in a drill. If using a drill ideally it will be in a drill stand for accuracy and repeatability, or a drill press will be used. Round-nosed router bit: [Source] 'Rotary file' or burr for drills: [Source] It's a ...


12

You are, indeed, using your radial arm saw correctly, but it's important to note the critical differences between the two tools. In both cases, you would be making a climb cut when pulling the blade toward you. A climb cut is generally less safe because the blade literally tries to "climb" over the wood as it pulls itself into and over the wood. If you ...


12

If you want to make joins using only wooden parts, and no metal hardware, and no glue, there are many types of joint you could use. On larger pieces of furniture, such as tables, woodworkers sometimes use a tusked tenon. You can dissassemble by knocking out the wedge. On small pieces you could try dowels. Without glue you would need to take care otherwise ...


11

I have had a good read on this and the best intro I could find comes from Fine WoodWorking Spalting wood is a lot like growing plants. With the right amounts of food, water, and heat, you should end up with good results, but success is by no means guaranteed Which wood? Elitists in spalting don't have a consensus on what wood are good for spalting. Some ...


11

Should splines be good enough or is there something better I should consider or maybe something to do in conjunction with that. Just a bit on the terminology, a true spline runs lengthways in a slot milled into the face of both mitres, through all or most of the joint (a through spline or stopped spline respectively). A different joint reinforcement, where ...


11

For strength, a good glue bond is all you need. If you want to minimize clamping, you could use pocket screws, but I would recommend against it. When you tighten a pocket screw, it tends to pull the boards slightly out of alignment unless you first have the boards well clamped, and if you already have them clamped, why bother with the pocket hole screws? ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible