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8

As far as I can tell this is standard pine/softwood V-groove, tongue-and-groove flooring. This or something quite similar should be widely available where flooring material is sold. exactly as the blog author stated she did it Once you find your suitable equivalent product I would suggest a few minor deviations from the process described. The first is ...


7

This is not really an answer but a large comment that could point out several pitfalls that could have brought you to this point. I am not sure of the best advice for your situation as the warping looks significant. Like discussed in comments I think you might be better off starting over and paying attention to points below. Knots and Pith Depending on ...


6

I know cheap construction 2x4s can warp There are multiple possible causes for distortion in a glued-up panel like this. Often more than one of them are to blame, although there may be one major culprit. I suspect that's the case here. Since your tabletop ended up 'in wind' (twisted) and didn't cup or bow I think the wood itself is likely to be mostly or ...


6

Find a local cabinet shop or woodworking store that has a wide belt sander. My local hardwood supplier will run panels through their 50" wide sander for just a few bucks. My planer will handle a 13" wide board. If I need a large panel, I'll do the minimal amount of planing possible on the raw boards, then glue them into sub-panels less than 13". Once ...


5

Can anyone tell if eliminating the gaps between the boards on the siding might somehow hurt the integrity of this patio prep cart? Yes there could be a pronounced effect without specific steps being taken to compensate. If you look at the orientation of the boards on the door and the visible side panel this places the longitudinal grain horizontal. The ...


5

What I would like to do is implement some Tudor house design features since he just bought a Tudor home to start his family in. For those unfamiliar with the Tudor style of house (as I was), here's an example: (source) One way I would do that is by painting the trim a traditional Tudor dark brown and paint the panels a more cream color. In order for that ...


4

Is the humidity in your garage the same as the humidity in the room where the dresser is kept? You can start with a board with 0% moisture content, but regardless of the finish you put on it, it will take in moisture until it matches its environment. I know you can't always do this, but the best way to finish out the seasoning on your lumber is to put it in ...


4

I do some guitar building, and guitars happen to be just wider than standard planers. So, I build a planer sled for my router. Depending on your overall width, this could be useful for you. some pictures of my set up Flat plywood, with 2 square rails. Then I attached my router to a sled of plywood that is reinforced for stability. I was using a 1/2" bit, ...


4

Some additions to Graphus' answer from a luthier of 40 years. Not much gluing surface here, I wipe the edges with an acetone damped paper towel to remove residual oils, especially recommended on oily woods. When you true the edges, do them together. Clamp the two pieces face-to-face with the finish faces both inward or both outward. Clamp your very sharp ...


4

Here's the basic setup: Source: Guitar 101 blog. The boards being joined are a tightish fit even with that thin slat underneath the central joint, slide that out and press the two boards down flat and they are squeezed together very tightly. The two boards are held flat and prevented from tenting back up by placing a heavy weight on top or by using clamp ...


3

Glue up strategy was pipe clamps alternating on top and bottom every foot. I also used biscuits. Alternating clamps top and bottom is a good way to help achieve a flat glue-up, but if you want to be absolutely sure you need to actually clamp the top flat somehow. You can do this with individual clamp pressure at each joint being glued (using just a C-clamp ...


3

I have used cabinet scraper in situations like this. Get the wood lined up really well by using cauls to keep the faces in line, and a very sharp scraper to remove the glue lines. Scrapers are great at removing glue and planer marks (wash boarding) on smaller projects, it is labor intensive and the results are great.


3

I don't know your total woodworking skill and toolset, so I might be taking a bit of a leap with this Answer. The wall paneling you link to is EverTrue tongue-and-groove paneling. This has a generic profile, a sample of which I've pasted below (source: Vermont Lumber) This is actually quite simple to make yourself out of regular pine boards, if you have ...


2

Some things that could have happened: The reclaimed pine could have warped due to sudden moisture changes (ie. moving from damp outside storage to the warm, dry indoors without letting the wood adapt first) The boards may have needed to rest a few days to allow them to settle after planing The clamping down of the boards may have caused you not to notice ...


1

Just to answer the question in the title, yes you can use linseed oil and waterbased poly on opposing sides of board if for some reason you wanted to. I know that linseed oil and water-based polyurethane won't work together. Actually they can. After curing drying oils aren't oils any longer, the oxidation process has turned them into something else (a ...


1

In addition to the concerns in other answers addressing the selection, preparation, and arranging of the wood used in the top I would also suggest two design changes. First, the overall thickness of the top shown in your picture is only 1 1/2". A thicker top (3-4") would be much better resisting the internal forces that curve/curl the profile. Second, ...


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