14

Under what condition, if any, can I reuse the rags? I just throw my finishing rags away after using them; I can't think of any case in which you'd want to reuse them. It would probably cost more to try to clean them than it would to get a new rag. What is the process for prepping these rags for safe disposal? Spread each one out flat to dry on the ...


8

I use a solvent called Brush Cleaner. It works well on both oil and acrylic based paints. It is stout stuff so wear gloves and use it in an open area. You will have to soak it for 24 hours or so but that does the trick for me. Be careful to keep the bristles straight as they soak as they will tend to assume the shape they have been held at. If your brush ...


8

Did I doom my paint brush to the garbage or is there something I can still do to save it? Salvaging a brush with hardened varnish (or paint) in it is actually quite doable. It will require a long soak in strong solvent or a solvent mixture, as in many commercial brush restorers/cleaners and paint strippers. I don't think it matters that much which you use ...


7

there appears to have been some sort of reaction with glue squeeze-out that has caused a sort of 'ebonzing' stain from the face of the clamp, through the glue puddle and into the wood. I hang my head in shame - I should have packed top and bottom and I promise I will NEVER take that short-cut again. This is a common reaction between steel and PVA glues, ...


7

Under what condition, if any, can I reuse the rags? Few people bother but you can wash them, just as with any oily cloth. It's probably best collected enough to make it worth doing a wash so store them wet (see next point). If you add some washing soda to the water you store the rags in it'll act as a pre-soak. Then either handwash or put into the washing ...


6

You could try using a chemical stripper to dissolve the varnish, as you would when removing this varnish from a table for refinishing. Be careful; many (but not all) of these formulations are quite toxic. However,it may be less expensive to replace the brush, especially when the value of your time is considered. Unless the brush is something of a family ...


6

The key search term for this residue is "pitch", like "removing pitch from blade". A variety of products for cleaning pitch off of cutting tools are sold, many of which use a caustic chemical like that found in spray-on oven cleaner. You may have luck with oven cleaner itself, although those chemicals can remove other things in addition to pitch, like paint ...


5

There are special products out there called sanding belt cleaners (one such is harbor freight sku 30766), they're essentially large gum eraser sticks that grab particles out of the sanding belt. Another avenue to look at is consider why the belt is loading up. Try applying less pressure while sanding, or run a shop vac in one hand and the sander in the ...


5

WD-40 is not equivalent to mineral spirits at all. Mineral spirits should normally be just naptha, where WD-40 has multiple different petroleum base oils, as well as a few other ingredients. Their compositions can be seen in the material safety data sheets: WD-40 MSDS Mineral Spirits MSDS Edit: As Allman and Keshlam say, the short answer is it will leave ...


4

You can reuse solvents a few times. However, at some point the solvent will be contaminated by too much of the thing you're cleaning. At this point, your solvent is no good. I can't really give you any pointers as to when this is, but you'll probably notice when the solvent doesn't work as well. See this related Question.


4

Concoction was left in the pail for about 3 weeks. Life got in the way. Most the tutorials about this sort of thing suggest a week at most. Not a problem. The goal is ideally to convert all of the acetic acid to iron acetate, so giving it longer is advisable, not a bad thing in any way. As I've alluded to previously, most guides to this sort of thing are ...


3

In addition to cleaning your belt with a cleaning stick as rockerpult suggested, you should also take a look at the material you're sanding and the belt you're sanding with. Finishes that form a film on top of the wood (paint, shellac, polyurethane, etc.) often clog sandpaper, so if you're using the sander on a large finished surface, you might want to ...


3

To what extent, if any, can I reuse mineral spirits? As I touch on in a previous Answer, you can re-use rinsing solvents a few times. The larger the volume you work with the more you can re-use it. And it is well worth rinsing in a much larger jar than you would perhaps naturally go with; small jars should definitely be avoided even if you plan to wash ...


2

Is it OK to use WD-40 to clean wood? I think this is an it depends more than a clear no. I wouldn't ever use it on bare wood, but then I don't think people should use mineral oil on wooden products and that is widely done these days. I have actually read of WD-40 being used as a finish of sorts for bare wood fairly recently on a blog somewhere, either for ...


2

Along with the other recommended chemicals I use a wire brush. Once you have soaked it and it is somewhat supple use the wire brush to clean it. Start at the handle and stroke down with the bristles. This works sometimes.


2

It's worth knowing what the stone is made of, because you can expect different performance from different types, and the use may be different, in particular the appropriate cutting lubricant. I'm not sure I would use any stone dry, although diamond plates (not stones technically) might be best used dry for some applications. An old whetstone is probably ...


2

I've been using an old sneaker because I saw it recommended repeatedly. Seems to work fine, and doesn't effect the remaining grit so far as I can tell. https://www.familyhandyman.com/tools/use-a-sneaker-to-clean-sandpaper/


1

This sounds like adhesive residue, and if so, it will be removable with the right solvent. There is no way to tell by looking at it which one, although common solvents are aliphatic hydrocarbons (heptane, naphtha, mineral spirits), ethyl acetate, MEK, and acetone.


1

Well, I've done this a few times when moving into cheap apartments back when folks smoked in their homes and exhaust fans were the work of the devil. The pithy answer: mild degreaser, plastic scraper, lots and lots of elbow grease. The idea is you want the gunk to soften up and then help it peel off. Then deal with the stubborn parts that will just take ...


1

I have one of the rubber sanding belt cleaners, but I've found compressed air to be just as effective, and most people would have at least a small air compressor in their shop.


1

In our industrial timber workshop we use an industrial degreaser to clean the tools. We just let the tools soak in it overnight. It works very well but it's pretty dangerous stuff so care has to be taken when handling it.


1

How far to take a cleaning is always up to the individual. As with old tools you can basically clean something up a little bit all the way to a full restoration and it's completely up to you how far you take it. The minimalist approach often seeks to "preserve patina" – note that the majority of patina is actually built-up dirt and rust on old things! (not ...


1

I have had good luck suspending brushes in solvent as well. I typically hang them from a nail so the bristles will not get deformed and lower the brush 3/4 of the way into the solvent to prevent mucking up the roots of the bristles.


1

I put used paint thinner back in an old container and let the junk settle out. The top pours clear, and seems to still work.


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