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20

You can use screws, but in a slightly different manner. Instead of simply pre-drilling a hole and screwing the screw, you can use a router to create a slot with a countersink or counterbore bit. Source: LeeValley This slot will allow wood movement of your solid top while staying securely attached on your cross rails.


13

Tabletops are often attached to the frame and aprons using tabletop fasteners such as these, which allow for some wood movement: (Source) This is what they look like installed: (Source)


13

The wood in your top will expand and contract in one direction, while the cross braces will expand and contract perpendicular to that. There are a couple of different products and techniques that would help. For a set of rails like the ones in your picture, consider 'figure 8' fasteners. https://www.leevalley.com/US/Garden/page.aspx?p=50311&cat=3,...


11

For strength, a good glue bond is all you need. If you want to minimize clamping, you could use pocket screws, but I would recommend against it. When you tighten a pocket screw, it tends to pull the boards slightly out of alignment unless you first have the boards well clamped, and if you already have them clamped, why bother with the pocket hole screws? ...


8

To expand upon @keshlam's answer, you're going to want to purchase a chamfer or low angle bevel bit. Amazon (among others) sells a 60-deg bevel bit (pictured below), and chamfer bits can be found at just about any woodworking supplier. You will notice that this bit has a guide bearing on it, which is crucial for the bit's function in this type of operation....


8

@bowlturner gives some excellent suggestions. Let me just add a few things: Be sure to use cauls. They are pieces of wood laid across the top of the boards being joined to keep them aligned (and to spread clamping pressure). Make sure to alternate the position of the clamps. Have some clamping from the top and others clamping from the bottom. If you don't, ...


8

I would be quite concerned with wood movement in this design. You will be bonding epoxy (which doesn't move seasonally) directly to the end grain of wood. Since the wood will be expanding and contracting but the epoxy won't I would expect one or the other (or both) to crack or buckle. I would suggest either redesigning the piece so that the epoxy is ...


7

The ideal 'fix' for this is probably to saw the table apart (yes I know, *gulp*) and flip a few of the boards over, But going with what you have, two very traditional methods that were used to help keep tabletops flat were screwing the top to battens on the underside and breadboard ends. As a solution to your current obviously the first is more easily ...


7

Ive looked everywhere for table legs which I can screw into the wood but every table leg I see needs a minimum depth of 25mm for the wood, whereas my wood is much thinner at 18mm. For my Imperial unit friends, 25mm = 1", and 18mm = 11/16". Assuming you want to keep this as simple as possible, is there any reason you can't screw through the top of the table ...


6

18mm isn't actually particularly thin, many smaller pieces use 1/2" material (roughly 13mm) for their tops and numerous sizeable tables have tops 18mm thick or less. For tables, legs are almost never truly attached directly to the underside of the top, they are most commonly attached to something (a batten or a mounting flange of some sort) or made into a ...


6

Do pocket hole screws allow for proper expansion and contraction in planked table tops? It completely depends on where they're sited. They're perfectly acceptable in some places and utterly wrong in others. Refer to this previous Question, What general considerations do I need to take into account for wood movement? for more info on that regard with some ...


6

Well I would tend to use my biscuit joiner to join all the pieces. Try to avoid flat sawn pieces in the middle of the table top and if you have flat sawn lumber then make sure you alternate the orientation, you want one up and then one down etc it will reduce the overall cupping motion across the whole top. An alternate that could be done is to run the ...


6

I'll preface my comments by saying that finish choice is a very personal thing, what one person is comfortable using and living with (in terms of upkeep and periodic maintenance) another would not. And equally the second person's preferred finish will often not suit the first person's. The surface of the table is roughly 8x4 feet, and I'm worried about ...


5

Typically there will either be cross pieces underneath, or "breadboard ends", to keep a tabletop flat. Either way you have to allow for wood movement as the table expands and shrinks across the grain, which means the crosspiece gets attached in such a way that the top can slide relative to it, eg by screws going thru slotted holes. You'll notice that most ...


5

There are several issues to address in fabricating such a table top. First, as you pointed out is wood movement. The plywood base will not have any appreciable movement in either direction while the pine planks will expand across their width. If the two are attached, the difference must be made up at each board, where it is very small. I suspect that is ...


5

will pocket hole screws allow the table to expand and contract as it is supposed to? I'm assuming you built something that was fastened together along the lines of this (source) where you used pocket screws to attach the individual boards together. You mentioned that you are switching to more movement-capable fasteners to attach the table top to the base,...


4

Table slides are those pieces of wood that join the two halves of a table and support the leaves. The bigger the opening the more pieces necessary for each slide (Normally two slides per table, each made of two to several pieces of wood that mate in dovetail slots and rails.) The slide set shown here employs rack and pinion mechanisms to assure that the ...


4

I was wondering how I could make a table similar. You can't really, and shouldn't try. Making a table that looks similar is easy enough, but actually laminating solid wood to plywood is inherently a flawed methodology. Even when you do this with veneer it can cause bowing if it's not done correctly, and veneer is extremely thin, so it's easy to imagine the ...


4

11/16" works out to 17.5mm and although that isn't beefy for a table of this size it doesn't seem too thin to me. Many tables have been made with tops are under 1" (25mm) thick, although the ones I'm thinking of are made from hardwoods which can be significantly stronger than SPF. But this is being very generic, which unfortunately the descriptor "SPF" is ...


4

It depends on how heavy your base is going to be as that is the weight it will need to be able to hold when you pick it up but as long as you you use enough z clips to securely attach the top to the base you should be in the clear. Also I would make sure that you do not go any thinner than 11/16-3/4 as then you could run into some problems but to be safe you ...


4

left it to dry 24 hours. First thing, I don't know if Ikea make a selection of oil treatments but going by the one that's most commonly used this won't ever dry. If the oil is based on mineral oil (it might even be nothing but mineral oil, which could be purchased much more cheaply elsewhere) when the instructions say something to the effect of "leave to ...


4

Much useful related info in these previous Questions: What is a good way to prevent jointed tabletops from bowing when tightening fasteners or the glue sets? Do pocket hole screws allow for proper expansion and contraction in planked table tops? Pocket screws are a fast-and-dirty way of joining wood. Where speed is of the essence or clamp numbers are ...


4

Bob Flexner says it is unnecessary to finish both sides of a table top: ...finishing the undersides of tabletops or the insides of cabinets or chests has only limited impact on reducing the likelihood of future problems. The only reasons to go to the trouble are for looks and feel — both of which are perfectly legitimate. But neither has anything to ...


4

Epoxy will work as mentioned in the comments. There are two other possibilities I can think of. One is to drill out the area where the threaded inserts are and glue in a dowel. Once that glue is cured, drill the proper hole to fit the threaded insert. This is a good general solution to many situations where a screw no longer holds. The other option is to ...


3

Why it's not widespread? A grooved surface can only act as drainage if it is installed at an angle. And a sloping bartop might not be that popular with patrons! If it's not at a suitable angle it will act to collect the water and just allow it to sit there, also extremely unpopular with patrons I would guess, plus it would make it much harder to wipe ...


3

Common solution would be a router with an edge-guided bit.


3

In order to determine how and where to fasten wood parts together remember that wood expands and contracts differently in length (tree vertical), radially (from center to outside) and tangentially (generally parallel to growth rings) due to factors like temperature and moisture content. For most woods, change in length is negligible and radial movement is ...


3

Wooden dowel. No need to overthink this, dowel is used as the pivot pin or axle in many a traditional design and it can work very well even in cases of sustained use. Pick a strong hardwood (e.g. oak, beech, maple) and it's likely the pivots will outlive your need for the outfeed table. To prevent rubbing against the framework you'll probably want to ...


3

My main question is this. I plan to use 1 1/2" nominal boards in the middle of the table to reduce weight and material costs. If I miter a frame around the thinner boards with the 3" stock and join/glue it all together, will the thinner boards expand/contract at a different rate and cause the top to crack or warp?. Thinner and thicker boards expand equally ...


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