33

You want to raise the grain before using water-based finishes, as those will also raise the grain, but you won't be able to adequately scrape/sand off the raised fibers. I'd recommend using distilled water, as it doesn't have any minerals that can discolor some kinds of wood. Don't flood the surface, but wipe it on with a clean cloth and allow it to dry ...


13

Water swells the wood fibers and they will plastically (permanently) deform. This leaves a rougher surface than what was prepared by sanding or scraping. Sanding after staining typically causes the color to be more uneven, and needing another coat of stain to even out more. Pre raising the grain with plain water and lightly sanding with ~320 grit to remove ...


13

This should be ok if you gave the stain 3-4 days to properly dry out. You'll want the oil-based drying agent to completely vaporize from the stain before applying the water-based finish. Please see this forum thread. To quote from a Minwax representative: SUBJECT: Minwax Water Based Polyurethane Over Minwax Wood Finish Stains You may apply the ...


12

The problem appears to be that glue has sealed the pores of the wood, preventing stain from penetrating. In order to fix the stain, you'll first need to get to wood that's not sealed. I can think of two options: Remove the glue from the wood. You might be able to use a solvent appropriate to the kind of glue you used to loosen and weaken the glue, and then ...


12

Raising the grain not only helps to bring out fibers that might swell when applying the actual finish, but saturating the grain beforehand with a wood conditioner will help to make the grain "pop out" (be more visually appealing) which when you're trying for a beautiful finish, is something that you'd normally want.


11

There are grain fillers which are often used on open grained wood like red oak to make it take a stain more evenly, using this on the end grain of a board should do the same thing. What you are needing is a way to make the end grain absorb about the same amount (which is much less) as the face. Using finer sandpaper on the ends will help a small bit, but ...


11

Can I apply water-based polyurethane over an oil based stain? Short answer: yes. Longer answer: if you wait for the oil-based stain to properly 'dry' (cure) it's no longer oily. This is because the curing process for oil is polymerisation, and polymerised oil is akin to resin. So far so good, but am I likely to have problems with poly adhesion in the ...


10

Good answers, but nobody seems to have mentioned yet that some timber types are very prone to grain raising, and some really are not. I have never "raised the grain" by dampening as a separate process, but I have seen the effects of this raising after applying a water-based base coat. From my (admittedly limited) experience, denser hardwoods seem to be less ...


10

Stain the pieces separately before they're glued up, hoping that I don't have to sand through the whole stain to get the joints flush. Even the deepest penetrating commercial stains, applied in the normal way, don't allow much sanding so it's best to aim to do almost none after staining if possible. When it comes to flushing joints, even if you only have a ...


9

I'm with Sashco, the company who posted that picture. Yes, the prepped sections were taped off in order to clearly mark where the different prep methods were done. After all prep was done, a very narrow groove was cut into the wood before the new stain section to help delineate it a bit more. All of the logs start on the far left with sun-damaged wood with ...


8

First of all, can it be done? Broadly speaking yes, any darker wood can be matched by any lighter wood (in terms of colour, grain pattern is another story). how does one mix and match stains to achieve the right color? This is the hard part. Without specific products lined up and samples of the same woods you're using it's essentially impossible for ...


8

As far as I can tell this is standard pine/softwood V-groove, tongue-and-groove flooring. This or something quite similar should be widely available where flooring material is sold. exactly as the blog author stated she did it Once you find your suitable equivalent product I would suggest a few minor deviations from the process described. The first is ...


8

You can get this flatter certainly, but you may not be able to get them totally flat or to get them to stay that way permanently — wood that has bowed can show a tendency to want to return to that shape. One method is to wet the cupped side and put the wood out in the sun to dry. A variation of this is to wet both side but have the wet side sit on grass ...


8

It looks to me as though whomever did this just stuck the end of the piece into a can of finish, one end at a time. If you were to dunk the end into the finish, allow it to sit for a short period of time, then pull it out, it would provide the nice even line you see. Allow the excess to drain off, then do the next piece. There wouldn't be too much of a ...


8

Their website says: Different Wood Prep Methods Not only does the type of wood affect how the stain will appear, different preparation and application methods will affect the final result. Power washed logs, hand-sanded logs, and media blasted logs will all soak up the stain differently. The image below illustrates how wood prep affects the ...


8

Almost every glue commonly in use won't take stain, and one or two that are said to stain don't stain as well as you'd like (similar story with 'stainable filler' incidentally) so it's good practice generally when glueing to take steps to prevent squeeze-out being left on the surface of the wood. The main ways people do this include wiping up the glue ...


7

I've heard (but haven't verified) that if you sand the end grain with a higher grit it will match the stain of the face grain (can't confirm). So, if you sand to 220 on the face grain, sand to 320 on the end grain.


7

The water stain on the desk looks like it could be blush in the lacquer itself rather than damage to the wood. Blushing is caused by moisture trapped in the finish. There are a number of ways to address it, but the goal is always to allow the moisture to escape. Some ideas I've read about in the past: mild abrasive: Rubbing the affected area with toothpaste ...


7

The process is known as wood pickling. The vinegar (acetic acid) combines with the steel wool to create iron acetate which reacts with the various tannins in the wood to darken it from grey to black. Some woods don't have many tannins, so you can apply the black tea to add some. You can dilute the mixture if it darkens your wood too much. The effect ...


7

The only entirely foolproof way I know to remove deep, long-set water marks is to sand to bare wood, restain (if your piece was stained) and refinish. However, fresh, less deep stains may be more easily remedied, as I've found with some quick internet research. Doing a quick google search has found the following home remedies. I have not tested any of ...


7

Apparently there is at least one method of doing this, by chemically breaking down or replacing wood lignin with acrylic. However this method may only be practical in laboratory-type settings, or at least its not like there is an obvious readily-available product to do it. But it could be with some more digging that a practical process could be described. ...


6

should wood conditioner be applied between each coat or only before the first coat? Only before the first coat. Pre-stain wood conditioners are to help (note: not solve) with blotching, which is the irregular absorption of stain into the wood. Most woods have some variation in absorption from earlywood to latewood, but for blotch-prone woods the ...


6

Nit, the only downside to using such stains has to do with repeat-ability. If you come back the next day and mix up a new batch of stain, it may not match the batch from the day before. So while it's fine for single small objects, or areas that you can do with one batch, you may run into trouble if you've got multiple objects that you want to match, or a ...


6

It depends. On blotch prone woods such as pine, poplar, cherry, and maple, yes. On oak and walnut, it depends. A pre-stain conditioner can limit absorption and therefore the shade of the stain - it may not be as dark. Pre-stain conditioning will even out the color tone across the piece, and this may or may not be desirable, i.e. for a more rustic look don't ...


6

I did a similar look for a neighbor. Basically you apply a finish (or use reclaimed wood). After it dries, add another layer. Repeat until you have a few layers. Then sand it off. Sand deeper on some parts, lighter on others. If you want, apply a clear coat after you have achieved the look you want to protect it.


6

At this point, you have numerous options: Replace the mismatched parts with red oak. Experiment with dye and/or stain on several scrap pieces to try to get them to match the coloring of the red oak. This will be incredibly difficult, and even if you do succeed, they may age differently. Rather than trying to match the red oak, experiment with dye and/or ...


6

You're misunderstanding what a stain is. In the traditional sense of the word (slightly diluted by modern commercial usage) a stain's job is to colour wood, and that is its sole function. Protection is provided by something else, i.e. your final finish, be it shellac, varnish or lacquer.


6

The sanding between coats is entirely for the keeping a smooth finish. Any bubbles or raised grain are knocked back. When I sand, I rarely pass the sand paper more than a couple light passes. then check for visual and touch cues to see if anything more needs some extra sanding, say a drip that dried. If you are sanding away the stain you are sanding too ...


6

Something that nobody's mentioned so far is that if your stain isn't penetrating, you've got another problem. If there's a previous finish still on top of the wood, forming a seal, stain won't penetrate, and the least bit of sanding will remove it. 'Sticky stain' is a very common symptom for this. If that's the case, you might want to try to strip it ...


6

My question is: is there a way to properly apply tung oil to the stained wood without removing the stain during the sanding process? Yup: don't sand. Drying oils are not a surface coating, they're a penetrating finish, so basically there's nearly no difference between sanding oiled wood and directly sanding the surface of the stained wood, which many ...


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