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34

There is also a bit for routers that can make what is called a finger joint. It makes many narrow interlocking 'fingers' to increase the gluing surface area. This was designed for joining boards end to end.


34

I assume you're talking about PVA glue. I think it just has a lot of desirable properties. Off the top of my head: Water-based and non-toxic (unless you eat it) - no nasty fumes or health risks. This also means that it is easy to clean off of benches, brushes etc. Dries quickly enough that you don't have to leave parts in clamps for several days, but not so ...


26

You can use a long lap joint here, but one of the standard ways to join two boards like this when cutting by hand is to form what's called a scarf joint. This is approved by the Federal Aviation Administration so if it is strong enough for airplanes it probably will suffice for your use as well. The key for FAA approval is 12x to 15x angle measured as length/...


24

Dowels and biscuits are length-preserving, cheap and common ways of generating some long-grain glueing surface. They're not quite as strong as other solutions, but usually entirely sufficient. For dowels, you only need a drill and transfer plugs (or a dowel jig, which is more expensive). If you don't even have transfer plugs, you can improvise them with a ...


22

Hoping to run into some more tests and calculations but this is a good start. Yes Clamps can be too tight and the joint could weaken or even warp, in a sense, if too much pressure is applied. I found this out by accident using spring-style clamps to repair a break in a board. I left it out overnight for the glue to set with 3 spring clamps keeping it in ...


22

This is really too broad for SE but at some point there was going to be a question that asked about wood glue generally and I think it makes a good reference point for future visitors so I'm going to try to answer it. But be aware that despite how long this is it's only a brief overview of the subject and not at all comprehensive. Some previous Q&As ...


19

Indeed, when done properly, the glue is stronger than the wood itself when both of the glued faces are edge-grain or face-grain. A few circumstances come to mind when glue alone is not stronger than the wood: End Grain When glue is applied to end-grain, the grain acts as little straws and draws a lot of the glue up the wood, away from the joint (similar ...


17

I picture a jig of the same diameter as the circle so that it can't bow out but I wonder if there are simpler ideas. Likely this would apply as well to other things and not just circles... other polygons with a large number of sides. Lots of people use ratchet straps to clamp odd shapes together: (source) These are nice because they apply a consistent ...


12

A couple of things to consider: If you accidentally spill glue on your pieces, the stain will not penetrate it. So, this argues in favor of staining before gluing. However... If you get stain on the joints, the glue will not work (or at least it won't work as well). I think things are typically stained after the fact except in rare circumstances such as ...


12

The problem appears to be that glue has sealed the pores of the wood, preventing stain from penetrating. In order to fix the stain, you'll first need to get to wood that's not sealed. I can think of two options: Remove the glue from the wood. You might be able to use a solvent appropriate to the kind of glue you used to loosen and weaken the glue, and then ...


11

Whenever I'm joining wood together, no matter what type of joint, I turn to wood glue. "Wood glue" isn't actually one thing. It's essentially a marketing term or selling aid more than a description of a specific product. For a traditionalist the words wood glue would actually call to mind hot hide glue and nothing else. And both epoxy and presumably ...


11

I remember hearing a while ago that sawdust and wood glue can be used as a wood filler to fill in gaps and imperfections. Yes you can do this, but note that the term "sawdust" might be slightly misleading here. Commonly when this sort of thing is done at home it uses sanding dust, not actual dust from sawing which would tend to have a range of particle ...


10

I prefer to tape up my glue joints, then stain / poly / paint. After that, fix any finishing boo-boos, remove the tape, glue up, and you're good to go. This provides the benefit of getting stain and/or paint / finish in all the nooks and crannies, allows you to fix any drips or bobbles in the finish with everything laying flat, and if you do get some ...


10

According to Titebond you should first try repeatedly tapping the container on a hard surface to loosen it up. Then you can thin it with water up to 5% of the glue's weight or volume. Regarding strength, they say: Adding more than 5% water to our glues will decrease the bond strength. This implies that thinning up to 5% will not decrease the strength ...


10

I have used ratcheting band clamps on curved shapes with very good results. ( I could not find an image using the clamp on a circular form, but the principle is the same.) Rather than applying pressure in a single direction it provides uniform pressure towards the center.


10

Why go through with all the hassle of combining two slim boards, and not just purchase and use a thicker 2x4? Cost Wood of smaller dimensions can be cheaper, cheap enough that two smaller pieces can be cheaper than the one thicker piece. This is one of the prime motivations to do laminations and glue-ups. In wood sales generally wider material is sold at a ...


10

If you're using most modern glues you do need clamps*, or some substitute, here. Hide glue is the one exception since it can be used to create rubbed joints. Although some people use PVA-type glues in this way in limited circumstances hide glue is the only adhesive that you can really do this with and achieve a proper result at a large scale (that result ...


9

it sounds like the consensus is that gluing end-grain just doesn't work well. It has long been acknowledged to be the weakest joint. However, that doesn't mean you can't or shouldn't do it, ever. The issue is actually whether it's strong enough, not strong per se. In a picture frame for example a simple glued mitre is not considered strong enough, and for ...


9

You might actually be able to fix this using white or yellow glue but it would be better to use a gap-filling adhesive. The simplest option for this is epoxy. Virtually any epoxy will work here, so buying the cheapest 5-minute epoxy you can find usually isn't a false economy (even dollar-store/poundshop epoxies are generally fine). You can use the epoxy as-...


8

Glue. SAND Stain/Finish I have had this scenario come up before and the best method I have found thus far is to clean as well as you can while you are gluing, then once the glue is set lightly sand the joints with a fine grit paper (sand evenly across all the board(s). I do this even if I do not see noticeable glue marks prior to finishing as I have ...


8

is there any other reason not to do it? If you really want it glued, there's no problem with gluing it. But the whole point of using threads instead of glue or a wedged through tenon is that you can disassemble a threaded connection. are there very good reasons to do it? Two, that I can think of: Although threads cut in wood are plenty strong for many ...


8

My question is, why use so many F-style clamps rather than just 3-4 parallel bar clamps that would cover the entire surface? Probably the simplest explanation is to spread the clamping force more uniformly. Although this can be done using fewer larger clamps too, with use of clamping blocks, which appear to be in the photograph anyway. Side note: I glued ...


8

I'm looking for some advice how to best join them. This will depend mostly on how much load you expect to put on the shelf and how you are mounting the shelf to the wall (if this is a freestanding shelf, don't worry about the mounting part). The simplest means would be to to a regular blued butt joint at your angles. This is as easy as it sounds - just ...


8

Almost every glue commonly in use won't take stain, and one or two that are said to stain don't stain as well as you'd like (similar story with 'stainable filler' incidentally) so it's good practice generally when glueing to take steps to prevent squeeze-out being left on the surface of the wood. The main ways people do this include wiping up the glue ...


7

I always glue up my stuff first, and I always sand all the joints after I'm done to make sure they are even and any glue that was on the outside of the joint is removed so the wood will take a stain and not be blocked.


7

I suspect that it actually isn't going to get any worse. However, what is generally accepted practice is to use epoxy. If you want to hide the crack and patch you can mix in some sawdust, in this case maple sawdust would be best. As an alternative, you could mix in some other colorful stuff to make it pop. Ground turquoise is a common choice for this. Of ...


7

Yes clamps can be too tight but not for the reasons stated above. TL;DR The fear is that over-clamping will lead to a starved joint is largely baseless. In practice it is nearly impossible to do without severely damaging the wood. Necessary clamp pressure has been studied extensively by scientists for the timber industry, who, unlike woodworkers, can't ...


7

It shouldn't matter. A 4x4 is just as strong with either side facing up. If properly glued and clamped, the glue joints on a long grain to long grain joint will be stronger than the wood itself, thus effectively creating a 4x4. GlueLam beams are almost always built with the individual boards laying face to face.


7

Needs to be food safe, durable and easy to clean. I know that beech is a good material to use as I have a beech chopping board at home, but would it make it even more durable / easy to clean by oiling the board e.g. with mineral oil? No. What it will do is introduce a 'finish' that never dries and needs to be topped up periodically for the entire service ...


7

This is not really an answer but a large comment that could point out several pitfalls that could have brought you to this point. I am not sure of the best advice for your situation as the warping looks significant. Like discussed in comments I think you might be better off starting over and paying attention to points below. Knots and Pith Depending on ...


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