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24

Keyed chucks still get a better grip on any bit. I'm willing to use keyless on my portable drill -- though mine will take a key too, and there are times when I use it. I wouldn't trust keyless on a drill press.


24

It does matter - wood drill bits won't work on metal (destroying the bit in the process, unless used on thin and soft metals) and metal drill bits will increase splintering and tear-out when used on wood (but this depends also on the wood type and the diameter of the bit, and for smaller diameters there is little difference between wood and metal drills bits)...


16

a Swanson speed square has a lip on one side that makes it really good for quickly drawing a perpendicular line on a work piece A try square is similar in that respect: the handle is thicker than the blade, so it's easy to push the inside of the handle up against the edge of a board and mark (or verify) a line perpendicular (square) to the edge. And you can ...


15

As @keshlam pointed out. My drill presses both have keyed chucks and it allows much greater torque to put a stronger clamp on the bit. This is really important for larger bits when you get over 1 1/2" say for keyhole saws or large Forstner bits. There can be a lot of resistance and I don't think most keyless chucks can do the job. Even there I've had a ...


13

You have there what's called a saw jointer. The one below is very similar. The site linked as the source says it's similar to a Stearn's model, so that might be what you have. (source) These are used to joint (flatten) the teeth of a hand saw to one level. After jointing, one would then sharpen each individual tooth such that the points are now at the ...


12

Currently Saber Saw and Jigsaw refer to the same tool. My Dad always called the top item a Saber Saw. Up through the 1980's, the hand held tool was referred to as a Saber Saw in Popular Mechanics, but was called a Jigsaw by the manufacturers. The name Jigsaw predates hand held tools by about 100 years. It then referred to what we now call a scroll saw. ...


12

When discussing tools, there is a spectrum ranging from construction tools (good enough for framing a house but not necessarily precision instruments) to machinist tools (which are typically highly precise). Woodworking tools fall somewhere in between. A try square like the one pictured in your question is great for scribing or drawing 90 degree lines, but ...


12

I'm not that familiar with new-build tools but that looked naggingly familiar and I was relatively sure it was for a saw and not any sort of plane. This made it easy to track down: [Veritas dovetail saw] Edit: it looks like the handle is common to their tenon saw as well even though it features a slightly different means of attachment: [Veritas tenon saw]


12

Hollow auger U.S. Patent 203,384 is for a "Hollow auger" or more specifically for improvements to a hollow auger. "What's a hollow auger?" you ask. Well, as @Keshlam suggested it is a device for cutting tenons on chair rungs or spokes as demonstrated by a similar device on a You Tube video. It's a device that, rather than drilling a hole, it drills what ...


9

The holes in a workbench skirt are usually used for pegs. They're used to prop one end of a long board up while the other end is clamped in a vise or held to the face of the bench with a clamp or holdfast. For the Nicholson-style workbench pictured above, usually one would jam the end of a board (oriented vertically) into the crow's mouth on the left and ...


9

Despite the difficulties of the link, I think it is referring to the Rockwell hardness scale. The Rockwell scale is a hardness scale based on indentation hardness of a material. The Rockwell test determines the hardness by measuring the depth of penetration of an indenter under a large load compared to the penetration made by a preload.1 There are ...


8

I don't know how "pretty" it needs to be when its done but rough cuts can easily be done with a chainsaw or a reciprocating saw with a long enough blade. A quick search shows blades that are 10" long which might be enough for the reciprocating saw. A 12" pruning blade like this bad boy from Amazon for example. Might not be the best example but as long as ...


8

That's a push drill, sometimes referred to as a "Yankee drill". It has the advantage of working in some places where you can't fit a crank or brace-and-bit.


8

For this gauge, I would imaging that you scribe with both beams individually instead of scribing with both points active at the same time. So, if you're setting up the inside cheek of the mortise, you scribe with the shorter beam. Then rotate the tool slightly and scribe the outside cheek with the longer beam. This is a similar system to the Veritas Dual ...


8

It is an antique Beech Wood & Brass Sash template. In short they were/are used as a template for creating (miter/coping) the framing around windows where glaze is used. You can read more here. http://hackneytools.com/2013/08/how-to-use-sash-templates-or-templets/


7

What I want to know is how to identify different hand planes to know what I have and if they have any special uses. Much like grfrazee discusses in his answer I'm afraid there isn't a good comprehensive site for all of these, so you'll have to do some research on your own for some of the lesser-known makers. Common/Uncommon Type Breakdown There could ...


7

What I want to know is how to identify different hand planes to know what I have and if they have any special uses. My go-to source for Stanley hand plane information is Patrick Leach's Blood & Gore webpage. Don't let the name put you off - he has a plethora of information about all types of Stanley-made tools. The planes were made during different ...


7

They're all called "belt sanders", but typically have some descriptive adjectives in front of them. "Hand Held" and "Stationary" are generally used to distinguish portable hand-held tools with tools that stay in one place on a workbench: Hand Held Belt Sanders - These are belt sanders you can hold in your hand: (source) Stationary Belt Sanders - These are ...


7

It appears his right hand is holding something like a bow which I will assume is what is literally turning the wood. Yes, he's using a bow lathe, a turning method that goes back at least as far as ancient Egypt and still in wide use by craftsmen in the Middle East, as well as in Africa and across Asia. The photo in the Question is a bit murky, easier to ...


6

Use a chainsaw or horizontal bandsaw to remove a 2"x8"x10' slice, then cut the ends off that slice, trim to the desired angle, and glue the ends back on. Or go Roy Underhill on that railroad tie and use an axe to rough out the seat and a broad axe to clean it up. Protect yourself from the creosote while working by wearing pants, a long-sleeved shirt, and a ...


6

One supposed advantage of a grooved, or corrugated, sole on a plane is to prevent the plane from "sticking" to the surface of the wood, similar to the way two panes of glass (or any two smooth surfaces) will stick together if there's no air between them. It was originally intended to reduce friction by reducing the contact surface without compromising the ...


6

With the others I recommend to take care if your railroad tie is an actual tie that was treated and not just one cut to size. Now I'm going to recommend the adz, it's an ax like tool that has been used to shape logs for ages. This would allow you to do most of the rough shaping relatively quickly, it will work well with the tie laying on the ground as well....


6

This is a push drill as @keshlam said. They're particularly useful for drilling small diameter holes quickly, easily and accurately. It can be a bit tricky to drill a small hole steadily while you're holding a big heavy electric drill, or wobbling around with an "egg beater" style hand drill, which is where push drills come in. You can also use them one-...


6

Questions like this will lead to contradictory answers. There are some main points I would like to make to aid in everyone's answers. Experience Experience plays this role very well. As you are introduced to tools you will typically accept what you are being taught. If my dad handed me a jigsaw and called it a Lemon Mutilator that is what I would have ...


6

I do not know the specific make of that guide but it is known as a hand mitre saw. For example, from here: (The one in that image appears to resemble a vintage Stanley mitre box, maybe a Stanley 358.) There are other styles of mitre guides and boxes, too, the most familiar probably being the little plastic box with angled slots in the sides.


6

Self-tightening keyless chuck have similar clamping capabilities as keyed chucks, but the price premium on those types of chucks are significant. For example from the Jacobs site linked, the cheapest 1/2inch self-tightening keyless chucks are $185. Other than cost, one disadvantage of the keyless self-tightening chucks is that after some extreme high ...


6

This is a valve stem face cutter. It is essentially the old time equivalent of a bench mounted valve grinder; used for the repair of valve faces of internal combustion engines. You can see in the photo how the mechanism is set up. The valve stem is clamped firmly but free to turn with the blade and stop adjusted to the desired depth and angle of cut. The ...


5

The body of a typical hand plane is a single metal casting. An infill plane, by contrast, is formed from metal plates (sole and sides) joined along the edges, or sometimes by a single piece of metal U-channel. Dense wood is used to fill the space between the plates to support the sides, establish a bed for the iron, and to make holding the plane possible. ...


5

It's another one of those dastardly terminology issues - I think woodworkers are particularly prone to calling different things the same thing, and the same thing different things depending on who you ask! I would disagree with CharlieHorse's answer and call the top pictured saw a handheld jigsaw, and the bottom pictured saw a sabre saw or reciprocating saw....


5

A lot of great info already. A couple of pictures to spice it up. In my experience the most common flea market, yard sale, antique store, etc. planes and what I happen to have are: block plane You see these guys everywhere. This is a Stanley No. 110 smoothing plane This is a Stanley No. 4 jack plane This is a Stanley No. 5 (the tote is a little ...


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