Hot answers tagged

20

TL;DR warning. Sharpening is a deep and broad subject, with a lot of opinion and personal preference interspersed with the facts and science so be prepared to have to make your own mind up, i.e. choose your reality and stick with it! I don't think I missed an explanation as to why he chose to put that bevel beyond personal preference. Paul Sellers does ...


20

Obviously both of those cases are quite severe examples of edge damage, but even for single chips smaller than this re-grinding the bevel manually can be challenging. This level of edge repair is generally considered a job for power grinding. It is possible manually, I've done it entirely by hand on 'rescue chisels' using a combination of diamond plates ...


19

when I am levelling out wood with my plane, I get little pits (likely I suspect from the blade chipping against denser areas. This is called tearout, it is not caused by denser areas of the wood (in fact it can be common in softer sections of a piece of wood). It occurs when bundles of wood fibres literally tear free from the surface of the board instead ...


17

In Western woodworking at least low-angle block planes are favoured for planing end grain. These will generally give the best result, but any plane can do it if the iron is sharp enough and you take a very light cut. Terminology note: a plane's blade is traditionally referred to as an iron, in older books sometimes as the cutter. are there any gotchas ...


13

Using the aforementioned work table, I had placed other wood below the work piece, to prop it up, but could not get a tight fit so everything just moved around. I think a simple mod here could get this method to work (I've used something similar myself when planing thinner stock many times) although it wouldn't be the primary way I'd suggest you go about ...


12

Sharpening is a lot trickier than one would expect. In order to have a sharp blade you need to have two polished sides meeting one another: the back of the plane iron (or chisel) and the bevel. A couple of tips really helped me as I was sharpening. Sharpen up to 8000 grit. I used to have harbor freight stones and they only went up to 1000 grit--not nearly ...


11

Assuming that it isn't lead-based, I would probably tend to use an old set of blades if you have them. Some of that paint was incredible. I would recommend running all of the boards through on an old set of blades at the smallest cut to take off the paint. If it isn't a latex based paint it will likely ruin a set of blades. Basically you just want to ...


10

Note that I'm referring to metal-bodied planes throughout here, wooden-bodied planes are different enough that some of the generalisations don't apply to them at all. There are many lower-cost wooden planes that can match or exceed the performance of planes that cost ten times as much, and some that can match planes that cost upwards of fifty times more. ...


10

Although the manufacturer call this a Stepped Rabbet Plane this is a bullnose plane. Although their forms vary all planes with the iron bedded at a typical angle* and mounted in such a way that it's the leading part of the plane are in effect bullnose planes, intended for planing directly into a corner or the end of a stopped housing/dado. *Generally 45° ...


9

This is likely to be related to the direction of the grain: So you should pick the direction of planing depending on which way the grain slopes. Unfortunately however, some timbers (particularly some types of hardwood) have "interlocked" or "wavy" grain: The best thing I can suggest is that you get yourself a belt-sander as it's quite easy to remove these ...


8

Ideally you want a plane with the following: Critical: no cracks or heavy wear around the mouth it should not be missing any parts--e.g., blade, chipbreaker, cap iron, adjustors, body (of course) none of the screws or corresponding holes should be stripped or cross-threaded Highly preferable: Flat sole little or no rust no cracks, pitting, or chipping in ...


8

For end grain a razor-sharp blade is most important, and you can skew your cut to slice the fibers rather than chop them. The type of plane isn't particularly important, but one with a low cutting angle works best. For instance, you can use a low-angle block plane or a bevel-up jack plane with its blade sharpened to a low angle. You can also convert a ...


8

Many videos and tutorials from the much respected internet woodworkers show them always going from a coarse medium through to a fine. I think there are three key things here. With respect to a few of them, the category "Internet woodworker" does not in general mean you're getting info from the best and most experienced craftsmen. Always worth bearing that ...


8

So I was wondering if an electric planer would do a better job at making those edges straight? Yes. In addition to being far far faster it is much more likely to result in straighter edges. It's possible a planer could straighten the edge pictured in just one or two passes, the work of perhaps 5 seconds. Unfortunately details of how you'd do this work ...


7

You mention that you have a sharpening stone. One improvement might also be to make an angled guard that you run atop the stone that helps to impart the proper chisel angle. Something like the below might help to ensure you get a razor-sharp edge at the proper angle.


7

I'm not an expert with hand planes, but the main difference I can think about is precision - how precise is the body (flat sole, square and parallel sides, uniform width), how precise are the blade alignment mechanisms, how precise is the mouth of the plane, etc. Precision of the plane should have a direct impact on user friendliness and the final result. In ...


7

What I want to know is how to identify different hand planes to know what I have and if they have any special uses. My go-to source for Stanley hand plane information is Patrick Leach's Blood & Gore webpage. Don't let the name put you off - he has a plethora of information about all types of Stanley-made tools. The planes were made during different ...


7

What I want to know is how to identify different hand planes to know what I have and if they have any special uses. Much like grfrazee discusses in his answer I'm afraid there isn't a good comprehensive site for all of these, so you'll have to do some research on your own for some of the lesser-known makers. Common/Uncommon Type Breakdown There could ...


7

I'm contemplating buying a jointer plane or a hand held electric jointer. Any recommendations? It depends on a few things, in my opinion: how accurate you want to be, how hard to you want to work, and how much do you want to spend. Accuracy Jointer planes can be amazingly accurate in the right hands. They have the ability to finesse an edge by ...


7

I'm not sure you're going to find a ton of woodworkers using these for fine woodworking or furniture construction, but they are commonly used by construction workers/general contractors for things like shaving down doors, evening out floor joists, etc.


7

And I'm wondering whether there is any task where it would really have an advantage over other tools such as hand planes, a thickness planer, a belt sander, etc. Electric planers are coarse tools for coarse work. As such, you won't see one used by a fine furniture maker for anything beyond the rough dimensioning of stock (removing gross amounts of twist, ...


6

Knots do in fact dull any cutter faster than the surrounding wood does because they are harder. Knots don't leave severe nicks though. The secret to good hand planing is to sharpen often - sharpness is the best thing to improve results. When encountering knots it is helpful to skew the plane a bit and approach the knot at an angle but having the blade ...


6

Unless there's enough rust to weld parts together or leave a surface pitted and uneven beyond repair, I've never had it be the reason for walking away from a hand plane. The first thing I check is the quality of the plane iron. Flip the lever on the cap and pull off the blade and chip breaker. Learn to do this quickly so that you can get it apart faster ...


6

Everything I've read says you need to clamp a waste block on the end of your board to prevent the tear out. It is even recommended to do this if you are using a router or jointer. By keeping the pressure on with a waste block it won't be able to splinter down the board. Source Of course the other option would be to plane toward the center from both sides....


6

One supposed advantage of a grooved, or corrugated, sole on a plane is to prevent the plane from "sticking" to the surface of the wood, similar to the way two panes of glass (or any two smooth surfaces) will stick together if there's no air between them. It was originally intended to reduce friction by reducing the contact surface without compromising the ...


6

Apologies in advance that this doesn't directly answer your question, however it is a solution to your current problem and will allow you to progress with your project, and provides a good opportunity to post useful info about joint strength. I would like to use this plane to strength glue joints for the side of a toolbox. This is not necessary for ...


6

How can I improve the results I get? Based on your pictures, I surmise that it's due to a combination of: Your chisel not being sharp enough, Planing against the grain, Not having the edge of your chisel slightly proud of the side of the plane body, and Taking too thick of a shaving with each pass. I find it hard to control the depth of cut, tapping the ...


6

Flushing the tenon There are a couple of ways you can approach this, but it is actually most common to take the projecting tenon down until just about flush1, and then planing right through (in the direction of the grain of the surrounding wood in case that's not obvious). As far as 'damaging' the immediate area by doing this it's not normally a problem ...


5

plane inwards from edges. chamfer the far edge and angle the plane. support the edge with sacrificial wood. use a shooting board.


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