Hot answers tagged

19

A planer sled is a flat, rigid box or piece of material that supports your workpiece and holds it in a specific orientation as it passes through a thickness planer. By holding a twisted or otherwise warped piece of lumber in a fixed orientation as it passes through the planer, the sled allows the planer to chop off the high spots, effectively jointing the ...


17

What I have tried in the past is simply nailing a straight board to the board I want to cut In essence that's a very good method to do it, and will even work even if the board you're working has very uneven edges, e.g. a live edge (UK: waney edge). I would recommend you not use nails ideally, you can hold the board securely without having to mark it. Below ...


14

The purpose of a jointer is specifically to flatten warped lumber. If your lumber isn't warped, you don't have to joint it. In a fantasy world, none of us would need jointers. Unfortunately, in our world wood moves, so even if the lumber was jointed perfectly flat before you bought it, it probably won't be perfectly flat by the time you go to use it. Certain ...


12

To add to Rob's answer: A planer mills the wood to a fixed height above the bed. If the piece is warped or twisted, the warp will still be there upon exiting the planer, and at best you'll have a warped piece with constant thickness. (Not even that, if the piece rocks differently each time through the planer.) With the sled or rails holding the wood in a ...


11

To make the first 'cut' I would split it in half. I personally would use my wood maul and just split it. I've had years of splitting wood for firewood and could do a pretty even split down the middle. So, what I would recommend would be to use a large mallet or a round ended maul and pound it into the wood to split it. To make things a little easier you ...


11

Building a bandsaw sled and using a bandsaw with 10" or larger resaw capacity is the first power tool solution that comes to mind. Matthias Wandel has a nice article detailing how to do this. Since you mentioned you only have access to a circular saw and table saw, the cheapest solution, aside from finding someone with more tools, would be to rip the block ...


8

I'm of the same mind as Matt- you'd need a large capacity band saw, a chain saw then a big band saw, a chainsaw mill, a portable mill, or.. any number of large, expensive tools. Were it me, I'd ask the folks at my local wood working stores (Rockler, Woodcraft, etc) If there's a mill they know that will take a random chunk of wood. If they don't know, ask ...


8

If you want to use hand tools only you don't have a lot of choices. In the olden days you would most likely hew each log into a single timber (i.e. in building a mighty timber-framed barn, or a ship) rather than sawing it into planks. See Roy Underhill's TED talk for a brief demo of the technique. If you really want to saw it into planks with hand tools ...


7

Checking in on my wood (just to admire it I suppose) I noticed after the first day that a crack was appearing through the center of the log. A through-the-centre crack, also a from-the-centre crack, is referred to as a heart shake. I thought it was odd but wasn't really surprised as that is supposed to happen over time. Actually it can be almost ...


7

What you're talking about is timber-frame construction, and you're on the right track. I read somewhere it is best to use fairly fresh cut trees for this, to make the hewing easier. Yup. Green wood is much easier to cut, especially with hand tools. But how long do I need to dry them afterwards before using? If I just seal and use them directly will I risk ...


6

See past comments re using a sled to stabilize the piece so a planer can be used as a wide jointer. e.g.This one If you don't want to build a sled, another approach is gluing reasonably straight "rails" to each edge of the board (not the ends) to hold it in a consistent position. The tops of the rails will be planed away as you flatten the board, but if ...


6

Short answer, yes you can get your wood more straight than you will find at the box stores, and even from your hardwood dealer. It would stand to reason, as you say that they should be able to produce a straighter product, but the reality is they are dealing in volume, and so there are many factors. First, they are going to be using the cheapest quality ...


6

You should do this with the table saw. This is a very typical operation in the normal milling process. Normally you would set the table saw's rip fence to the final width you need, but in this case, since you want to match an existing dimension you should ignore the numbers and use the physical dimension you want to set the fence. Put the board just ahead ...


5

Bring in some other tools This would seem blasphemy to do to wood of this age but you could consider cutting the boards down their length and laminating them once you make them square. If you are already cutting them square then the natural character that this wood would have would be removed anyway. Table saw and band saw come to mind. They should be ...


5

Generally I wouldn't recommend using a larger bar than is recommended. I think the biggest issue is you will burn out your saw. However, there is one thing to think on that might make it more 'ok'. When milling with a chainsaw there are special chains (ripping chains) and bars you can use to reduce the strain on the saw. Like other blade, most chain ...


5

That process would certainly work, although if you want better results, you might consider a slightly different method that requires no bandsaw work at all: Face-joint one face. Edge-joint one edge. Now glue some tiny wooden shims (no more than three, with none on the thickest corner) onto the remaining rough face to bring it to the desired thickness. Plane ...


5

Leaf springs from the pick&pull junkyard. Already has an eyelet, reasonably straight, beefy, sharpen-able, ... what's not to like? Heck, just come by my yard and see what you want. (Though from the looks of it, you're 2,928 miles away. Maybe start driving soon.)


5

There are a couple options. The first and cheapest (though by far the most work) is to get a chainsaw mill. some of these are a guide you can buy for your existing chain saw and others come with a special bar and chain and others come with the saw. You will need a fairly powerful saw and I would recommend spending the money on a rip saw chain. A rip ...


5

It would appear that you are agreeable to learning new software. One product pops into my alleged mind when you ask for a "do it all" type of program. Fusion 360 is free for students, hobbyists and for business that produce below a certain level of income (or is it profit) using the software. For the DIY fellows and gals and hobbyists, it is required to ...


4

TL;DR: It is an enormous amount of effort but it can be done. The resulting wood can be prone to cracking. I've tried to do a bit of this and like most of us here on Stack Exchange, I read a lot of information about it online and offline (dead tree versions: IRONY). Here is a summary of my experience: Lesson 1: Buy coating to paint the end grain from ...


4

I've heard a up to a week or so to let it acclimate for best results, but some of that could be related to the wood species and cut, and how much movement you can handle in your assembly. As far as after the rough cut, if there are tensions in it, it should show up from almost immediately to a day or so. Much more than that for either and really you are ...


4

The other answers correctly state that leaf springs make excellent froes, especially if you can find ones with the eyes already attached. However, any kind of steel will work for a froe. The edge isn't used for cutting wood and is only active at the very beginning of the splitting, otherwise it's the wedge that gets the job done. Thus, the steel has no need ...


4

Leaf springs are by far the most popular retrieval from junkyards because they are made from carbon steel and have convenient, simple, useful shape. Leaf springs are made from a wide variety of different steels so there will be no way to know what you are dealing with. Axles are also good steel, although finding rod axles is harder and harder these days. ...


4

If you've got a lot to spare, then overdo it. Curves, twists, warps etc will always kill your yield. Flatsawn is apt to be less stable (esp with respect to cupping) than quartersawn. The milling marks you'll get from the sawmill will have an impact, too. Really rough, and you'll want a bit more thickness in the rough size. Regarding the final use... short ...


4

I am assuming by CNC machine, you mean a router. The blue line section that is horizontal will be a regular 90 degree cut. The sections of the blue line that are on the curves will have an increasing large fillet as it approaches the bottom of the cut, unless you have a 4th axis on your CNC to rotate the item. The cuts on the curves will also not be ...


3

The ends of a log dry out much faster than the center. What to do about it partly depends on the size (length) of the log and your intentions. The picture makes the log look pretty short, 2-3 ft? For short logs I tend to split them in half. It seems to increase the surface area for releasing moisture from the center where it generally releases slowest. ...


3

My question is: After I do this but before I plane the boards, should I leave them sit out in the open air (maybe a week or two) to reabsorb moisture from the air? I think it's certainly advisable, and other than the wait there's no downside to doing this so you lose nothing but a bit of time if you take this extra step. And kudos for realising already it ...


3

Waffle is how I've commonly heard this pattern referred to.


2

In my experience, if you want a glue-able joint, a table saw cannot do it. There is too much 'wiggle' when pushing the wood through. A high end cabinet saw with a large carriage and a very good blade might manage it, but my table saw and certainly any portable shop saw just do not have the ability. So, not being able to (yet) by a joiner you will need to ...


2

If you planks wiggle on your table saw, use your handheld instead. It is the same idea as you have already presented, but upside down.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible