17

The main advantage of using straight bits seems to be that they are cheaper, and easier to re-sharpen. They are perfectly fine for a number of uses though, especially where finish isn't particularly important. Downcut and upcut bits generally give a better cut and are easier to use when working with a handheld/manual-feed router. This is because instead of ...


14

A flush trim bit has the bearing at the bottom of the bit. This is so that it can trim a layer of laminate (i.e. Formica) that has been attached to the top of a smaller substrate (i.e. MDF or particle board) flush to the substrate. A pattern or template bit has the bearing at the top of the bit (between the shank and the cutting blades.) This is so that ...


12

The gel is something similar to Stripcoat (http://www.evanscoatings.com/). Prior to the bit being placed in individual packages, they can be bumped together. The hot melt coating on them keeps the edges intact during handling. Some of the coatings also have a layer of oil to protect against rust. I have a few pounds of this stuff I keep in my shop for ...


12

For cuts with a router, slow also can mean burnt material. If I have a complex profile to cut, I either break it into multiple passes with multiple bits, or I sneak up on it, going slightly deeper each pass. Some folks also make a deep pass at close to the final depth, then make another shallow, fast pass at final depth to finish up the cut. e.g.


11

I'm thinking of using a bigger core box bit on my drill press to make the four corners. I'm trying to avoid my plunge router due to possible side movements while plunging. I've heard of people using a router bit in a drill press, but I've never heard a reputable source recommend doing it. Personally, I wouldn't try it myself. A drill press runs 10-100x ...


11

A router spins at around 20,000 RPM. Your drill, at top speed, is closer to 300 RPM. Very different animal.


10

Always make sure your bits are sharp and take small bites with the router. If the router bit travels too slowly, it can burn and/or burnish your workpiece. Heat from taking too large a bite or moving slowly can also destroy the temper on the router bit, causing it to dull faster and/or break. Carbide bits are more resistant to heat than high-speed steel ...


10

Use the router table if the piece is too small to have the router base firm against the work piece. Use the router freehand if the piece is too large to safely move across the router table. If using the router freehand, plan on using some sort of jig or fixture to direct the router. A guide bearing on the bit works as a sort of jig. In general, if ...


10

First, to answer your 3 questions: Yes, you can safely make a 50mm deep cut with a handheld router, but only if you take several passes, only cutting part of the depth at a time. If you try to make the entire cut in one pass, you'll very likely either damage the bit, stall your router, injure yourself, or some combination of these. There are certainly ...


10

I have never sharpened my router bits (they are all the nice ones with the carbide cutters). However, pitch will develop on them after some use. I just use a bit cleaning solution I got from Woodcraft (I am sure you can use cheaper alternatives with the same result) and a brass brush to clean the pitch off. Make sure you use a brass brush and not a steel ...


10

In short: No, no, no. You can technically do this, unluckily, but it is highly inadvisable. It is a pity that it just looks like one could do it (1/2'' is not far off compared to 12mm, and 1/4'' is even closer to 6mm) and that with some luck, it indeed seems to "work just fine". That is true for the other way around, too. You can hardly tell a difference ...


9

Sharpening bits after every use sounds like a really bad advice. Not only is the router bit getting smaller every time (no joke!), so eventually you will notice that this 6mm plywood that you're trying to stick into the 6mm groove made with your 6mm dado bit wont't fit for some weird reason. Also you may eventually notice that those identical pieces that ...


9

A 2" ball end router bit, and a plunge router with adequate power to run it, and which can run slowly enough to run it safely (large diameter bits must not spin too fast.) Or (these days) a CNC router with a considerably smaller bit (round-nose would still be best for the end result) programmed to go around in circles and cut the shape. For only a few, ...


8

Don't worry about it- for most bits other than straight bits, you won't get the protective gel off without tearing it up anyway. I keep those little packets of silica gel that seem to accompany many products today and throw one in any closed drawer or enclosed space. In my portable toolchest, I keep a piece of chalk or two, which also absorb moisture.


8

You should use spiral blade bits whenever you can, that is: You do not need a diameter that is too large (spiral router bits cannot have a diameter larger than the shaft, so you're limited to 12mm or so maximum). No ball bearing needed for guidance, usually spiral cutters don't have these (though, as pointed out by Rob, you can find them). You don't mind ...


8

Planing by hand would be the standard response for any hand-tool aficionado, as this is how chamfers were done before power tools came along. This can be done freehand, by planing to marked or gauged lines on the face and edges, but it's easier to use some kind of chamfering jig if accuracy and repeatability are desired. Because I'm presuming you'll want to ...


8

How can I easily install the bits in the router at the correct height? The first time you use the set: Install one cutter to a height that looks right for your lumber. Make a on a test piece. Label this piece so that you'll remember that it's not scrap. Make sure that you mark the side of the piece that was against the router's base plate. Switch to the ...


8

I don't think I've ever seen that. Is the bit sharp? Have you checked it for burrs or other defects? The top picture seems to have some artifacts going across the face also, but they didn't result in tear outs. The burn on the right side indicates that maybe you paused or slowed down at that point, which may contribute or may be a separate problem. Was ...


8

1/2 inch or 1/4 inch? I'd generally avoid really long bits in a 1/4" chuck for fear of deflection and maybe even breakage. However, 1/2", with really small amounts of stock removed are perfectly fine. I'll often use pairs of 2" cutters (one with a bearing; one plain) to put a flat surface on 3-1/2" stock. (Corbels and stuff like that.)


8

I don't know the name of that bit profile but it's possible the cut is done using just a portion of a bit, e.g the highlighted portion here: Source: Rockler tambour bit set. Edit: thanks to the Comment below from Aloysius Defenestrate, the correct bit to use for this is called, obviously enough, a drawer-pull bit. As theorised a portion of the bit is used ...


7

In short: No. Compared to 16,000 RPM, 20,000 RPM is 25% over the specified maximum. Manufacturers -- even cheapish ones -- always calculate in a bit of tolerance, but 25% over limit is a lot. I wouldn't mind running a 19,000 RPM bit (if that existed) at 20,000 if it was the only one I had available, but surely not a 16,000 one. What may happen? 1/16'' (1....


6

Larger bits will generally recommend that they be used in a router table or with a speed control or both. That bit is spinning very fast. Even with a small-radius bit it's moving past the wood at a pretty good clip. Increase the radius, and the linear speed at which the bit hits the wood also increases by the same ratio. If a large bit takes too deep a cut ...


6

I would guess it is more profile and how much wood you both expect to remove and how much surface area you have in contact with the wood. The shank size is only the first indication. I haven't seen any 1/4" bits that 'Need' to be mounted in a router table. However that doesn't mean that you can't benefit from doing so. The larger shank bits allow for a ...


6

Note: Bits generally have speed concerns because they have a large radus, which means the outer edge is moving at a much higher linear speed and that you have more mass trying to fly outward. Panel-raising bits are the most common example of this. A better alternative may be to switch from wide to tall, reducing the radius and mass back to something more ...


6

I can't imagine a bit capable of milling metal having any difficulty whatsoever dealing with fir or walnut. However I don't know you can assume that a metal-cutting bit will leave a particularly good surface on wood because of the different edge geometry (similar to twist drills, where metal-specific ones are subtly different to general-purpose or wood-...


6

You NEED a different collet. Your router could be spinning the bit at 20,000 rpm. Ignoring the possibility of damaging your work piece, the personal risk is extremely high. edit: On @AstPace's good suggestion, I've added a couple of relevant points from the comments trail. As this router also has a 3/8" collet, you could use an adapter to get down to a ...


6

There is no reason I know of. In fact I have one in my shop. Check out here for one source. Their image does not show the guide bearing. My bit has a screw hole to accept standard bearings and you can call them to confirm the hole is still there. I'm also sure they sell the bearings in a variety of diameters. Good Luck.


6

If you are in a pinch and your router has a plunge base, you certainly could cut all the way through the plywood with a spiral or straight bit, using a straightedge and cutting in 1/8" deep passes. Make sure you have sacrificial material on the underside so you don't cut into your workbench or floor on the last pass. That said, the work will go a lot faster ...


6

The key search term for this residue is "pitch", like "removing pitch from blade". A variety of products for cleaning pitch off of cutting tools are sold, many of which use a caustic chemical like that found in spray-on oven cleaner. You may have luck with oven cleaner itself, although those chemicals can remove other things in addition to pitch, like paint ...


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