Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
15

Standard means that the blade will pivot around the horizontal axis, but remains 90° to the bed of the saw. This is the most basic variation, and is simply a powered version of grandpa's old miter box. Compound means that the blade tilts on the vertical axis as well as pivoting around the horizontal. Other than a few specialized models (mostly for cutting ...


14

A 12" miter saw blade of the ilk normally found on a miter saw or cut-off saw looks like this: The teeth on the saw blade are carbide material that is very hard. You will not want to take a file to those teeth as they will very quickly kill your file. This type of saw blade has gained huge popularity in recent years because the hardness of the carbide ...


13

Typically if you need two or more equal-length parts from a single board, you'll select a board longer than what you need to cut all the parts, cut the board as close to "in half" as you care to, then gang all the pieces together or set up a stop block to cut them to the final equal length. Sometimes you may not cut to final length until after you've ...


12

I think this falls under the "it's true, but doesn't matter" category. Motors will operate at their peak efficiency when clean, but it takes a lot of dust build up before the performance or longevity would be impacted. Personally, I clean off my tools prior to storing them, just because I like to keep things neat. My Dad used the same miter saw on ...


12

You are, indeed, using your radial arm saw correctly, but it's important to note the critical differences between the two tools. In both cases, you would be making a climb cut when pulling the blade toward you. A climb cut is generally less safe because the blade literally tries to "climb" over the wood as it pulls itself into and over the wood. If you ...


10

According to the owner's manual from DeWalt's website, the crosscut capacity at 0º Miter / 0º Bevel is 9-9/16" (243 mm) wide and up to 4-1/2" (114 mm) thick. However, there is also a special procedure described in the "special cuts" section of the owner's manual whereby you can remove the top part of each side of the fence and build a platform to increase ...


9

Rather than a higher quality miter saw I purchased a low end sliding miter saw years ago and have not regretted the choice. I did try out several sliding miter saws before making my choice, however, as I found that very low end saws were extraordinarily imprecise. The import shop, for instance, had something that cost half as much, but when manipulating it ...


8

I've done this successfully with my hand mitre saw, though the cut may not be as much cleaner (than with the blade you have) as you expect. I often use metal-cutting blades for wood on my jigsaw. On melamine-coated chipboard you get a much nicer cut than with the finest wood blades I can easily buy (which aren't very fine). Blades for metal also seem to ...


7

You mention thickness but you don't mention length or where the cut was on your wood in respect to that length. Use your fence effectively From the sounds of it you are cutting near the end of what sounds like short wood. Many mitre saws (single/dual compound) don't have a full fence (so that the blade has room to rotate) and they taper down near the ...


7

Here is another method from the always-interesting Mathias Wandel. Mathias's jig


7

You've hit on both options. You measure the board to it's exact dimensions, (I have yet to see them exactly 8') then you mark the center. At this point you can either attempt to cut the board centering the line with the miter or you measure the kerf, (usually 1/8") split that in half (1/16") make your line there and follow the new line for the miter. My ...


7

I tend to agree that compound miters have horrible dust collection design. Mostly I've given up, even though I have hose connected to my dust collector. My dust collector doesn't have enough static pressure and the little port tends to get clogged. I'm sure that this is one tool the Shop-Vac actually works much better on. However, I do have one ...


7

Most miter saws don't have very good dust collection. You can buy or build a hood to catch the dust. (Source) (Source) Some hoods can be connected to your dust collector, while others funnel the dust down into a bucket.


7

What LeeG's answer covers is pretty spot on when it comes to build up of dust on the motor and the hidden areas. There is really no inherent harm in trying to clean the tools after every use (sort of somehow pushing dust into a crevice I suppose) except for maybe being an exercise in futility. Not to condone it but my 12 inch mitre saw has hardened sawdust ...


7

There are a couple main (safety) concerns with this: the pieces moving while cutting and the offcuts getting caught in the blade. Pieces moving while cutting This is not so much an issue with safety as it is with accuracy. If one (or all) of the pieces move, you'll need to redo the cut on at least one of the boards, potentially negating any time savings ...


7

Why do people position the saw in the middle why not at one end with a small overlap on the short side? Part of the reason people put the saw in the middle is so that they can cut miters from both sides of the blade. If you have a piece of molding, it's very hard and inaccurate to cut both miters from the same side, since that requires flipping the piece ...


6

I do not know the specific make of that guide but it is known as a hand mitre saw. For example, from here: (The one in that image appears to resemble a vintage Stanley mitre box, maybe a Stanley 358.) There are other styles of mitre guides and boxes, too, the most familiar probably being the little plastic box with angled slots in the sides.


6

For the Miter saw: Ditto on LeeG and Matt's answers. On the Tablesaw, I clean the table top off every time to avoid anything that might rust the cast iron top, then I give a quick wipe down with a lubricant (very quick spray and wipe, nothing detailed). On the inside, my DC keeps the cabinet reasonably dust free, but at least once a year, I vacuum that out ...


6

I couldn't figure anything out from inspecting the saw on the outside, so I opened up the saw. It turns out that the saw did not go all the way down because there was a lot of saw dust on the inside:


6

Putting the saw in the middle maximizes the size of the pieces you can create from your offcut. Say you put the saw 1m from the end of your shop. Now you've got a 4m board and you need to create 2m work pieces. With your setup you are unable to fit the offcut between the blade and the wall. You would have to cut a scrap 1m piece, then another scrap 1m ...


5

Depth of cut is usually the primary factor associated with choosing a saw diameter, but certain types of saws are affected in other ways. Besides depth of cut, one factor that impacts all types of saws is that larger blades require more materials in general to manufacture, but they also require more teeth for the same type or quality of cut. As a result, ...


5

I agree with Doresoom, attacking it with a chisel** will only ruin both tools. You could probably hand sharpen the blade with a collection of sharpening stones. However, if you're not proficient at sharpening something simple like a knife or chisel, I'd say your best bet* would be to check the modern local yellow pages for a knife/saw sharpener in your area ...


5

I will try the method from John Heisz with diamond file when my saw blade will be used. Video link here


5

You could use the old geometry trick of bisecting a line: http://www.mathopenref.com/constbisectline.html It would require more space of course and something you could use as a larger compass, which could be nothing more than two 2x4's fitted perpendicularly with a pencil taped to the end of one of them and a nail sticking out of the other for a "compass" ...


5

I don't want to be left out of this party, so here's my take. No matter how carefully you measure you're always going to have one half slightly larger than the other after the first cut. So you need to cut one slightly short and trim the other to match. I think the biggest thing other answers are missing is the use of a stop block to guarantee a repeatable ...


5

I'm in a similar situation with a 14' (4,25m) wall. I don't recommend setting up your miter saw in the middle. I believe it depends on your usual stock length. For me, it's 8' (2,5m), so I have it that one side is 8' (2,5m) and the other is the left over. This way, I can just cut a few inches from my 8' (2,5m) stock. Which I do frequently to start with ...


4

First, you should have the piece of wood you are cutting (work piece) pressed firmly against the fence. The rotation of the blade will pull the work piece toward the fence. If you are using a sliding miter saw, the proper technique is to pull the blade forward, then down, then push it back into the piece. If you are trying to use it like a radial arm saw (...


4

Leaving sawdust in contact with metal will promote rust. The reason for this is that the sawdust can absorb moisture, essentially wetting the metal. Also, many woods have acidic pH, so you are essentially exposing your tools to acid by leaving sawdust on them, which will promote rust.


4

The quickest way to measure is not to measure at all. The board is a rectangle, therefore opposing sides of it are parallel to each other. Now say you lay your measuring tape across the board like so wherever the middle of the tape is, it will also be the middle of the board (or half of the board width) You can place the tape however you want. You are ...


4

I bought a 12" Dewalt compound miter years ago. The slider was too much more at the time. I love my saw but I am always regretting not having a slider. It is amazing how often I have boards that are 1/2" -2" too wide. A 12" miter does not cut a 12" board, like you probably noticed the 10" doesn't come close to a 10" board either. My recommendation, is ...


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