Hot answers tagged

16

It is called clinching. The technique is pretty simple, yet hold fairly well to prevent separation from the two boards. Here is a good example of how to do it: Source The example calls for a small bar to be used to bend a short length of the nail. This can also be accomplished by just using a hammer to angle the nail. Any deformation of the wood will be ...


14

If there is one thing I'm proficient at its pallet teardown. You have lots of options. It does all depend on the style of pallet you are working with and it some cases its wood composition (hard, soft, pine, oak.....). For argument sake lets say you are not using the close boarded types. Just a hammer Some pallets rely on gravity to hold them together. ...


11

It's called a plug cutter. (source: rockler.com) image shamelessly stolen borrowed from Rockler Cut your plugs from a scrap piece of whatever you're making your project out of. Also, a screwdriver makes an excellent pry-bar for breaking the plug out of the board. I don't recall whether with- or cross-grain is the way to go, but it should take less than 30 ...


7

Clawfoot hammer works just fine. Failing that a pair of pincers, pinch the nail as close to the wood as possible and then move front and back around the contact surface of the claws. The big problem is getting a grip on the nail heads especially when they are in deep. You can pry the boards apart by inserting a lever between them and wiggling. This way you ...


5

Rockler has a V-Nail Installation Tool that should be right up your alley: I'm sure there are other stores where you can get these, but this is the first one I found.


5

Here is a good video showing how to get nails out that have pulled through the slats and are stuck in the inner runners (which is a common problem). He suggests gripping the hammer in a vise and using the superior leverage of the long piece of wood itself to pull the nails. He also suggests hitting the nail head once with the hammer before pulling to break ...


5

Quality Related to Jamming The best answer to this question would be to run an experiment and report the jam rates for different grades of nail guns, with different grades of nails. However, since most users most likely won't have a number of differing quality nail guns at their disposal, I can tell you the experience I've had with my mid-range quality ...


5

I don't know that I would trust 16 ga nails from a pneumatic nailer, regardless of length, unless there were quite a few of them. The issue is the difference between the body diameter and the head diameter (or lack thereof). If you're going to be hanging tools and/or shop cabinets full of heavy tools from the plywood, I'd recommend finding another fastener ...


5

One realm where staples shine is when attaching a material that lacks the suitable structure to reliably hold under expected strains within the locus of a single, small headed brad. A staple distributes stresses across a wider area thereby including more material in the join. Thin, weaker materials such as paper, cardboard, and plastic sheeting are examples ...


4

Staples generally are for attaching thin material to a surface. So for wood (sort of) stapling can be used to tack on hardboard where appearance isn't important. The primary woodworking-related function may be for upholstery work, for both the webbing and fabrics or leather coverings. But bottom line is that staples could be used for anything they're capable ...


4

Clinching or clenching. I've always used the former word. http://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/joinery/video-tip-clenching-a-nail-with-confidence


4

No option, you're going to have to dig into the wood a bit. You need to be able to get a grip on the nail heads to begin to pull them out and if they're sunk below the surface you can only do this by removing some wood. With a bit of luck though you may only need to drill two small holes on either side of each nail, just enough to allow the tips of pliers ...


4

Concoction was left in the pail for about 3 weeks. Life got in the way. Most the tutorials about this sort of thing suggest a week at most. Not a problem. The goal is ideally to convert all of the acetic acid to iron acetate, so giving it longer is advisable, not a bad thing in any way. As I've alluded to previously, most guides to this sort of thing are ...


4

I agree with TX Turner -- screws would probably be the way to go. I like to opt for the SPAX screws that self-tap (no pre-drilling and unlikely to split wood) and have the torx bit so it is far less likely for the bit to skip and strip the screw. They might cost more but they are totally worth it. Home Depot carries the the SPAX brand, and Lowes carries a ...


3

Dados would be best, since the mechanical part of the joint will carry most of the load. If you go with butt joints and fasteners, I'd suggest pocket screws instead of either nails or screws into end grain. Pocket screws go into the face of the board instead of the end, so they should hold better. In most cases pocket screws are easier to hide, so you get a ...


3

To answer your question, without actual joinery like dovetails or dadoes, I'd recommend glue-and-screw. That is, some mechanical fastener that actually gives those butt-joints some strength. Because, while PVA glue is incredibly good, it is not at its best with all of the joint being 50% end-grain. Many joints like dove-tails, fingers, dadoes, or rabbets ...


3

The answer to this question could be simple or complex depending on exactly what sort of joinery or cabinet making you're talking about - you're asking it in a fairly generic context. That said, it sounds like you're talking about joining individual boards with butt joints to make a larger panel. You've mentioned dowels - they are sometimes used when joining ...


2

Besides using a plug cutter as suggested by FreeMan, you can cut plugs from a dowel. If you cannot find a commercially-manufactured dowel of the correct size or wood species, you can make your own.


1

The resin pockets may not be an issue. The resins from some trees such as pine are commonly eaten (or made into hot drinks) in certain parts of the world, that's how non-toxic it can be. But without specific info on the exact species you're using I don't think you should make any assumptions. "Canadian oregon" is better known to much of the rest of the ...


1

Just accurate work and some training. There are also good jigs which can be used with a router and they have a fine tuning to make the fit more loose or tight...


1

After asking a similar question and doing some research I have found a novel alternative. Use a sawz-all, or reciprocating saw, to just cut all the nails free, then remove the tops with a punch and hammer. Searching for "DiResta: Pallet Toolbox" will result in the following youtube video demonstrating this technique. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible