27

One thing to keep in mind is that in many cases, a really low-end tool will just be frustrating. If you only need to save up for a couple months to buy better tools and your window of opportunity for woodworking will still be open at that time go ahead and wait. You may even find some great deals in the meantime. But if you have a choice between saving up ...


20

TL;DR warning. Sharpening is a deep and broad subject, with a lot of opinion and personal preference interspersed with the facts and science so be prepared to have to make your own mind up, i.e. choose your reality and stick with it! I don't think I missed an explanation as to why he chose to put that bevel beyond personal preference. Paul Sellers does ...


19

when I am levelling out wood with my plane, I get little pits (likely I suspect from the blade chipping against denser areas. This is called tearout, it is not caused by denser areas of the wood (in fact it can be common in softer sections of a piece of wood). It occurs when bundles of wood fibres literally tear free from the surface of the board instead ...


16

a Swanson speed square has a lip on one side that makes it really good for quickly drawing a perpendicular line on a work piece A try square is similar in that respect: the handle is thicker than the blade, so it's easy to push the inside of the handle up against the edge of a board and mark (or verify) a line perpendicular (square) to the edge. And you can ...


14

Well, to start, today's squares really are pretty cheap and it wouldn't cost much more than the materials if you are going to make it out of metal. However, making one out of wood, if you have a rectangle with the opposite sides the same length, then measuring the distance between opposite corners is the way to go. When both measurements are equal, all ...


13

Using the aforementioned work table, I had placed other wood below the work piece, to prop it up, but could not get a tight fit so everything just moved around. I think a simple mod here could get this method to work (I've used something similar myself when planing thinner stock many times) although it wouldn't be the primary way I'd suggest you go about ...


13

You have there what's called a saw jointer. The one below is very similar. The site linked as the source says it's similar to a Stearn's model, so that might be what you have. (source) These are used to joint (flatten) the teeth of a hand saw to one level. After jointing, one would then sharpen each individual tooth such that the points are now at the ...


12

They are designed to smooth round things like wheel spokes and chair legs. According to this nice blurb from Wikipedia: A spokeshave is a tool used to shape and smooth wooden rods and shafts - often for use as wheel spokes, chair legs (particularly complex shapes such as the cabriole leg),[1] self bows, and arrows. It can also be used to carve canoe or ...


12

When discussing tools, there is a spectrum ranging from construction tools (good enough for framing a house but not necessarily precision instruments) to machinist tools (which are typically highly precise). Woodworking tools fall somewhere in between. A try square like the one pictured in your question is great for scribing or drawing 90 degree lines, but ...


12

what are live and dead centres? To put it simply a dead center is just that - dead. It has no moving parts. It is really nothing more than a metal shaft with a point. (source: parts-recycling.com) A live center is similar, but the shaft has a bearing that allows it to turn. For example, in my lathe, the tail stock has a Morse taper, in which I put a live ...


12

I'm not that familiar with new-build tools but that looked naggingly familiar and I was relatively sure it was for a saw and not any sort of plane. This made it easy to track down: [Veritas dovetail saw] Edit: it looks like the handle is common to their tenon saw as well even though it features a slightly different means of attachment: [Veritas tenon saw]


12

Hollow auger U.S. Patent 203,384 is for a "Hollow auger" or more specifically for improvements to a hollow auger. "What's a hollow auger?" you ask. Well, as @Keshlam suggested it is a device for cutting tenons on chair rungs or spokes as demonstrated by a similar device on a You Tube video. It's a device that, rather than drilling a hole, it drills what ...


12

The type of mitres you're looking to do are called case mitres because in a different context they'd be used for casework, i.e. cabinetry or box making1. Other than sawing them directly (challenging to do with hand tools) the standard method to produce these is by planing. Even if your freehand sawing was very very good and you could do the cuts freehand (...


11

A large part depends on what you ultimately plan on turning. However, this is the set I bought when I jumped into the hobby. 3 of them I almost never use even now. 3/16-Inch Parting Tool - used to 'cut' the work-piece off it's base. Once I got a chuck I use this surprisingly little but still a must have. 5/8-Inch Spear Scraper - like the round nose ...


11

Many router bits manufacturers include bits to cut the slots for biscuits. If you don't have to many to make, this may be an alternative for you. Here's an example: (picture via google search from eBay)


11

Hand saws may never get used in a shop that turns out cabinets exclusively, but in most shops they have a wide variety of uses. Yes, there are specific rip and crosscut saws, but the woodworkers I know have mostly adopted Japanese style hand saws. A ryoba saw is a great tool to have around. It has crosscut teeth on one side and ripping teeth on the other. ...


11

I suspect the issue here is with the bowsaw blade not having enough 'set' to the teeth. The 'set' of the teeth on a saw blade is how far to either side the teeth are bent out from the main body of the blade, which makes the width of the cut wider and gives the body of the blade some clearance in the saw groove (kerf). Some bowsaw blades have no set (...


11

One website states that hickory and ash are really the only (US domestic) woods worth using. Obviously just one man's opinion and a gross over-simplification. It's also inherently misleading because it's light on detail. In reality while hickory is broadly speaking worthy of its reputation as a premier handle wood it obscures certain facts. The first is if ...


11

I am trying to figure out why that was the standard at the time. Not sure if this is a chicken/egg issue, but I think the answer has to do with a tool called a brace. The first braces were no more than curved pieces of wood with a tapered metal inlet at one end that received different bits. The bit was held in via the wedging action of the tapered end. (...


11

This is the type of question that unfortunately tends to yield primarily opinion-based answers, but I think it's one of a number of exceptions to this being a bad fit for SE. My answer is a definitive yes. Not only do I think hand drills have a place in the modern woodworking shop — regardless of the dominance of power tools otherwise — there are many cases ...


11

In short, copper and aluminum are soft metals, and you'd need to consider the quality of the casting and the metallurgical treatment of the tool as well. It sounds like a fun project, but watch out for potential catastrophic failure of the tool. The first metal tools used by man were copper and copper alloys (bronze and brass). The main problem with these ...


11

When I don't want to make messy marks, it's blue painter's tape all the way. (There are various options, in terms of how long you can leave it on. Just remember to peel it in time.)


10

well, there may be more to it that you'd think. And definitely an interesting piece of trivia. There are 2 types of nibs, either as something sticking out like on the picture in the question, or as a little notch. There are multiple answers, ranging from: nothing, that's just for decoration this can be used to attach a blade guard (so you tie the strings ...


10

So how can you make a square, without using a square? How were they originally made if the accuracy needed to be right, but modern methods of measurement and manufacture were not available. Rope, and Pythagoras triangle. A long time ago, the Great Pyramid of Giza was built. This was way before any modern, recognised system of working out a square - and yet ...


10

A draw knife is one traditional tool used to remove bark. If you have a folding pocket knife, you might be able to hack it into a mini-draw-knife- wedge the tip into a small stick, use tape or twine to close up the split, then use the body of the knife as one handle, and the stick as the other.


10

I think everyone is overthinking the issue at hand here. I figure they would be very shallow. Just enough to stop the feet from moving but enough to have a gap between the glass and the table. 1/8th to 1/4 inches deep at the most and less than an inch in diameter. Really, all the OP is asking is how to make a circular recess 1/8" to 1/4" in depth, and ...


10

Yes in this case it could be fixed easily. I disassembled the clamp and found one piece a steel with an obvious mechanical failure: This piece of steel is the one that prevents the clamp from opening, so it makes sense that over time it will bend in this direction. I bent it back to its original shape, and put everything back together; Nothing else was ...


10

Although the manufacturer call this a Stepped Rabbet Plane this is a bullnose plane. Although their forms vary all planes with the iron bedded at a typical angle* and mounted in such a way that it's the leading part of the plane are in effect bullnose planes, intended for planing directly into a corner or the end of a stopped housing/dado. *Generally 45° ...


9

Tl;DR Let me begin this answer with the final conclusion: all sharpening systems work. Just pick one and live with it because none of them are any fun. I use a set of Arkansas oil stones from Dan’s Whetstones and use the Veritas honing guide. I’m slowly trying to learn to do this freehand and wean myself from the honing guide. In addition to the stones,...


9

Chisel to create the mortise -- you can save a huge amount of work by drilling out most of the waste. Saw the tenon to slightly over the final size (saw outside the markup lines), then fine tune with plane and chisel (shoulder plane will avoid the need to chisel). There is always a traditional hand-tool solution. It may or may not be more work, and often ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible