Hot answers tagged

18

A quick google search found me this website, which has a nifty compatibility chart that I've attached below. Cole-Parmer has a very comprehensive compatibility chart for many solvents (organic or otherwise). For some common solvents, I've summarized some info from Cole-Parmer: Turpentine is no good for ABS plastic, brass, EPDM, LDPE, rubber, neoprene, and ...


17

I think the link in LeeG's reply covers all the necessary steps but just to have it spelled out here. Good surface prep is very important, imperfections 'telegraph' through paint very easily so the more perfect you can get the surface initially the better. The flatter the starting surface the less paint you have to use too, so it does have both time and ...


12

I have used this guy's technique before and it works great. Basically, you apply very thin coats, then sand to about 400 grit, and after that, do wet sanding to about 2000 grit, and then switch to the polishes. There is a pretty complete step-by-step here


11

Assuming that it isn't lead-based, I would probably tend to use an old set of blades if you have them. Some of that paint was incredible. I would recommend running all of the boards through on an old set of blades at the smallest cut to take off the paint. If it isn't a latex based paint it will likely ruin a set of blades. Basically you just want to ...


11

When I don't want to make messy marks, it's blue painter's tape all the way. (There are various options, in terms of how long you can leave it on. Just remember to peel it in time.)


10

Sanding?, priming?, painting?, other? break sharp corners: Sharp outside corners are easily damaged, and they don't hold paint as well as not-so-sharp corners. You can "break" the corners with a sanding block or just some sandpaper held in your hand. A router with a small-radius roundover bit works really well -- I use a 1/16" radius bit. prime before ...


10

What you want is called a "wood graining tool": The basic idea is to use a darker color stain on top of a lighter color. You rock the tool back and forth to create the knot look of real wood grain. This is commonly used to apply gel stain to a metal or fiberglass door to give a wood look, but can also be used in other situations. There are tons of videos ...


9

Shellac primer is the way to go maybe more than one coat and you should allow it to cure, which is different than drying. I use spray cans of this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Zinsser-1-qt-B-I-N-White-Advanced-Synthetic-Shellac-Primer-4-Pack-271009/205421238?cm_mmc=Shopping%7cBase&gclid=CJP986HPzsYCFQ-PaQodAm0B7g&gclsrc=aw.ds Spray the spots that ...


9

If I paint the edges of an oak plywood sheet, will it hide the layers well enough to not show through the paint? If you're asking whether you will only see a flat, smooth base below the paint (like you would expect when painting drywall), the answer is no. No matter how well you sand the plywood edge, you will still get some of the layering/imperfections ...


9

Cleaning starts before you use them. Get the brush fully wet with whatever solvent your finish requires (water, mineral spirits, etc). This will help prevent finish from drawing up into the tang of the brush. Clean the brush immediately after use. For water based finishes, wash with warm water and soap (I use dish soap such as Dawn). Work the soap into ...


9

This isn't very answerable, as suggested by the comments you are getting. But we can make some general statements about this project. First of all, whatever you are doing right now: stop. Put the tools down and take a step back. Again, the comments are telling you that at least some of your assumptions are wrong. It is very rare that "refinishing" would ...


7

When we stripped the paint in my house growing up we used a heat gun and paint scrapers. It was tedious but fairly effective.


7

TL;DR warning. Rinsing is, usually, only the first step in brush cleaning. Many paints and varnishes will state on the label that brushes should be washed after use and if this advice is followed properly you'll never have a brush dry stiff or hard. You don't need to beat yourself up about your brush having dried hard, it has happened to almost everyone at ...


6

This is actually a very common occurrence in woods like pine and fir. Many would suggest that you do not use these woods for reasons just like this one. If you persist then heat is the solution. Note: this is based on untreated wood. Not all lumber is kiln dried and even if it was you cannot guarantee the temperature it was dried at (or duration for that ...


6

They have been painted though and I'm looking for a method to remove the paint, and let the natural wood stand out instead. I live in an apartment building that used to be a large furniture factory. The building is all exposed brick and heavy timber framing. If you look closely at the timbers, you can see evidence that they were painted at one point but ...


6

This sort of repair is doable, but fair warning, getting a truly seamless repair is challenging to extremely difficult (read: nearly impossible without experience). the same black satin look. First thing re. the surface finish, in the photos the piano looks not satin but gloss, which is what one would expect on a piano. Satin more normally refers to ...


6

What type of water based paint makes the most sense for durability and ease of application? (Acrylic? Latex? Waterborne Enamel? Waterborne alkyds? Something else?) Yes. Sorry, couldn't resist. The truth is that nearly anything will work for this, from the old-school choice of milk paint to the most modern waterbased formulation. There's no need to overthink ...


6

If you're starting from scratch without question the most inexpensive way to remove old paint (most finishes in fact) is using a scraper of some sort. Scrapers generally last you the rest of your life, so even if they cost a lot more than they do they'd still work out most cost-effective and outright cheapest. That said, I don't think using a scraper is ...


5

There should not be much to this. One of the main advantages of MDF is that it is paint ready. There are still some things you need to consider where the drawbacks of MDF come into play. Rob brings these up in his comments so I mention them here at an attempt of completeness. Weight - MDF is very dense which makes it heavy. Depending on the thickness you ...


5

I think your best bet would be to use dry ice blaster. It is sort of like sand blasting, but the way the dry ice works is it will destroy the paint and evaporate into CO2 before it will harm the sub-structure (meaning the wood). The information on the page says: Dry ice blasting: is a non-abrasive, nonflammable and nonconductive cleaning method ...


5

I've found that pickling agents and scraper are a really ugly matter (and probably unhealthy even though nowadays it says "bio" on the label) and success is, well, mildly impressive. It's more impressive what drops of that nasty crap do to anything you don't want pickled (including tools and clothes). The plane surely does the job (tried that once) but it's ...


5

I'm not certain what look you're after exactly without a pic as guidance but I'll suggest a couple of alternatives. Note: in both of the suggested approaches below the filled areas will become visible. The first approach is to create a look similar to liming and you actually have a good start with the white paint you've already applied. You sand (or ...


5

A paint chemist might have a cow over my answer, but I will give it a try. Regardless of what finish you put on the wood, the surface must be dry. In order to bond with the wood, the finish must be absorbed. If the surface is too wet an oil based finish will be rejected (oil and water don't mix). If the finish is water based the excess water in the wood ...


5

Do these photos and observations provide enough information to identify the type of paint (Acrylic, Oil, etc.)? If so, what is it? If not, how do I acquire the other information needed? I'm afraid not, some years ago it would have been a bit easier to guess but these days there are a great many types of paints available (a few distinct types, numerous ...


4

It seems nobody bothered to mention French Polish. Sigh. That is the standard piano finish for quality pianos, period. French polish is a series of steps that fills and smooths surfaces using shellac. Over a stained and filled (grain filler) prepared surface: The first step uses rottenstone (like pumice) mixed with 1/2 lb or 1 lb cut shellac; rottenstone ...


4

I've sent painted wood through my surface planer and did not notice any particular dulling effect. This was typical interior latex paint; perhaps another type might behave differently. I suspect that the largest dulling effect would come from dirty painted wood rather than simply painted.


4

It is said (by Bob Flexner in his book "Understanding Wood Finishes") that shellac is the best overall sealer. It can also be used between any two other finishes to prevent them from reacting with each other. I have no experience with sealing sap into the wood but his statements would lead one to believe that it would work. At any rate, it is very easy to ...


4

I only have one set of knives for my current planer and will soon be installing a helical head. I know a lot of people switch to an old set of knives to clean off paint, but I've also thought about dedicating a cheap, old lunchbox planer to paint and dirt removal. If you have a lot of reclaimed lumber to process, using an old set of knives or a dedicated ...


4

Correcting after it has occurred: only solution I can think of is to re-seal (shellac's single nicest feature may be that it sticks to both water- and oil-based finishes) and repaint (might be able to get away with just painting that area, feathering out the edges of the new paint to blend it with the surroundings). Previous owners of my place solved this ...


4

What should I have done to try and prevent this? Instead of shellac-based primer as already recommended (although very effective it can be inordinately expensive) I was actually going to recommend shellac itself, but then I read you'd already tried this and it wasn't effective. However, I think the reason you got bleed-through wasn't a fault in the ...


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