Hot answers tagged

13

I think the word 'safe' here might be relative. Just like modern cars are safe, when driven on the road, and obeying traffic laws. I think in this case the answer is a profound NO. Table saws are 'safe' when used for cutting wood that is against the table, and the stop, preferably using push sticks and a riving knife. I see none of those things going on ...


13

It's called Tearout. That is tearing the fibers. Most of the time when you see that the fibers of the wood are tearing out instead of being cut/sheared by the gouges. There are three thing that can cause this. One is the wood itself. Some species are a little more prone to this than others. Also wood that is starting to spalt or rot is more likely to ...


12

Wear safely glasses or a full-face mask every time you turn, no exceptions. Dust mask or respirator advisable normally but essential when sanding. Tie long hair back. No long sleeves. Take off rings, bangles, bracelets or a wristwatch. Consider whether it would be safer to remove any necklace, crucifix or medallion worn around the neck. Remember ...


11

A large part depends on what you ultimately plan on turning. However, this is the set I bought when I jumped into the hobby. 3 of them I almost never use even now. 3/16-Inch Parting Tool - used to 'cut' the work-piece off it's base. Once I got a chuck I use this surprisingly little but still a must have. 5/8-Inch Spear Scraper - like the round nose ...


11

Like anything it depends, but the list is fairly small either way. For the Lathe itself you can use almost any of them, though I would recommend at least a Midi-Lathe, the larger bench-top lathes. I would recommend at least 8-10" swing if you want more than finger bowls. There are many different options and price points. I started with a cheap Midi and ...


10

I think my biggest concern is that I don't have a good feel for how this system will behave. When I'm about to perform some action with a power tool, it's very deliberate, and I've thought through the type of bad outcomes that might result. For example (not a complete list by any stretch) Table saw: Kick back Miter saw: blade binding Band saw: blade ...


9

I'm wondering why metal lathes aren't used for [wood]turning. In my mind, it comes down to 3 Cs: cost, convenience, and creativity. Cost: From what I've seen metal lathes cost more than wood lathes when you consider similar capacities and features. This is not surprising given the additional tooling necessary to work a metal lathe. One might argue that ...


9

I can think of at least two options: use the template on a duplicator use the template to set calipers .... basically what keshlam said. The first if you have a duplicator you can use the template to make the shape. Most of us don't have a duplicator in our arsenal. The other is to use calipers to take measurements at key places. First you take and ...


9

That was fast. I broke down and called Jet tech support. The information was not in any of their product information and the support person needed to ask Development. I mentioned that the piece I was wanted to use was between 100-150 lbs. Development said that lathe could handle 200 lbs. easily, he didn't even have to look it up. So 200 lbs. is well ...


8

I have a relative who uses something akin to a steam box, without the steam, to control the moisture moving out of his green turned pieces. It is like a wooden cabinet lined with plastic, with small adjustable vents like on a cheapo charcoal grill. He allows them to stay relatively moist for a period of weeks, loosly wrapped in plastic sheeting. There is ...


8

There are gouges, which like you have displayed are made from curved pieces, bowl gouges, spindle gouges etc. of course the parting tool is what it is, though there are different sizes. skews - Angled on both front and back, can be straight, angled, or curved. scrapers, often round nosed but many different shapes available Then there are a whole host of ...


8

Just adding to Graphus's excellent answer. The piece of wood is the dangerous part. It is moving up to 4000 rpm depending on settings and lathe. you will want to take small cuts, being too aggressive is dangerous, especially for a new turner. Being too aggressive can either stop the wood, (which isn't good for the lathe) or try and yank the turning ...


7

They are bowl coring systems like this I bought this one and it has 4 different knife sets available for different sized bowls. They are pretty expensive and each knife set is bought separately. I like it but you need some practice and they really aren't for the beginner, you need to have practice attaching the blanks to the lathe securely because there ...


7

Almost universally people seem to suggest/imply that "better" tools are important and worth the price difference. That certainly used to be a worthwhile general shopping guide, one that is repeated in many early woodworking books that I've read (the same principle is repeated outside of woodworking circles too of course). But to be honest I'm not sure it ...


6

I think you've already hit on the best way(s) to remove the bulk of the material without going overboard on costs, but aren't using the right tool for the job. Drilling adjoining or adjacent holes I think are the best ways to approach this for the average user, just not using a spade bit. I'd probably use an auger bit in a brace if I had to do a job like ...


6

Yes, speed can make a huge difference. My first lathe was a PSI midi-lathe (not mini) and it required stopping the lathe, opening a panel, and switching the belt to another set of pulley's. A pain. However, you need to do it. While it is recommended to have it slower for unbalanced pieces (roughing it to a cylinder), speeding it up will make a lot of ...


6

Adding to Graphus's excellent and comprehensive answer. I have both the cheap PSI tools you linked to and the Crown Pro-PM Powdered Metallurgy. (as well as other misc pieces). I like both of them. Part of what makes a difference is what you are turning. Because the Pro-PM tools only need to be sharpened 1/3-1/4 as often as the PSI tools. Small ...


6

Template-guided turning requires a jig which holds a tracing tip to follow the template, and a cutting tip that tracks this motion to bring the workpiece into conformance with that shape. It's sorta like pattern-guided routing, except that the wood spins rather than the cutter, and the pattern is farther from the wood to give it room to spin. The other way ...


6

If dollars is your biggest concern, (and with the cost of some blanks, it should be!) I would recommend firewood. If you have access to a bandsaw then this is doubly easy. The majority of the wood I turn is stuff I've set aside while cutting fire wood. Either as I cut it into chunks or later when I split it in half to dry. If you are an urban dweller, ...


6

I would use filled epoxy for this, it's probably the best thing going as it's very tough, bonds very firmly to the wood and can be extremely cheap. Possibly best of all you make as much as you need when you need it without any worries of buying more of a product than a single project needs and having the rest go off sitting on the shelf Once fully set ...


6

A quick search for lathe turning tool handles presents a number of links but no real results for templates. Making a template is rather straightforward. Create a profile of the handle shape you wish. You can view others' work to determine what looks pleasant and functional and use that as a starting point. Create a pencil sketch on paper to represent the ...


5

A roughing gouge is important. But if you don't have to slow speed grinder with the necessary attachments it can be a pain to sharpen it once it dulls. I am a beginner at turning as well. I bought a cheap set of turning tools on amazon and have buyers remorse. My wife doesn't want me to spend any more money on the shop this month so I started making my own ...


5

You tagged powertools but, much like you, I don't own the the types of tools that would do this. While you might have a hard time getting a uniform curve I would suggest you use a bow saw. You could just follow the natural curve of the log which would look just as well. Traditional or modern bow saws should both work. Using a wider blade with deep gullets ...


5

What you want to do is uncommon and more of a niche thing. I'm pretty sure most people in a similar situation just hollow out the log and not care much for the inner circle of wood. Going over your options, A bandsaw with a large enough throat would be the simplest course of action, you should be able to just cut out the center with one cut into the side....


5

am I missing something when I go from roughing all the way to final sanding/polish using only the slowest speed? Try increasing the speed and see for yourself. You could even just pay attention to the difference between working at the perimeter of a large piece compared to working at the center -- the linear speed will be 5x greater at the edge of a 10" ...


5

While for a some turning work you probably could get away using some chisels as I have seen it done but I highly recommend you invest in a semi-decent set of tools just to get yourself started out (pre-assembled set or your own custom set if you buy the tools individually). The main difference in the types of tools are the bevels and grinds on the tool as ...


5

am I making a mistake here by not waiting for the linseed oil to cure before sealing it in with carnauba wax? I don't think so, no. A seemingly logical worry here is that the carnauba will seal the surface and prevent the BLO underneath from curing, but that's not a valid concern because a wax finish doesn't seal a surface off at all. It's far too thin ...


4

To add to the previous points: Just as taking light cuts is wise, reducing lathe speed is wise until confidence is gained with a given tool. Catches are much less severe with lighter cuts and slower speeds. A very good acronym for lathe tool handling: ABC’S OF WOODTURNING A is for anchor-put the tool on the tool rest B is for bevel- rest the bevel of the ...


4

I am generally good at research but I have no hands on experience with turning. I am honored at even the attempt to try and help you with your plight. I contacted the tool's manufacturer Robert Sorby to try and see what they could offer. One of their agents provided me with a PDF that I don't think is hosted on their site. I have the best I could muster ...


4

I'll add that the waste block, or glue block, can have a rabbet/tenon turned in it to be gripped by a chuck. Once the bowl is turned, you can start turning down the glue block as you desire, and can go smaller than the chuck diameter depending on thickness of the block. The bowl bottom can be prepped flat and smooth with the wood blank turned with the bottom ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible