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20

Obviously both of those cases are quite severe examples of edge damage, but even for single chips smaller than this re-grinding the bevel manually can be challenging. This level of edge repair is generally considered a job for power grinding. It is possible manually, I've done it entirely by hand on 'rescue chisels' using a combination of diamond plates ...


20

TL;DR warning. Sharpening is a deep and broad subject, with a lot of opinion and personal preference interspersed with the facts and science so be prepared to have to make your own mind up, i.e. choose your reality and stick with it! I don't think I missed an explanation as to why he chose to put that bevel beyond personal preference. Paul Sellers does ...


12

Sharpening is a lot trickier than one would expect. In order to have a sharp blade you need to have two polished sides meeting one another: the back of the plane iron (or chisel) and the bevel. A couple of tips really helped me as I was sharpening. Sharpen up to 8000 grit. I used to have harbor freight stones and they only went up to 1000 grit--not nearly ...


10

You never would normally chisel something like that. It would be cut using a mortising saw. If you did need to chisel it, like you were doing a Joseph the Carpenter, father of Jesus, re-enactment or something, you would use a soft-wood paring chisel and first make a vertical cut straight down across the grain, then you would set your chisel in that nick and ...


8

bench grinder is what I thought was the standard sharpening tool. A bench grinder is considered a coarse tool when it comes to sharpening fine woodworking implements. The only time you should need to use a bench grinder on a chisel is to re-establish a chisel edge that has been badly mangled or chipped from misuse. A factory-ground chisel should not need ...


8

Many videos and tutorials from the much respected internet woodworkers show them always going from a coarse medium through to a fine. I think there are three key things here. With respect to a few of them, the category "Internet woodworker" does not in general mean you're getting info from the best and most experienced craftsmen. Always worth bearing that ...


7

You mention that you have a sharpening stone. One improvement might also be to make an angled guard that you run atop the stone that helps to impart the proper chisel angle. Something like the below might help to ensure you get a razor-sharp edge at the proper angle.


7

Despite my comment above, I feel this is a very valuable question: Is there any objective evidence that it matters what kind of mallet you use? I think you could find it, if you would accept anecdotal evidence, but I'm certain it would be contradictory. From everything I've read, going back to historical books and right up to modern Internet sources, and ...


7

Almost universally people seem to suggest/imply that "better" tools are important and worth the price difference. That certainly used to be a worthwhile general shopping guide, one that is repeated in many early woodworking books that I've read (the same principle is repeated outside of woodworking circles too of course). But to be honest I'm not sure it ...


7

The simplest solution of all is seems to be to just to buy plastic end caps/edge protectors, which are available from some online tool vendors: But these have a few problems. The available sizes won't fit all chisel widths you might eventually collect (both Imperial and metric), and while you can always go up a size in theory as vintage chisels are often ...


7

It looks pretty good to me. It's hard to tell exactly from the pictures, but this is pretty close to what my chisels look like after sharpening. Get some honing compound and either some leather or some MDF scrap, pronto. It will take your chisels from "pretty good" to "holy wow that's amazing" in about 20 or so strokes along the strop. From where they are ...


6

Adding to Graphus's excellent and comprehensive answer. I have both the cheap PSI tools you linked to and the Crown Pro-PM Powdered Metallurgy. (as well as other misc pieces). I like both of them. Part of what makes a difference is what you are turning. Because the Pro-PM tools only need to be sharpened 1/3-1/4 as often as the PSI tools. Small ...


6

How do I sharpen curved tools like gouges? Very carefully. In addition to the obvious things of striving to maintain the bevel angle(s) and the shape of the cutting edge (many have a curved profile) the conventional advice is to be extremely careful not to put a tiny bevel on the opposite side to the main bevel, the reason given that it can hamper getting ...


6

It all depends. I use my bench grinder to sharpen some of my wood-turning chisels and I use a stone for others. One thing to be aware of with a bench grinder is for flat chisels it will leave a concave 'hole' in the face, since you are using a round object, the bigger the wheel the smaller the concavity. Large sharpening stones on farms were big enough ...


6

The sharper the angle, the sharper the chisel and the better it will slice through the wood fibers. However, this comes at the cost of durability. The shallower the angle, the more durable is the edge (since you have more metal behind the edge). As you can imagine, the angle is a matter of compromise - sharper or more durable. 25 degrees is a good middle ...


6

A quick search for lathe turning tool handles presents a number of links but no real results for templates. Making a template is rather straightforward. Create a profile of the handle shape you wish. You can view others' work to determine what looks pleasant and functional and use that as a starting point. Create a pencil sketch on paper to represent the ...


5

If it's that damaged, you're looking at removing a lot more metal than normal, creating an entirely new edge. Typically, that means careful work with a grinder (being careful not to overheat the metal), a metal-cutting file, or something similar. Once the tool is returned to the correct shape, you can sharpen it fairly normally -- flatten the back, establish ...


5

I've actually read Paul Seller's blog posts about sharpening a little while ago, and tried out his method on my chisels. Until now I used a sharpening jig to keep the straight factory bevel, and got the chisels pretty sharp. With Paul Seller's method of creating a convex bevel it's much easier to sharpen by hand (i.e. without the jig), and the process of ...


5

First, as Aloysius says above, you should stay away from the ends of the mortise during bulk removal. 1/16 of an inch or 1-2mm should be sufficient. Now, when you have done a bunch of chopping, and you have chips clogging the mortise, you need to clear them out, as you said. Use a bench chisel that is one "size" below your mortising chisel. For example, ...


5

While for a some turning work you probably could get away using some chisels as I have seen it done but I highly recommend you invest in a semi-decent set of tools just to get yourself started out (pre-assembled set or your own custom set if you buy the tools individually). The main difference in the types of tools are the bevels and grinds on the tool as ...


5

The one part in the sharpening process that I'm struggling with is removing the burr. Most people do when starting out so don't worry you're not alone. Also even experienced sharpeners will experience some difficulty every now and then because this is not only an issue of technique, sometimes the steel itself can be uncooperative. I'm a fairly harsh ...


4

I use a product called Dipseal for stuff like that. If you have ever had a saw blade sharpened, this is the stuff that the edges are covered in when you get it back. It can be melted and reused. I bought a 5 pound container of it years ago, and use it to coat forstner bits, chisels, and really anything with an edge that I want to protect. You can ...


4

The following may read like I am trying to talk you out of the idea but I'm not, just hoping to help you go into it with realistic expectations. Can I use sculptor chisels with a lathe? Yes, although I think you'd very quickly want to use some purpose-made turning tools if you start to do much turning, you can definitely use tools not designed for ...


4

TL;DR warning. Bench grinder, tool sharpener or sharpening stone? Yes :-) All of those are suitable tools for sharpening woodworking equipment, from chisels to plane irons to drill bits (certain types). Note on sharpening bits: most woodworkers don't sharpen their drill bits these days. Partly this is because many won't dull their bits noticeably in ...


4

Don't lever. Pare straight downward into the opening, taking it in multiple passes if necessary, and letting the chisel act as a wedge to do the work.


4

In my opinion, the biggest factor is fragility of the edge. A sharper angle will dull faster and is more likely to chip. So, it really depends on what your use is. For heavy gouges I use with a mallet, I may use angles over 30°. Chisels for mortising hinges on a door, mid 20s. For hand-held chasing of purfling ledges on a guitar build, the angle may be ...


4

With handtools you typically want to follow a "coarse, medium, fine" workflow. The coarse step will get generally close to the line, medium will refine that to hit the line, and fine will fine-tune and surface your piece. It sounds like you're trying to skip the coarse step and go straight to medium. Your coarse work should be done by either a saw or ...


4

there is none. eventually you will wear the blade down enough at 3000 grit to the point where it will take too long to sharpen while maintaining the same bevel angle. At that point a return to coarser grit will be necessary. Otherwise, your approach is the most efficient.


3

A fabric or leather tool roll is another classic solution, if you're willing to protect the set rather than individual chisels.


3

If you are sharpening on a grinder -- including slow and wet-wheel grinders -- the face will tend to follow the curve of the convex wheel and become concave. A larger wheel, such as the full-sized Tormek machines and their equivalents, would produce a larger radius and thus a less-concave surface. I can't imagine creating that shape any other way... and I'm ...


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