9

I used a belt sander to remove most of the finish of some old tiger oak flooring before running it through the planer. 80 grit sand paper is cheaper than blades. But I did keep a set of old blades to use for the first pass on all of them. A metal detector is a great investment if you'll be doing a lot of reclaiming.


9

It will be a lot of work but I have two different suggestions. Use your stain remover again, but this time be more specific and use an (old) toothbrush to apply it and 'clean' it back off when it is time. A toothbrush can can work the remover into the small places and can work just like getting plaque off your teeth. If it's mostly gone, you can try the ...


8

Since they are very old, they are most likely lacquer or shellac. As previously noted, test for shellac with DNA, lacquer with lacquer thinner. If those don't soften the finish, then it's probably a phenolic or alkyd varnish which will require stripping. Here is a good article on refinishing by Bob Flexner.


7

Sorry cannot comment yet, other wise I would have commented on Bowltuner's. Take Bowltuner's drill idea, but use a common 3/4" hole saw instead of a standard drill bit when the saw portion cuts in to the wood, remove the center drill from the hole saw. This will protect the screw head better from damage due to your drilling. Still use tape as a depth ...


7

The answer is, it depends. Finishes that "cure" after drying (like most oil-based products) will typically not be damaged by incidental contact with their solvent. Finishes that only "dry" but do not cure (like shellac) can be removed with their solvent more-or-less indefinitely. In your question specifically, water-borne products are not water soluble ...


6

Ouch. If he did a good job gluing, then the best idea I can come up with would be to drill holes. On the inside of the drawer, try your best to line up with the where the screws should be holding the handles on. I'd take a 1/2" drill bit and drill down through 'most' of the inside board, I would guess the board is either a 1/2" or 3/4" board. so drill to ...


6

Whether a peice of wood is worth it depends on how you are going to use it. If you want it for inlays then you don't need much viable wood. You just need enough to cut of the piece you want with a scroll- or band-saw. If you want to build a cabinet out of it then you will need a lot more. You can scrape of the finish with a chisel. Sharpen it and hold it ...


6

Reapplication and mechanical manipulation are your friends (as suggested above). If this is critical project, then there are a number of more extreme paths. a second round with a different product may help. your stain remover may come in a thicker solution or a gel. This will slow the evaporation time and thus lengthen the time the goo is removing stain. ...


6

It depends on your goal. The "right" way to fix it would be to strip the old damaged veneer and re-veneer the piece. If it isn't a valuable piece and you don't want to remove and redo the veneer, there are a couple potential options depending on the type and amount of damage. veneer is worn through somewhere in the middle: carve out the defect and inlay a ...


6

If you're starting from scratch without question the most inexpensive way to remove old paint (most finishes in fact) is using a scraper of some sort. Scrapers generally last you the rest of your life, so even if they cost a lot more than they do they'd still work out most cost-effective and outright cheapest. That said, I don't think using a scraper is ...


5

I'd like to re-finish them, without fully stripping them first. Can it be done at all? Can I just wipe something like wipe-on polyurethane on them? Sure, you can do that, but it will probably look like junk. Long story short, there is no shortcut way to refinish wood. All forms of refinishing (that look nice, anyway) will require removing the existing ...


5

If you are not interested in saving the handle, you can use a Dremel or other small cutoff tool to cut the handle in half then unscrew it from the mounting screws. Once you know the exact location of the screws, you can drill through from the other side as suggested by Bowlturner and remove the screw.


5

There are special spools of abrasive material that is almost like a sandpaper shoe lace. That might be worth looking into for sanding the stain out of intricate designs in some cases. (source: mitchellsabrasives.com)


5

Paint it, or pull off the hardwood edges, veneer over it with a new piece of veneer of the same species, and then apply new edges. Depending on if you have multiple other matching finished end conditions, you could create a new trim detail that covers over the affected areas. It looks like he face screwed, and then filled the holes with epoxy filler or ...


5

That looks like a "partial-wrap inset hinge". Places like Lee Valley have them.


4

Can you as a home owner do this? Yes, absolutely! The easiest way is to buy a stain finish combo. Miniwax (and many others) have a stain and poly or stain and some other finish mixed together. What is great about this is that it is treated similar to a paint, you can brush it on, it generally has a shallower stain but usually pretty even and so takes a ...


4

Since stain gets darker the longer you let it sit, you'll want to keep the time the stain is on consistent. The biggest advantage to doing it all at once is that you can develop a rhythm to it. If you need to break it into sub-projects, there shouldn't be any issue with that, you may want to use a timer to keep track of how long the stain's on. It's ...


4

You can test the finish by applying different types of solvent in an inconspicuous location on the piece of furniture. For example, you can remove Shellac with denatured alcohol. Bob Vila's website outlines a few common solvents that work for certain finishes in an article about removing varnish. Some types of finish, like lacquer, burn into the existing ...


4

I'd like to re-finish them, without fully stripping them first. Can it be done at all? Can I just wipe something like wipe-on polyurethane on them? Yes and yes, but there are no guarantees about the results and it is dependent on a few specifics. Of course the first job would be to thoroughly clean the surface. Any grease (and there will be grease on them, ...


4

Could I use a high grit or wet sand paper to knock the finish down where it's smooth enough not to catch the duster? Yes sand it, but no need to wet-sand or use a particularly high grit. If you were 'flatting off' and buffing/polishing the surface you'd want to do that (both wet-sand and go up to a high grit) but you can't in this case with the piece in ...


4

It really depends what type of finish you're looking for. The most common method I've seen is to paint the entire piece, let it dry, then sand through the new paint in a few places for a distressed appearance. You could also paint the whole piece, but wipe off the new paint in some places before it dries. Or, before painting, you could rub wax in a few ...


4

Depending on how damaged the wood fibers are, you might be able to salvage at least some of it by dampening the area and heating it to swell the fibers. This is commonly done with a wet cloth and hot iron. Use the cleanest cloth and water you can (DI/distilled if possible). Lay the cloth on the wood, then press it with a hot iron. Check your progress every ...


4

how do I identify what the finish is that was used here, so that I can identify the proper repair? There are some test you can perform to narrow down or identify the finish used on something. Sometimes a good educated guess can be right on the money, pieces from the right eras will inevitably be finished in only certain things (shellac before a certain date,...


3

I am not talking about a glaze that gives a slight tint and then collects in the seams and cracks, but an overall color change with hints of the earlier paint. This is very easily achieved using one or both of these techniques: wiping and abrasion. The first is simply to selectively wipe at the paint as you apply it, with your brush or roller in one hand ...


3

Fixing the MDF: I'm planning on mixing a glue/sawdust/wood-filler/mdf/sawdust mixture up, clamping the board in place, applying the glue, letting the glue dry, removing the clamps and board, and then sanding it down. This will likely work fine as far as making a cohesive fill that's strong enough. I've repaired small defects in MDF and hardboard in much ...


3

There are two ways: chemical, and physical. chemical: use paint stripper. if there is still finish left on the body you'll want to test this in an inconspicuous spot to make sure that finish isn't affected undesirably by the stripper. physical: get in there with blades and picks to pull out the paint. You'll ultimately probably need both - using small ...


3

Binder isn't a good word here as in coatings that means the stuff that bonds pigment particles together in paints, e.g. linseed oil in simple oil paints, acrylic/vinyl/styrene suspension in wall paints (US: latex paint, UK: emulsion paints). When shellac is used in between finishes to help with adhesion or ensure compatibility it's sometimes referred to as ...


3

I worry that the finish will either dull the blades more than unfinished stock would or that the finish will accumulate on the knife edges, dulling them and be difficult to remove. Assuming the surface is clean (no grit etc. embedded in the finish) I think the risk of direct dulling is only theoretical, because although a few finishes are very tough or ...


3

The odour from waterbased finishes can sometimes be surprisingly strong and pervasive, but there's usually little cause for concern because the ingredients are relatively benign, and certainly the VOC load is just a fraction of that from an equivalent oil-based finish. But, what you're smelling in each case are completely different things. Is she right ...


2

Sources: boat yards, Re-Store, yard/estate sales, furniture warehouse 'broken corner', curbs the night before trash day, rural antique stores, old condemned houses especially in historic areas, rural woodshops and lumber mills. (Most important rule: keep eyes and ears open for opportunities.) Tools: metal detectors to find nails, grinders (4.5" KwicCut 24 ...


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