8

Usually when varnish makes a surface rough, it's either that it's picked up dust during the drying process, or it was being brushed/wiped too long after application. Gently sanding between thicker coats is necessary to ensure the peaks and valleys of the finish don't interfere with adhesion of future coats, and so their appearance isn't exacerbated by ...


8

The bumpy feeling you describe is probably the wood grains raising up after applying your varnish; especially if it's a water based one. I previously asked a question about why it's important to raise the grain. Sanding between the coats shouldn't ruin your finish. Just make sure you use a high grit count and sand lightly. A typical rule of thumb is to ...


8

I use a solvent called Brush Cleaner. It works well on both oil and acrylic based paints. It is stout stuff so wear gloves and use it in an open area. You will have to soak it for 24 hours or so but that does the trick for me. Be careful to keep the bristles straight as they soak as they will tend to assume the shape they have been held at. If your brush ...


8

Did I doom my paint brush to the garbage or is there something I can still do to save it? Salvaging a brush with hardened varnish (or paint) in it is actually quite doable. It will require a long soak in strong solvent or a solvent mixture, as in many commercial brush restorers/cleaners and paint strippers. I don't think it matters that much which you use ...


8

How do I avoid or remove the scuffing? Basically you can't. Until you get to really high grits (way above P1200) you will see the scratches and these are not suitable for de-nibbing. How do I smooth polyurethane after it dries but still maintain its finish? In general you don't just sand, you then polish the surface. Wet-sanding will reduce the scratch ...


6

When I do this, even when I sand very lightly, like one low pressure pass with 400 or 600 or even 1000, the texture comes out nice and smooth but the polyurethane is always scuffed with little white marks. From memory, the directions I always see on cans of poly is to sand between coats, not to sand after a final coat. After sanding (fine grit sandpaper or ...


6

What is the difference between wiping polyurethane and wiping varnish? There can be no difference, they could be the same thing. Although note that sometimes "wiping polyurethane" refers to the application method, not the product used. What we call polyurethane or poly is a type of varnish, a fuller name for it would be polyurethane varnish although some ...


6

You could try using a chemical stripper to dissolve the varnish, as you would when removing this varnish from a table for refinishing. Be careful; many (but not all) of these formulations are quite toxic. However,it may be less expensive to replace the brush, especially when the value of your time is considered. Unless the brush is something of a family ...


6

Everyone has different standards for their health, but I would not personally consider this sufficient for working with oil-based polyurethane. It does not mention "organic" vapors or "VOC" (volitile organic compounds) anywhere on the packaging. The activated carbon might help with odors, but it hasn't been certified to do anything for your health. The ...


5

Unfortunately this is an it depends. There are some broad generalisations that can be made but waterbased polys have been steadily improved over the years (the early ones were pretty bad according to some accounts!) and now some have qualities that rival the oil-based counterparts. This, along with their inherent advantages, makes them well worth trying out ...


5

could I use gloss poly as the first coat and then top it off with a flat poly? Yes you can do this, in fact many good guides recommended that you do this. Where you want to build a substantial varnish finish (e.g. more than four coats) for a very good level of protection it's best to use gloss for the first few coats then use matt/flat varnish only at the ...


5

Before you try anything else, try "sanding" the surface with a piece of a brown paper bag. That is just abrasive enough to remove dust and smooth the surface without removing any significant amount of varnish, and is a lot easier than rottenstone or other more traditional polishes. Like any polishing/buffing process it will tend to eliminate tiny ...


4

Is low-formaldehyde plywood important if the wood will be finished with polyurethane? No, not in terms of the finishing at least. It's important if you want to make stuff that has low VOC emissions of course but doesn't appear to make any difference to how a finish dries, cures or maintains over time which is not surprising given the very slow outgassing of ...


4

As with any finish you need to use the appropriate solvent. For waterbased poly you only need to use water (warm water ideally) although soap and water will generally work much better to get a brush really clean. But from the wording of the Question it sounds like you're using oil-based poly, so use mineral spirits or paint thinner. Could I use ...


4

And also in a couple of places I have removed stain/oil back to original wood. Sounds like you sanded too far. You only want to do a very minimum of sanding between coats for the exact reason you stated. If you're getting nibs in your finish, the air in your shop might be too dusty. It's a good idea to do finishing tasks right away in the morning when ...


4

No. The purpose of stain is to alter the color of the wood. If you don't want to change the color of the wood you should not use stain. Polyurethane by itself is a perfectly acceptable finish.


4

My question is, should I route out the back before applying the stain and finish so that the groove left by the router is also finished Just on a technical front this groove being finished imparts no advantage to the piece. Non-view surfaces on wooden items are very often left bare and this isn't just small areas or interiors, the complete undersides of ...


3

your best bet for most even tone is to wipe off as much as possible using paint thinner/mineral spirits. Evaluate what things look like once the solvent you used has dried. If the color looks even/good, wait for the actual stain oils to dry, then apply the top coat of poly. If it doesn't look good, wait for what's on there to get good and dry, then sand it ...


3

Interior varnish used outdoors will certainly work to protect wood in the short term, but I don't think it's the right way to go here. One reason is that a film finish like varnish will tend to transfer if pressed upon with significant force over an extended time. While that might be irrelevant to the wood being stacked it will peel varnish from the ...


3

It is not necessary. Adding another coat of poly would make the finished project a little tougher and resistant to wear, but it also shines it up a bit more, which may or may not be an effect you are wanting. In the case of baseboards and trim, they aren't really going to see much wear anyway, so another coat isn't giving you much benefit. So as long as you'...


3

Water-based: Clear, non-yellowing Low(er) odor Cleanup with water and soap Applied with synthetic or natural brushes Oil-based: Amber/yellowing finish (darkens over time) Generally harder wearing Stinky Requires solvents to clean brushes; natural bristles recommended Longer recoat times Can easily be thinned with mineral spirits to make your own wipe on ...


3

I have used polyurethane a few times. Each time I've tried to be more careful about creating bubbles, but the finish was still riddled with bubbles. You're putting it on too thick (pun intended), and as well as that you're overworking the surface. Overworking with a brush is the classic way that bubbles are introduced into the varnish film on the surface, ...


3

I went away for a month and today I opened the can on polyurethane that is about 1/3 full and it appears to be turning to a 'jelly' like consistency. Is this normal It's not what normally happens with oil-based varnishes once they've been opened but it is one of the things that can occur. It's much more common for varnishes and oil-based paints to skin ...


3

Can I apply a finish safely over top of these wax patches? Given their size (10mm diameter is a pretty big wax fill for finish to bridge over) and that it seems there are quite a few I think there's a good chance that you might run into a problem down the line, even with the very hard composition of most wax sticks. However that's just my thinking and you ...


3

Ok, so I ended up gluing felt-backed flexible birch veneer with PL Premium, the 3X stuff. I also had a tube of 8X, but I could barely manage to get it out of the tube, forget spreading. Some notes: Takes a lot of adhesive -- surface area slightly smaller than two standard risers took more than 2 tubes of PL, so have a few extra on hand. V-notch tile trowel ...


3

I'm going to answer this question as if the primary question is intended: "is this a good way to treat pressure-treated lumber for indoor use" in case anyone else stumbles across this Q&A. The answer is no. Washing the lumber with water and bleach isn't going to do anything. PT lumber has been soaked or sprayed with a mixture of chemicals and then ...


2

Along with the other recommended chemicals I use a wire brush. Once you have soaked it and it is somewhat supple use the wire brush to clean it. Start at the handle and stroke down with the bristles. This works sometimes.


2

So, what kind of wood is it? It looks a lot like Red Oak. Still debating if I should use stain on it as it is making it too dark. I do not recommend staining the wood unless all finish is removed. Stains will only penetrate where the bare wood is exposed and unless the finish is fully removed the stain is likely to have a very uneven in appearance. ...


2

This looks like a classic case of surface contamination to me, where the varnish has crawled away from something it can't stick to and settled at the edges of the contamination. Although it doesn't usually happen on so large an area as this edge (often it's just tiny spots, the dreaded "fisheye defect") it looks a lot like the kind of defect you get if you ...


2

As a more general answer, all glues will include directions/instructions which will specify the working/open time (how long you have to get everything aligned and clamped), the amount of time to remain clamped and a full cure time. These times are approximates as temperature and humidity can play a role in the overall time, so assume the times given are ...


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