19

when I am levelling out wood with my plane, I get little pits (likely I suspect from the blade chipping against denser areas. This is called tearout, it is not caused by denser areas of the wood (in fact it can be common in softer sections of a piece of wood). It occurs when bundles of wood fibres literally tear free from the surface of the board instead ...


10

All you need to do to prepare wood for glueing is to 'clean' the surface. This can actually just be cleaning in the literal sense of the word since a wipe down with soapy water (followed by rinsing with clean water), or using one of a number of solvents, is sufficient in some instances. But generally it's better practice to expose new wood. For wood already ...


9

This is likely to be related to the direction of the grain: So you should pick the direction of planing depending on which way the grain slopes. Unfortunately however, some timbers (particularly some types of hardwood) have "interlocked" or "wavy" grain: The best thing I can suggest is that you get yourself a belt-sander as it's quite easy to remove these ...


9

I used a belt sander to remove most of the finish of some old tiger oak flooring before running it through the planer. 80 grit sand paper is cheaper than blades. But I did keep a set of old blades to use for the first pass on all of them. A metal detector is a great investment if you'll be doing a lot of reclaiming.


8

Is there a better/recommended way to do this? All the methods you list are recommended ways of removing dust from the workpiece. Brushing is actually a very good way to get dust off wood, and for many woodworkers it's the main method they rely on. It's just that you usually can't do it properly with only one brush. You can use a large soft hand brush to ...


8

How can I get these price tag stickers off in a way that the wood will okay to take stain in those places? Re. the highlighted portion, you shouldn't need to worry about that because the surface of the wood should be worked enough that this stops being a concern — it's good practice never to attempt to stain, or otherwise finish1, any wood bought pre-...


7

Your item #3 is called a tack cloth and is quite commonly used for removing dust, because, as you noted, it's quite effective, and it's a highly recommended solution. According to the linked Wikipedia article, there may be some VOC concerns, however, with increasing environmental regulations, those are either A) listed on the packaging, or B) being phased ...


7

When we stripped the paint in my house growing up we used a heat gun and paint scrapers. It was tedious but fairly effective.


6

Whether a peice of wood is worth it depends on how you are going to use it. If you want it for inlays then you don't need much viable wood. You just need enough to cut of the piece you want with a scroll- or band-saw. If you want to build a cabinet out of it then you will need a lot more. You can scrape of the finish with a chisel. Sharpen it and hold it ...


6

Instead of sucking it up you can blow it away using compressed air (or just your lungs). A moist (not wet) cloth will minimize the water you apply to the wood. A micro-fibre cloth is dry but will also have a very good dust grabbing properties.


6

I think your best bet would be to use dry ice blaster. It is sort of like sand blasting, but the way the dry ice works is it will destroy the paint and evaporate into CO2 before it will harm the sub-structure (meaning the wood). The information on the page says: Dry ice blasting: is a non-abrasive, nonflammable and nonconductive cleaning method ...


6

They have been painted though and I'm looking for a method to remove the paint, and let the natural wood stand out instead. I live in an apartment building that used to be a large furniture factory. The building is all exposed brick and heavy timber framing. If you look closely at the timbers, you can see evidence that they were painted at one point but ...


6

should wood conditioner be applied between each coat or only before the first coat? Only before the first coat. Pre-stain wood conditioners are to help (note: not solve) with blotching, which is the irregular absorption of stain into the wood. Most woods have some variation in absorption from earlywood to latewood, but for blotch-prone woods the ...


5

My question is, since the grain raises and I have to re-sand it anyway, do I really need to sand it before priming? Birch has a tendency to be a bit stringy even after sanding, so this could be what you're experiencing. If you're painting, you can probably get away with a less-smooth surface than if you were using a film finish like clear polyurethane. ...


5

The best glue joins, with wood, will have mated face grain surfaces i.e. no gaps between the wood where the glue is going. Generally smooth (sanded or scraped) wood surfaces are encouraged. Once the glue is place and covering both surfaces apply pressure, with clamps where possible. You should be able to put a fair amount so that you can see some glue seep ...


5

A cabinet scraper might be another solution, removing the wood the glue adhered to.


5

Odds are that your chainsaw cuts aren't going to be super smooth, so you'll end up sizing them with other tools. I cannot imagine that a bit of oil would cause any issue for a planer or jointer knife. On the face grain, the planing/jointing would likely remove any oily bits, and cutting the pieces to length (circular, miter, table or hand saw) would likely ...


4

Only before the first. Wood conditioner's job is to manage stain absorption in woods which would otherwise soak it up strangely. Once that partial pore-filling has been done, stain shouldn't disturb it.


4

Lacquer can stick to epoxy. How secure the bond is depends on a few factors but if you provide a textured surface for a mechanical bond to form — as you do when you sand — that gives the best chance for a reliable result. I should caution that people have had very mixed results trying to repair/restore the surface of epoxy with varnish and lacquer. At ...


4

Unfortunately there are no easy solutions to removing paint from rough wood in situ. Methylene-chloride paint remover: Dont know how difficult that would be to remove the pain on the rough surface inside a house Chemical strippers are in many ways the ideal way to strip paint (and varnish) from woodworker because, as odd as it might seem, they actually ...


4

I'd use mineral spirits or another solvent (lacquer thinner, denatured alcohol, etc.) to remove the residue. You should verify compatibility with your finishing product before use.


4

It sounds like you keep your wheelbarrow outside, as I do. I recently sanded my wheelbarrow handles and treated them with "spar urethane" to solve the same persistent splinter problem you've described, and I expect it will prevent further oxidation and degradation of the wood during continued outdoor storage. "Spar urethane" or "...


3

Recommend an intial pass with a shop vac, which will capture probably 95% of the dust. It is good to use a shop vac to clean the surface between sanding grits, removing the larger grit particles from the wood before sanding with the next higher grit. While blowing the dust off with compressed air removes the dust, it also mixes it into the air so some of it ...


3

To completely remove the paint (nooks and crannys included), the wood will eventually have to be planed down. The majority could be removed with a heat gun and scraper, then planed to get the last traces off. A hand scraper could get paint out of nooks and crannys. You might consider just covering the timbers (box them in) with new wood of the type you want ...


3

In this case the safest bet (you should still check with the artist about the kind of paint used) would be to utilize a waterborne sealer. The technology has come a long way and is as durable if not more so than old fashioned sealers (poly, lacquer etc). As additional bonuses, the smell is far less offensive, it dries more quickly, and is not prone to ...


3

do I really need to sand... before priming? Ideally yes. The role of sanding is not just about smoothing, it can also be about prepping a surface to properly accept a finish (or glue). Any older wood surface should be sanded lightly prior to applying glue to ensure a good bond and the same holds for when paint or varnish is applied. Just to be clear, you ...


3

Fixing the MDF: I'm planning on mixing a glue/sawdust/wood-filler/mdf/sawdust mixture up, clamping the board in place, applying the glue, letting the glue dry, removing the clamps and board, and then sanding it down. This will likely work fine as far as making a cohesive fill that's strong enough. I've repaired small defects in MDF and hardboard in much ...


3

No you don't have to bother waxing the bottoms. You can if you want to but it isn't needed, it won't help prevent expansion from humidity (a wax finish is much too thin to provide a seal against moisture) and won't help improve stability. Even if you were using a much better moisture-excluding finish like shellac or varnish finishing the underside of ...


3

As some people already pointed out, the carbide tool is not as sharp as a HSS bowl gouge can be. The scratches on the outside can only prevent by a shearing cut with a very sharp tool because the grain needs to be cut in almost 90 degrees. Sanding will not help much, depending how deep the chunking is... The scratches on the inner part look more like ...


3

I used cloth adhesive tape. It worked well and probably has a better grip and feel than duct tape. You could also get some sports tape, like that used on hockey stick handles or baseball bats.


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