Hot answers tagged

16

I have something akin to an answer, but I might consider it more like advice. Rust begets Rust- purely anecdotal, but I feel like rust left unattended promotes more rust. I would first work to rid yourself of as much rust as possible. Things like naval jelly, baking soda and similar will be your friends. Moisture is the enemy - Whether it be your home, your ...


10

The surface should not have become sticky, which may be due to not wiping off all the surplus oil as the instructions say to do. You have to be very thorough doing this with any oil or "oil finish" because no oil should remain on the surface. Any oil that is left will either remain liquid or turn gummy/sticky. None will ever properly harden. Now that you ...


9

Referencing steps from the directions on the can and the Minwax website Let dry 4-6 hours. Then lightly sand entire surface with fine sandpaper (220 grit) to ensure an even finish and proper adhesion. Remove all dust. [My emphasis] The highlighted portion is part of the problem we face in the woodworking world: that even manufacturer ...


8

Silica gel packets won't work well if your tools are on shelving. They'll just dry out the surrounding air, which will be replaced by other moist air. But, if your tools are in boxes, silica gel packets will be fairly effective. Naturally, the larger packets are more effective than the smaller ones. I've always had good results with them.


7

Needs to be food safe, durable and easy to clean. I know that beech is a good material to use as I have a beech chopping board at home, but would it make it even more durable / easy to clean by oiling the board e.g. with mineral oil? No. What it will do is introduce a 'finish' that never dries and needs to be topped up periodically for the entire service ...


7

Technically hardwood comes from angiosperm trees, softwood comes from gymnosperm trees. So (mostly) if the tree has leaves it is hardwood, if it has needles it is softwood. This means that some 'hardwood' species can be a lot softer than 'softwood' species. Examples of hardwood: beach, oak, birch, balsa (which is very soft) Examples of softwood: spruce, ...


5

Needs to be food safe, durable and easy to clean. I know that beech is a good material to use as I have a beech chopping board at home, but would it make it even more durable / easy to clean by oiling the board e.g. with mineral oil? Is this still food safe etc? Is there anything else I need to watch out for with this? Beech is a fine choice for a chopping ...


5

Camelia oil. It is very affordable (around 15€ per liter), it doesn't stain, nor gum (nor smell, nor taste). It's not aggressive to the skin or otherwise hazardous to your health (in fact you could drink it, and you could use it as lotion and for your hair, indeed many high-quality body oils contain camelia). Apply a few drops with a dispenser and spread ...


5

WD40 is much better (I find) when not applied with an aerosol; get it by the litre and brush it on with a rag. That's my usual method, and it works fine (except when I forget). I do it every single time I'm going to not use a tool for more than a couple of hours. The smell is far less than when spraying the stuff. With wax, if you want to avoid having to ...


4

I agree with the all the suggestions to use oil. I glued a piece of carpet on a board next to my bench. Whenever I am finished with a tool - I squirt oil on the carpet and rub the tool against it. This is easy and saves oil. If you already have rust - I have found that the "SandFlex Flexible Abrasive Block, Fine Grit" - is excellent at cleaning up ...


4

One other common solution is heat. Heat your toolbox. Sometimes the tools end up being colder than the surrounding air and the moisture condenses on the tool causing rust, heating would solve this. Heating the air also lowers its relative humidity. This might seem like a weird solution but it is fairly commonly used to protect firearms. And one of the ...


4

Get the tools rust free by polishing with steel wool or scotch brite, wipe clean with oily rag-- leaving a very fine oily film, then apply a soft wax-- I have had good success with Johnson paste wax. If you can't ensure a low moisture environment, the wax film will do as anything else to prevent reformation of rust but leave the tool useable. If the ...


4

I'm not an expert with BLO but I have successfully used it on different projects, so here's my take. How do I know if a coat is thick enough? More thinner coats are better than thick coats. it will cure faster and smoother that way. I apply a light coat and if it is runny at all I wipe off the excess. How do I know if coat has set/cured? The ...


4

You can reuse solvents a few times. However, at some point the solvent will be contaminated by too much of the thing you're cleaning. At this point, your solvent is no good. I can't really give you any pointers as to when this is, but you'll probably notice when the solvent doesn't work as well. See this related Question.


4

Can oiling be the final step in finishing a project or do I need to throw a coat of varnish, or some other finish, on it? This is a subjective question. Obviously oiling alone is fine for some woodworkers, but it's not for others for reasons that go beyond practical considerations of expected use for the piece in question — aesthetics being such an ...


4

"Hot-coating" (applying a second coat of poly over the first without sanding) has become an accepted technique. It seems to work better if done right after the first coat has dried, perhaps because it's still polymerizing. After two coats, common wisdom seems to be to let it cure completely and sand lightly before doing another coat/hot-coat pair (if desired)...


4

Per your edit, you appear to be looking for e.g. Janka hardness, a standardized measure involving indenting a wood sample with a penetrator and measuring the force required to indent a standard amount.


3

To what extent, if any, can I reuse mineral spirits? As I touch on in a previous Answer, you can re-use rinsing solvents a few times. The larger the volume you work with the more you can re-use it. And it is well worth rinsing in a much larger jar than you would perhaps naturally go with; small jars should definitely be avoided even if you plan to wash ...


3

Are you certain you want an oil finish? Will you be using it as a cutting board? I know a lot of blogs/websites suggest an oil finish because it's advertised as food-safe, but all finishes are food safe when fully cured (except for led-based finishes). I just installed butcherblock countertops from ikea (see image below). I used a polyurethane (varnish) ...


3

With that in mind am I making the oils less effective by applying them over a stain? Broadly speaking that should be a no. Waterbased and alcohol-based stains leave the wood 'open', essentially as if it hadn't been stained. Oil-based stains do somewhat close up the surface (much as a layer of finishing oil does) but in general they're not recommended to ...


3

I would use so-called Danish oil (I have used Watco for decades). It has the matte surface that you are looking for and if it gets any dings or scratches, a little sanding will get rid of them and a quick recoat of the surface gets it looking as good as new in minutes.


3

Bluing is used to protect firearms from rusting, and according to that Wiki article, has been used to protect tools. I remember from my hunting days that we would have a bottle of bluing, and give everything a good wipe down at the end of the trip.


3

A colleague of mine has just come up with a good suggestion so I thought I'd post it as an answer so that anybody looking at this in the future could see it: Use a pre-made kitchen worktop. You can buy a 3-metre length for around £80 ($120ish) and it's already glued up dead flat and straight. Just be careful to get something that is solid timber and pay ...


3

Is (pure raw cold-pressed) tung oil food-safe (for cooking utensils)? Almost certainly yes. Just to mention, almost any oil of vegetable origin would be as well. There's a small chance of individual sensitivity to the tung oil, as there is with so many things, but in general tung oil is not something that people react negatively to. I want to try ...


3

It sounds like plastic on plastic, with particles tossed in for good measure. If you aren't concerned about opening the case, consider to do so while looking for fragments and particles that are causing this problem. Brush them out or blow them out of the area of the trigger. Once opened, application of a teflon (PTFE) or silicone based grease may provide ...


3

Yes you can absolutely use "teak oil" 1 in place of BLO. In fact I think if you did a direct comparison you'd decide that the results are superior, in all the ways you list — higher sheen (or at least more easily) and better surface protection. What is sold as teak oil can vary, because there's no standard for it in the finishing industry (as there isn't ...


2

I use Silicone lubricant, not WD-40. This is mostly for my table tops and such. March/April I go through my shop and use Silicone on all my metal topped machines (table saw, joiner etc) to keep them from rusting in as the moisture content in the air rises and the tops are still cold condensing the water and causing rust. One good thing about Silicone is ...


2

CRC food grade Silicone Lubricant is magic on any metal, Never leaves a mark and does not go away unless you want it to, They use this stuff in museums when long term storage with protection is of the utmost importance, Oil just dissipates eventually, I moved to this Lubricant and will never go back to oil for protection, I use it on knives, Swords, door ...


2

Teflon chain oil from Dupont provides a nice tough static and rust free film. It is used for motorcycle chains and has been time tested for not collecting dirt, rust and dust. Have to let it dry on the first application. Just need a small amount too. A bit pungent so spray in well ventilated place. Great for all kinds of metal in humid situations.


2

I applied oil until the wood wouldn't soak it up any more. After that I let it sit for a few days with puddles of oil on the surface. I wiped off the excess. I don't know if this was the application method recommended on the tin but this is the wrong way to oil wood. The correct application method is to apply a generous coating, let it sit for between ...


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