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TL;DR In general, I would avoid turning to discussion forums when trying to find advice about tung oil as it’s very likely the person talking has innocently confused the product that they are using.  If you do enough research you will eventually find contradictory information about everything.  (if only there were a place where people could vote on different ...


7

he suggested that the wood needed to be treated with tung oil, even before I assemble the legs, in order to protect it from expanding and warping over time. No finish will keep wood from expanding and contracting over time. It's in wood's nature to do that, and there's nothing you can do to prevent it. Also, tung oil isn't all that great at sealing ...


6

REDUCING MOVEMENT Using finish While you can coat wood with a suitable finish to mitigate the effects of internal moisture changes as humidity goes up and down, for all intents and purposes consider it impossible to prevent it entirely. The finishes that do the best job at reducing the effects are film finishes, which as their name suggests literally ...


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My question is: is there a way to properly apply tung oil to the stained wood without removing the stain during the sanding process? Yup: don't sand. Drying oils are not a surface coating, they're a penetrating finish, so basically there's nearly no difference between sanding oiled wood and directly sanding the surface of the stained wood, which many ...


6

Something that nobody's mentioned so far is that if your stain isn't penetrating, you've got another problem. If there's a previous finish still on top of the wood, forming a seal, stain won't penetrate, and the least bit of sanding will remove it. 'Sticky stain' is a very common symptom for this. If that's the case, you might want to try to strip it ...


6

The sanding between coats is entirely for the keeping a smooth finish. Any bubbles or raised grain are knocked back. When I sand, I rarely pass the sand paper more than a couple light passes. then check for visual and touch cues to see if anything more needs some extra sanding, say a drip that dried. If you are sanding away the stain you are sanding too ...


5

If it's simply to continue the finish, couldn't you just compact those into the finishing process (e.g., roughly once a day for three weeks), then swap to the maintenance phase? It's possible this may work for some*, but not in my experience. The main practical issue is that as you build up the oil in the surface wood fibres with the initial coats the wood ...


4

What's the real story behind tung oil curing time? Like all things in this area there are complications and potential for confusion. As already covered, many tung oil products on the market aren't tung oil to begin with. Where you are talking about actual tung oil, there are then various types. The product container may not specify how, or even if, the ...


3

Is (pure raw cold-pressed) tung oil food-safe (for cooking utensils)? Almost certainly yes. Just to mention, almost any oil of vegetable origin would be as well. There's a small chance of individual sensitivity to the tung oil, as there is with so many things, but in general tung oil is not something that people react negatively to. I want to try ...


3

NOTE: This advice refers to finishing smaller projects with relatively small surface area, like bokkens (wooden training weapons). Tung oil is one of the best choices for these, however, that's not always the case in other applications, like large furniture (unless you know what you're doing). From my experience with pure tung oil, if you treat it like ...


2

Lack of tackiness was my diagnostic determinant on my first project using tung oil (presumably the real stuff - a quart-sized container from Rockler that cost $25, I think - so it was at least expensive enough to be the real thing). I was finishing a microwave cart for my parents' kitchen after applying two coats of Minwax oil-based wood stain. Following ...


2

Some of the contested information is probably due to manufacturers and woodworkers alike misusing the term 'tung oil' when what they mean is some combination of tung oil and another solvent and/or finish. Generally, pure tung oil isn't a great finish on it's own- it doesn't entirely harden, it takes a long time to not be a sticky mess, and it has to be ...


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Assuming this is pure raw tung oil* this could be nothing at all to be concerned with, occasional clouding is just something natural to raw oils. But as I say in my Comment above you do generally see it only when the oil gets cold so I don't know why you're seeing it now. I think ideally you should try to return this bottle to the shop and get a replacement ...


2

After doing a bit of research, it seems like pure/raw tung oil might do the trick. I'm going to discount its suitability for this below but I want to caution to be careful of user reports of tung oil's superiority to BLO as a finish because, to be frank, a lot of them are accepting its reputation on face value and have never given it any sort of proper ...


2

Much unlike linseed oil, tung oil is poisonous, containing terpene esters. That does however not necessarily mean that it isn't safe to use anyway. I would surely not drink it, and you should avoid direct skin contact while it's liquid. Irritations are not uncommon, and they are not necessarily of allergic nature, but also due to the poisonous effects. ...


2

Tung oil will cure perfectly well under a buffed-out layer of any wax polish. Wax finishes are very thin as normally applied and full of microscopic pinholes, making them extremely permeable, so the oxygen necessary for curing has no difficulty in getting through (just as water can). And I'll let you in on a dirty secret of wood finishing, nobody who uses ...


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Keep wiping. You might be able to keep your wiping rag in a jar with a lid. Keep it wet with the oil, and twice a day, wipe the surface with it to add another thin layer. The danger with not wiping is having a thicker puddle or streak on it. This will turn into a stripe of gummy junk. With most drying oils, UV light will hasten the drying. Note: ...


1

Would tung oil normally stand up to that kind of thing? No. Oil finishes just don't offer the protection that other finishes can (not will, can; it depends on how they're applied) despite any claims to the contrary from manufacturers/marketers and enthusiastic users. This is because oil finishes are inherently thin. Very, very thin. Most of the buildup (...


1

It's like honey crystallizing when it sits too long. Just warm it up and mix it. It will turn back into oil.


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What's sold as "wood conditioner" is also called "pre-stain conditioner" as mentioned in a Comment on a previous Question, and as the second name better implies they're intended to reduce/prevent blotching in blotch-prone woods when staining. You're not staining, so no need for 'conditioning' the wood beforehand. Also important to understand what "wood ...


1

New member to the forum here. Good advice from pervious posters. 1) My limited experience with maple indicates that it tends to blotch. If that bothers you, use a pre stain conditioner before applying the oil. 2) Regular Tung oil takes very long to dry and cure. Don’t apply polyurethane before waiting for a few days (week?)


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As clarified in the Comments above, you appear to have "Tung Oil Finish" which is not tung oil but a commercial blended finish*. As your dad indicated it is intended to be a standalone finish and provides decent protection, certainly enough for what I'd expect a desk of this sort to need (not like a coffee table for example) in a hard wood like maple. But ...


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key to work with pure tung oil is mix it with other oils. for example you can mix it with orange oil (1/10 ratio). it will smell better, soak faster (depends on wood) and dry much faster (3days max.) from my experience..


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I've used both BLO and Tung Oil. I prefer Tung Oil because its adds a warmth to the wood that BLO does not. I find BLO tends to make the wood look a little muted (at least on Walnut). When I get home, I can take a picture of BLO and Tung Oil side by side. In the mean time, you might want to check out Bob Flexner's book. As I recall, he compares the two side-...


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I don't think you'd notice much, or perhaps any, difference in the finished appearance switching from BLO to tung oil. This is partly going on general principles, where oils of similar types tend to give similar finish, and partly based on photos of pieces finished in both that I've seen. There's no basic difference that I can perceive. There could of ...


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