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This is a very good topic to have here since there is active debate going on in woodworking circles about the overuse of sanding to smooth wood in the modern era. How do both techniques compare? In terms of result, cost, applicability to different kinds of wood, different shapes of work pieces and cleanliness of process. Where possible scraping is always ...


10

Despite the difficulties of the link, I think it is referring to the Rockwell hardness scale. The Rockwell scale is a hardness scale based on indentation hardness of a material. The Rockwell test determines the hardness by measuring the depth of penetration of an indenter under a large load compared to the penetration made by a preload.1 There are ...


9

How do both techniques compare? In terms of result, cost, applicability to different kinds of wood, different shapes of work pieces and cleanliness of process. Good question. As a preamble to an in-depth comparison between scraping and sanding let me frame my answer in terms of 'surface preparation' which is what you are doing when you are either ...


7

This will deal with sharpening a flat scraper. Curved scrapers follow the same principle, but I don't personally have any experience with them. First, you need to flatten the edge. I sandwich the scraper between two pieces of wood in my vise with perhaps 1/2" of the edge standing proud. Use a mill bastard file that is 2-3" longer than your scraper, and ...


6

Scraping is what they did before there was sandpaper. Scraping yields a different texture surface that feels more like wood, due to the fact that it is shearing the wood fibers rather than grinding them away. Sand paper is very popular because most people (myself included) haven't bothered to learn how to use card and cabinet scrapers to their fullest. ...


4

Some sort of planer or scraper is probably what you want. Sanding can take edges off bumps, but isn't actually that great for getting things flat. (Well, not unless you put sandpaper on something very hard and flat. e.g., when truing up metal surfaces by lapping them on fine grit paper attached to a nice flat surface.) Since you are going to the effort of ...


3

Sanding abrades the surface, leaving scratches everywhere. Scraping actually cuts the wood fibers, leaving a sharper contrast of the grain in porous woods like oak and walnut. On more even grained wood like maple the difference is a lot less noticeable, provided the sanding was accomplished correctly. As for results, it depends on the final finish. For a ...


2

I think this is one of those things you should do some comparative tests with, see the differences with your own eyes on your wood, prepped as you've done it. Without using dyes or other colourants to selectively enhance parts of the figure the general idea is to use a clear finish and generally one with some sort of yellow or amber colouration. Just as ...


2

Without seeing or handling a scraper that has gone through a sharpening process and isn't working it is hard to diagnose what's gone wrong, but there are some common problems that you might be experiencing. If the user is unable to create any burr at all1 I believe the most common issue (and the one I think most likely to be the cause here) is the prior ...


1

Well, I've done this a few times when moving into cheap apartments back when folks smoked in their homes and exhaust fans were the work of the devil. The pithy answer: mild degreaser, plastic scraper, lots and lots of elbow grease. The idea is you want the gunk to soften up and then help it peel off. Then deal with the stubborn parts that will just take ...


1

my scraping makes the glassy surface I had from just planing look more dull -- i am losing some sheen. No need to worry about that overly, one of the roles of finish is to add sheen and, depending somewhat on the finish chosen, it can equalise the appearance of different areas. Although it is considered best if the wood has a uniform surface and ...


1

Many videos exist on YouTube that provide tutorials; my favorite is one done by William Ng [via The Wood Whisperer]. They all have the same steps: file the edge, perhaps hone the edge with a stone, and turn the burr over with a burnisher. The problem is: after having watched them all, I still cannot do it well at all. I have never really been able to ...


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