Hot answers tagged

19

when I am levelling out wood with my plane, I get little pits (likely I suspect from the blade chipping against denser areas. This is called tearout, it is not caused by denser areas of the wood (in fact it can be common in softer sections of a piece of wood). It occurs when bundles of wood fibres literally tear free from the surface of the board instead ...


19

What are these and should I worry? This is called corning and yes it is something to pay attention to. Corning is distinct from normal clogging — notice the dark colour, as opposed to dust clinging to the paper which is usually very light. Corns are generally formed of either resins from the wood itself or a finish in or on the surface, such as varnish ...


17

In general yes, you will have a much nicer finish much faster by sanding with the grain. The larger the grit (60 vs. 100) will leave larger 'gouges' in the wood when sanding. The grit is an 'average' size of the grains and the larger ones can leave deeper marks. Sanding with the grain the marks are much less likely to cut across the wood grain, leaving ...


15

What sander should I use for something like this? You need tools that can sand contoured objects. There are a number of options, and given the varied nature of your work you'll probably use more than one tool. Here are some choices: flap wheel: Basically a wheel with pieces of heavy duty sandpaper or abrasive cloth inserted around the circumference ...


14

Don't make marks where they will show up on the finished piece in the first place. Prefer marking in places so the mark will be on the inside or use masking tape to hold the identifying marks.


12

This is a very good topic to have here since there is active debate going on in woodworking circles about the overuse of sanding to smooth wood in the modern era. How do both techniques compare? In terms of result, cost, applicability to different kinds of wood, different shapes of work pieces and cleanliness of process. Where possible scraping is always ...


11

I like a belt sander when I need to really remove some material like paint for example, I think it cuts better. an Orbital I like for finer sanding it offers a lot more control.


11

There are grain fillers which are often used on open grained wood like red oak to make it take a stain more evenly, using this on the end grain of a board should do the same thing. What you are needing is a way to make the end grain absorb about the same amount (which is much less) as the face. Using finer sandpaper on the ends will help a small bit, but ...


11

That's a great question. Typically, the purpose of the first round of sanding is to hide surface blemishes in the wood (e.g., machine marks, dents, scratches). The purpose of the subsequent rounds of sanding is to hide the scratch marks from the first round. Usually, you only need to go to about 180 before the scratch marks become invisible. As you mention,...


10

I'm working on a project that has a piece of curved (concave) crotch walnut...due to the grain direction of the crotch walnut it was very difficult for me to get a perfect surface finish. Instead of sanding, I would suggest using a curved scraper. When properly sharpened, they work very well on weird grain directions and leave an almost polished surface ...


10

It sounds like you need to replace the pad on your sander. This is the "hook" part of the hook and loop system. This is a typical point of failure for orbital sanders, so it should be fairly easy to find one. If you find you are going through them frequently (in addition to the steps in Rob's answer) you should consider using a "pad protector". This is ...


10

Stain the pieces separately before they're glued up, hoping that I don't have to sand through the whole stain to get the joints flush. Even the deepest penetrating commercial stains, applied in the normal way, don't allow much sanding so it's best to aim to do almost none after staining if possible. When it comes to flushing joints, even if you only have a ...


9

The fact that there is any warning at all probably has to do with the fact that the mask's rating is only FFP2 and it can only filter 94% of dust particles, whereas other masks can filter 99% or more. FFP2 also only requires <8% inward leakage, which seems like quite a significant amount of leakage. The reason the warning specifically mentions hardwoods ...


9

I understand it's a matter of taste vs effort Actually not as much as people tend to believe. Sanding to 320 grit may itself be too high, and above 400 you can definitely run into problems. Some woods burnish when rubbed with higher-grit papers and this can prevent the proper penetration of finish, which helps ensures a more even colour and the formation ...


9

It will be a lot of work but I have two different suggestions. Use your stain remover again, but this time be more specific and use an (old) toothbrush to apply it and 'clean' it back off when it is time. A toothbrush can can work the remover into the small places and can work just like getting plaque off your teeth. If it's mostly gone, you can try the ...


9

How do both techniques compare? In terms of result, cost, applicability to different kinds of wood, different shapes of work pieces and cleanliness of process. Good question. As a preamble to an in-depth comparison between scraping and sanding let me frame my answer in terms of 'surface preparation' which is what you are doing when you are either ...


9

This is likely to be related to the direction of the grain: So you should pick the direction of planing depending on which way the grain slopes. Unfortunately however, some timbers (particularly some types of hardwood) have "interlocked" or "wavy" grain: The best thing I can suggest is that you get yourself a belt-sander as it's quite easy to remove these ...


9

It wasn't until I noticed that my once tight-fitting dados were now loose that I realized that I almost sanded through the top layer of the plywood in my efforts to remove the marks. You're not the first person to do something like this striving to erase layout marks or notes from wood by sanding and you won't be the last. It's the kind of thing that ...


9

Referencing steps from the directions on the can and the Minwax website Let dry 4-6 hours. Then lightly sand entire surface with fine sandpaper (220 grit) to ensure an even finish and proper adhesion. Remove all dust. [My emphasis] The highlighted portion is part of the problem we face in the woodworking world: that even manufacturer ...


9

Be sure to check whether the hooks (part of the hook-and-loop) on the backing pad are intact (not melted) and not clogged, all the way out to the edge of the pad. Usually the hooks around the edge become damaged first. If this is the case, you will need to replace the backing pad or the sander. It looks like replacement parts for your model are readily ...


8

I would highly suggest a cabinet scraper. It is designed/used for this explicit purpose: smoothing the location where two separate pieces of wood meet, and smoothing their surface to be uniform. It is faster than sanding AND by its nature created a flat surface, where sander could create waves or organic and smooth surfaces.


8

Adding to glw some of it depends on the wood. Some woods I've used 220 is as good as you are going to get, anything higher doesn't do anything and sometimes actually makes it look worse. Pine and other softwoods really don't benefit much from higher grits. Red oak maxes out at about 320 anything higher and your just wasting your time. White oak is ...


8

Unless your hole is too large, you should use a hole-saw bit for your drill rather than a jigsaw. If you can't, then make sure you're using a fine-toothed blade and some sacrificial scrap to prevent tear-out. If you like extra work, you could sand first and make your cut, but no matter the precautions you take, you're likely to have a little-touch-up work ...


8

A lower speed can be desirable if you're sanding between thin coats of finish or thin veneers, and you don't want to sand through the current coat or the veneer. But many of the lower-end or homeowner-grade random orbit sanders aren't aggressive enough for it to matter. As with many tools, lower speeds on a sander offer more control, so you may avoid ...


8

Try "sanding" it with a brown paper bag. That will be just abrasive enough to knock loose any dust nibs. It may polish the surface, though; try it on an inconspicuous area first to make sure you're happy with the result. Warning: this may increase the shine of the surface; depending on your needs that could be either good or bad. (It did a fine job on the ...


8

Bandfile Belt Sander Not advocating any particular product but showing the product picture Image from Harbour Frieght That should help you get into the tight spots quickly and efficiently. Only issue would be the corners. For that I would use a small rotary tool. Hopefully you have one that will fit in there. Mine is a little too clunky to get into a hole ...


8

Personally I would have aimed for an internal milled finish that didn't require sanding, that's the ideal. Obviously too late for that now and I don't know if that's possible with the Shopbot and the bit you were using anyway. Instead of sanding to smooth the rough surfaces I recommend scraping. It will be faster, give a better finish and is more ...


8

To expand upon @keshlam's answer, you're going to want to purchase a chamfer or low angle bevel bit. Amazon (among others) sells a 60-deg bevel bit (pictured below), and chamfer bits can be found at just about any woodworking supplier. You will notice that this bit has a guide bearing on it, which is crucial for the bit's function in this type of operation....


8

If I were going into production, a dedicated special purpose sanding machine would seem appropriate. However, for the one-off sort of project that most of woodworking SE contributors are likely to do, good old hand sanding, coarse to fine, will probably work fine. The big issue is to make sure that when sanding deep in the throat near the end of the cut, I ...


8

You're correct that the planer can remove much more material at a time. With the planer, it is also simple to adjust the depth for removing more material in a pass. With the drum sander, you can change the grit of the paper to take off more material (nowhere near as much as the planer) but that is a more painstaking process. That said, I own a drum sander ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible