10

What should I apply to seal the edges from leaking and seal the top from absorbing? Indoor use, subject to humidity. Technically you don't have to do anything to it, many people have MDF benchtops with no finish on them. The moisture in the air is basically a non-issue for MDF, it's only liquid water that you need to be concerned with. On a separate ...


9

There are lighter and darker oil-based polys (and other varnishes, not all oil-based varnishes contain polyurethane) but essentially all are various shades of yellow. This is inherent to the product because they're oil-based, that base oil is almost invariably slightly yellow. But also refer to the Note below. Broadly speaking the clear finishes — ...


9

My advice would be not to make glasses out of wood so I'll put that out there right at the start. The only sure-fire ways of waterproofing wood are to completely encase it in a film finish, or impregnate it with something waterproof. Both of these are possible at home, but you then have to worry about the food-safe aspect of whatever you're using. I don't ...


8

Unless you want to refinish the whole table, this is really just going to come down to trial and error. Find some scrap wood, head down to the store to find some similar looking stains / oils / etc., and keep trying on scrap until you find something. You're probably not going to get the finish exactly right. You might also want to take a look through these ...


6

Apply the varnish more thinly. Thinly is a pun here, as I mean thinned but this will directly result in a thinner coat being applied to the wood. A thin coating is automatically less subject to problems due to gravity, and at best there is zero risk of runs, drips or sags. A thin coating also dries more quickly — varnish drying time is directly linked to ...


6

Shellac doesn't do well with water, that's your starting point here. It's also relatively brittle and with the expected movement in the wood you're likely to see problems with cracking. Bonding to the paint shouldn't be an issue initially at least, the perceived wisdom is that "shellac sticks to everything and everything sticks to shellac" and while that's ...


6

Is this a common finish? No. Oil/wax blends are not common and I think for good reason. Looked at a certain way it's because it combines the worst of both materials, something I don't say lightly. Qualitatively what is the difference in a finish with using something like this (e.g. oil and a really small amount of wax) compared to paste wax? Excellent ...


6

Yes you absolutely want to treat the ends of fence boards, even if they don't face upwards but especially if they do. Typically you wouldn't use anything different on them, just coat with the same product you use to protect the faces of the boards. However, an additional coat (or two) is advisable since the end grain is very much more absorbent than the ...


6

I do not want to write a book on this. fully cured drying oil finishes, except ones with zinc (and other metallic) driers, are usually suitable to come into contact with food. The FDA regulates this in the US, these so-called food grade finishes are usually made from tung oil (china wood oil is another name). You will see FDA approved on the label of ...


6

I've worked with redwood in the past, and it seems like it would hold up well for the grips both from past experience and from some articles I've found. In woodworking circles you'll generally be told to rely on hardwoods or fruitwoods where you want a tough, resilient handle for something. Certain hardwoods and fruitwoods were the traditional picks for ...


6

Although there continues to be disagreement on this point online (which I expect won't ever stop) any common finish should actually be acceptable for this. The finish needs to be fully cured, see the previous Question What is the difference between "curing" and "drying"? for more on what that means. Notwithstanding the info below, if you ...


6

As always "what's the best xxxx" is not a good Question. In almost all cases there isn't a best but instead multiple good options to pick from, and that is very much the case here. I am concerned about protecting the wood in a humid/damp environment. You don't have to be. People worry about this sort of thing a lot these days (I did too early on) but ...


6

I'll preface my comments by saying that finish choice is a very personal thing, what one person is comfortable using and living with (in terms of upkeep and periodic maintenance) another would not. And equally the second person's preferred finish will often not suit the first person's. The surface of the table is roughly 8x4 feet, and I'm worried about ...


5

Short answer, there is no product you can apply that will preserve the color of cedar for the long term. There are some products you can apply to slow the aging process of the cedar or just cover it up, as I have found with some internet research. Cabot, along with other finish makers, make decking stains and finishes that will generally protect and ...


5

My question is, how should I expect a fairly thick shellac finish (over paint) to behave outdoors over time? It will be exposed to sunlight, a wide range of temperatures, and plenty of rain, snow, and ice. I'm going to reference this thread at This Old House for some of these answers. Should I expect flaking? Yep. Shellac will trap moisture under the ...


5

This is the type of thing that should be asked "what finish could I use...." rather than should. There are essentially no areas of finishing where there's a should use, almost every case comes down to what the builder chooses to use that fulfils the requirements as they see them. The same on-paper requirements are guaranteed to lead to different ...


5

Should be completely transparent All standard finishes are transparent, but some are not without a little colour, or "water white" as it's usually referred to. If you don't mind that it imparts a noticeable yellow/amber tone to the wood (which will increase slowly over time) then an oil-based polyurethane is a good choice here. This is the finish you can ...


5

There are various ways of introducing wax to wood, including dissolving the wax into the mineral oil (this makes what some call "board butter" or "spoon butter"), making up a conventional paste wax, or by applying it molten. The goal here is to get the wax to be absorbed by the wood as deeply as possible, not just to apply a coat of wax to the surface which ...


4

Stain is to colour wood, you only need to use that if you want to change the basic colour of the oak (make it darker, more brown, more reddish etc.) but you sound like you're happy enough with it as-is so you really only need to worry about the topcoat or final finish, the protective coating. Your easiest and best option here may be polyurethane varnish (...


4

My understanding is that baltic birch takes stains in a blotchy manor in general. Since it is not the only wood that does this, they have products for blotch control. One group is called pre-conditioners. They are applied to the wood before you stain and they even out the grains ability to absorb stain. This will even out the stains absorption and then ...


4

I lack the equipment and experience to do the finish with an airbrush and tinted lacquer, so I've set my sights on using water based wood dyes to rub on Let me stop you right there. Believe it or not you've actually set yourself a harder task, where it's more difficult to achieve the result you're aiming for. You'd want to do some pretty extensive testing ...


4

I was thinking of using outdoor paint, like for a house. Is latex based a good choice? Yes but you'd probably get better results from a dedicated indoor paint. While paint for outdoor applications seems like it would be toughest much of it is actually formulated to provide flexibility (to deal with the substrate expanding and contracting due to ...


4

If you are willing to spray a finish, I think the go to would be lacquer. This will provide a hard and durable finish that is frequently used on furniture, cabinets, etc. Paint is always an option though will probably not provide as durable of a finish as lacquer. As for latex or oil, it is really up to you based on what you're comfortable working with. ...


4

Lacquer can stick to epoxy. How secure the bond is depends on a few factors but if you provide a textured surface for a mechanical bond to form — as you do when you sand — that gives the best chance for a reliable result. I should caution that people have had very mixed results trying to repair/restore the surface of epoxy with varnish and lacquer. At ...


4

OK simple answer here, varnish. While waterbased varnishes have been tested and some shown to provide very good protection from liquids containing alcohol, including red wine, a simpler broad-strokes recommendation would be oil-based varnish. As a class this product, regardless of formulation, will be alcohol-proof once fully cured. Polyurethane is the ...


4

It really depends what type of finish you're looking for. The most common method I've seen is to paint the entire piece, let it dry, then sand through the new paint in a few places for a distressed appearance. You could also paint the whole piece, but wipe off the new paint in some places before it dries. Or, before painting, you could rub wax in a few ...


4

I don't know whether I want to stain the bed at all. I like the color of natural pine, and staining it would be additional work. I'd certainly be in favour of not staining myself. It's not only that it means the pine is used as pine (not trying to pretend it's something else) but it and other similar softwoods are notorious for staining badly, giving awful ...


4

This is a massive topic, and I'm personally not well equipped to completely answer it, just approaching the novice → intermediate transition myself (nor would I attempt to -- volumes of books by hundreds of authors have been written about this over hundreds of years), but maybe I can at least point you to a few resources on here that might help you with ...


4

Nearly any hardwood you desire should work since the exposure to heat and water is moderate. Go for what looks good to you. Although some woods are more porous than others, the applied finish will seal the surface and reduce the risk of penetrating water damage. One thing you should consider is that any veneer you apply will cause stress in the thin (9mm) ...


4

Both redwood and basswood are on the softer end of the Janka hardness scale, which measures the hardness of woods. But I am having a hard time imagining they'd fail to "hold up" to the kind of (ab)use a gaming controller would take. (Assuming you're not in the habit of slamming them down or throwing them across the room, that is. Which in any case is hard on ...


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