11

To keep the surface appearing as raw as possible and protect against water, I would suggest mineral oil. It will not prevent any mechanical abrasion, but will look natural and non-glossy without altering the sheen (much).


8

Unfortunately there's no product that'll really do what you want here. You can certainly add protection but everything will change some aspect of the current appearance. A good oiling (with periodic maintenance each year) will add protection, it won't stop further degradation but it will limit it. However it will also significantly alter the colouration as ...


8

Based on your comment (i.e., you're more interested in the look than the feel), it'd suggest using a matte finish. Rich Lawrence suggested a water-based poly, but I'd actually go for an oil-based poly (varnish). Water-based poly's aren't very scratch resistant (I actually finished my oak table with a water-based and had to replace it within a few months). ...


8

Another option to consider is wax. In this case, butcher block paste wax would be a traditional option (which is edible/non-toxic, like the wax on apples). It has similar constraints as the aforementioned mineral oil. Paste waxes also come in various tints which leave an unfinished look but allow some slight modification to color of the table.


6

While Tung, Boiled Linseed Oil (BLO), and other hardening oils will provide some protection, non-hardening oils like mineral, olive, or vegetable oil do not provide any significant protection. Hardening oils contain resins that undergo a chemical reaction (non-reversible) within the wood. Naturally, non-hardening oils do not. Wipe on finishes like Danish ...


6

He also covers gluing end-grain (starting at ~5:20) and suggests making a "seizing"(at ~6:00), which is basically wood-glue mixed with some water to "seize" the wood before the actual glue-up. That's "sizing" and "size", see Gluing end-grain. To me it seems this seizing is just sealing up the end-grain pores with wood-glue. Yup, as you'll read in the ...


5

What do you think happened here? It looks like the water either got under the finish and caused it to bubble up/peel or the water partially dissolved the finish, which you then scrubbed off by accident. How can I fix it? If it's finished the shellac, you might be able to apply some new shellac and buff it into the existing finish. Otherwise, if it's a ...


5

You might wait until its pretty dry, and use some exterior caulk. You can fill hold B, and seal around the bottom of the stud on top of hole A. Not sure what this is for, but yes, over time moisture will be able to wick into the end grain through the holes. No it probably won't be drastic, or even noticeable for awhile.


5

Let me shortly explain my background on this topic. I completely sympathize with your desire to keep the natural wood look and color in wood projects. In my experience most woodworkers love the finished look. Whenever I hear a woodworker say: "And now for the most satisfying part: the finish", I personally feel I'll often see a beautiful modern looking piece ...


5

Usually with any stain of this sort removing the surface should reveal pristine wood. Normally you won't need to go down that far since neither watery nor oily things penetrate very deeply on long-grain surfaces. Since you intend to send it through the planer that should remove the affected wood.


5

I'm not sure this qualifies as an answer, but we might be talking about two different things here. Mills used to float logs in their millponds to minimize splitting and checking while they were being queued up for sawing. The idea is that it suspends the drying process, and logs can be sawn green even if those logs had to wait for weeks or months after ...


4

I used a water based polyurethane matte finish on an oak table recently. It gives a slight amber tint but is protective against water and alcohol.


4

I have use Clark's Cutting Board Finish which leaves the wood looking more unfinished that anything else I've ever used. Even so, it does darken the wood slightly (all finishes do). Like any wax, it is very easy to add more after the surface has been in use for awhile. It has a nice citrus smell which dissipates after 12 hours or so. I used this on ...


4

Check out "spar varnish". This is formulated for use in marine envirouments (a spar is a wooden member supporting sails such as masts and booms). These, at least traditionally, are oil based. Oils not only repel water but, to my best guess as a Chemistry teacher, should not want to interact with other hydrophyllic substances such as salt. This is also my ...


3

Would a high-duty varnish (e.g., spar varnish) be a good choice? In theory yes. In a thick enough coating (numerous full-strength coats) with no voids or pinholes, a varnish like this is essentially waterproof. It could last a long time in this setting although I don't know how the direct soil contact will affect it, to find that out you'd probably be best ...


3

On top of other concerns given in comments and answers like inevitable rot I would be concerned about your winter climate. I would be more worried about something like ice forming in those area and putting pressure where it was not meant to be. While doubtful of its significance there could be the potential of causing damage from expansion. Depending on ...


3

A matte or flat water based poly will give the closest look to no finish and provide a lot of protection. I recommend Target EM9000. It may leave the wood with a little bit of a wet look. I've not tested for it because I always want some color to the wood.


3

I've used Tung oil with good results. It is mildly protective. Keeps moisture out for the most part. If the wood is inherently soft, it doesn't do much to prevent marring though. It darkens the wood the tiniest bit, but doesn't make it look like it's got a finish on it. Here's the one I used, low gloss finish:tung oil Here is a table I used it on. ...


3

You might want to consider non-toxic alternatives: You could use plastic edging, possibly reinforced with stakes. You could choose thin, untreated lumber that you are willing to have rot. This would enrich the soil. Choose thin, narrow lumber, so that it does not leave behind a hole big enough to break someone's ankle. You could place a gravel border. ...


3

Buy pressure treated lumber. It's going to cost more than plain pine, but it will last significantly longer in direct contact with the ground, as that's what it's intended for. There's a reason that every telephone/power pole you see is that dark green color.


3

Are you certain you want an oil finish? Will you be using it as a cutting board? I know a lot of blogs/websites suggest an oil finish because it's advertised as food-safe, but all finishes are food safe when fully cured (except for led-based finishes). I just installed butcherblock countertops from ikea (see image below). I used a polyurethane (varnish) ...


3

Interior varnish used outdoors will certainly work to protect wood in the short term, but I don't think it's the right way to go here. One reason is that a film finish like varnish will tend to transfer if pressed upon with significant force over an extended time. While that might be irrelevant to the wood being stacked it will peel varnish from the ...


3

He thinks that the bed slats might warp if I don't use a sealer. A 'sealer' won't make much or any difference to this once the slats are fixed in place and in use. I use quotes above because the idea that we seal wood with a finish is widely misunderstood. Various finishes do protect the wood's surface from dirt to various degrees (even a thin application ...


3

Acetone is my go to for removing pencil marks - I'm not sure why you're having trouble with it. Perhaps the builder has left very heavy/deep marks? Water is fine to use on wood - I wouldn't leave it soaking in a bath over night, but it's fine to wipe down with water. The magic erase markers are also probably fine. They're mildly abrasive so you'll be ...


3

I don't know if it's okay to use Mr. Clean Magic Eraser to remove all the pencil marks on the bed slats since it uses water. And I always hear water shouldn't be used on wood. It's perfectly OK to use water on wood, many processes require you to wet the wood surface down with plain water or a watery liquid. And anyway Magic Erasers don't need to be used ...


2

I applied oil until the wood wouldn't soak it up any more. After that I let it sit for a few days with puddles of oil on the surface. I wiped off the excess. I don't know if this was the application method recommended on the tin but this is the wrong way to oil wood. The correct application method is to apply a generous coating, let it sit for between ...


2

You're kinda fighting a loosing battle. A high grade marine varnish such as Epifanes would do the best in terms of water and UV protection, but I doubt it would give you the look you want. Here's a link to some other alternative marine finishes. http://www.westmarine.com/WestAdvisor/Wood-Finishes


2

I think I would try cutting a groove into the inside edge of each frame member, maybe 3/8 deep, so that the edge of the Lexan is completely captured, front and back, on all four sides. You could do this at the router table; I'd do it in a couple of shallow passes. For the two pieces of your face frame that have exposed end grain, the grooves will need to be ...


2

In short wood is not the right material for this, I think you should re-think the requirements... coming to the inevitable conclusion that metal is very likely the way to go. Every fire-pit cover I can recall seeing was made from plate steel. But if I'm reading the following right you already have problems you'll need to address! a firepit made out of ...


2

Use Cumaru hardwood (aka Brazilian Teak or Golden Teak). My internet searching seems to indicate that this wood has a Class A fire rating and is as resistant as concrete to fire. This link includes a number of results from test data backing this up. The type of testing that these hardwood decking and siding species were tested for is commonly referred ...


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