44

Ashler's answer is the simplest and cheapest way to get holes the same depth. But as an extra there are bit collars that can be put on the bits which will enforce exact depth stops.


39

A lot of people drill a hole through a suitable length of wood dowel (or small square cross section) and use that as a stop-collar on the drill. Example You can also just use an external chunk of wood Example One benefit of both these is you don't need an Allen key and can very quickly swap back and forth between two or more different depths (useful for ...


29

Anything tool that rotates is generally something to avoid using gloves with. Tools to definitely avoid glove use for incude: Lathes Circular saws (including table saws, miter saws, and radial arm saws) Bandsaws Routers Planers Drill presses The list goes on... Gloves can give you a false sense of security. They will do little to protect you from a cut, ...


28

One thing to keep in mind is that in many cases, a really low-end tool will just be frustrating. If you only need to save up for a couple months to buy better tools and your window of opportunity for woodworking will still be open at that time go ahead and wait. You may even find some great deals in the meantime. But if you have a choice between saving up ...


27

The simplest means is to place a tab of masking tape on the drill bit at the desired depth. When the spinning tab lowers to the surface of the wood and sweeps away the wood chips, stop.


25

Keyed chucks still get a better grip on any bit. I'm willing to use keyless on my portable drill -- though mine will take a key too, and there are times when I use it. I wouldn't trust keyless on a drill press.


23

A planer is used for making two edges parallel while a jointer is used for making straight or flat surfaces. Let's say you have a warped board (suppose it looks like a banana from end to end). If you pass it through a planer, it will enter as a banana and exit as a banana. A jointer, on the other hand, will shave off bits of the banana, little by little, ...


23

It has to do with the rotation of the bit. In a normal cut, the work piece is fed against the rotation. A normal cut works like this (shown for freehand): The cutting action will pull the work piece into the bit. The other cut, is known as a climbing cut. It pushes the work piece away from the bit. A climbing cut will have less tear out, but requires ...


23

You can also adjust your drill press table to be at the desired depth when the drill reaches the end of it's stroke.


19

A planer will ensure that 2 opposite faces of a piece of wood are parallel to each other will generally handle wider pieces of wood is not the appropriate tool for working the narrow edge of a 'wide' x 'thin' board (think shelving), as you cannot safely feed a tall, skinny piece of wood through it allow you to make an uneven board an even thickness from one ...


19

The best thing that I've found is to have a sharp blade with 3 teeth per inch. This is Michael Fortune's recommendation (a Fine Woodworking Contributor). I used to crank up the tension in my bandsaw blade to the point of it almost snapping. I finally listened to shoptalk live (FWW's podcast) and they said a 3 TPI blade will solve 90% of drift problems. It ...


18

Batteries in general have several points worth concerning their usage. Yes, you are asking about storage but it is worth knowing that their storage strategy is influence by their usage frequency as well. Which type you have is important. There is not one overall method. Li-Ion (Lithium Ion) Like most batteries they should be stored at room temperate and not ...


18

Tape is what I would have suggested and continue to use but if you wanted something a little more robust my suggestion would be depth stop collars /nuts Image from AliExpress Easily removed off the bits and adjustable as well which tape would not be as much.


17

Losing a key is definitely inconvenient but you don't need to pack up for the day just yet. This will also work for a drill press What you need Large flat head screwdriver Drill bit that fits ( not the drilling end ) where the chuck key would have been placed. There are other items that will work just as well but the butt of a drill bit fits nicely in ...


16

A sharp 3 or 4 TPI blade is the best first thing to try. A slower feed rate can also help, but if your blade rubs against the wood fast enough and long enough to produce significant friction, too slow a feed rate can cause burning. If you've bought a bunch of high TPI blades after discovering that a higher tooth count often produces a cleaner cut, you may ...


16

As @keshlam pointed out. My drill presses both have keyed chucks and it allows much greater torque to put a stronger clamp on the bit. This is really important for larger bits when you get over 1 1/2" say for keyhole saws or large Forstner bits. There can be a lot of resistance and I don't think most keyless chucks can do the job. Even there I've had a ...


15

What sander should I use for something like this? You need tools that can sand contoured objects. There are a number of options, and given the varied nature of your work you'll probably use more than one tool. Here are some choices: flap wheel: Basically a wheel with pieces of heavy duty sandpaper or abrasive cloth inserted around the circumference ...


13

Generally, that is the right thing to do. Obviously you wouldn't let a power tool run all day when you don't need it, or even walk away and let it run unattended. But keeping it running in between making several cuts in a couple of work pieces or drilling several holes is absolutely fine (I am almost inclined to say "best practice"). For the tool as well ...


12

Although there are many instances in which you need to remove a standard or modular table saw blade guard, most cuts can be made with a riving knife installed. However, there are a few operations for which you must (or should) remove the riving knife: Raising the blade through a workpiece (e.g., when cutting the slot for a crosscut sled or zero-clearance ...


11

There is one case where it is safe and beneficial to use gloves with power tools: when the tool is weak enough to stop without causing damage to your body parts. For example, I use cut resistant gloves when carving with Dremel. The bit is sharp enough to cut through skin (even quite badly), but the motor is weak enough that it will stall if it hits the ...


11

I like a belt sander when I need to really remove some material like paint for example, I think it cuts better. an Orbital I like for finer sanding it offers a lot more control.


11

As discussed in some of the answers to What is the difference between a sabre saw and a jig saw, the terminology has been used differently over time. What we call a scroll saw today (a stationary/benchtop tool with the blade fixed at both ends) was commonly called a jigsaw many years ago. (Source: craigslist) Today's handheld jigsaw (with the blade fixed ...


11

Yes, it's possible to wear out an impact driver, but what you're describing sounds normal. The driver will act as a normal drill until it exceeds its "normal driving" capacity, then the internal hammers will engage and you'll hear a whacking/clicking/grinding sound. The sound is similar to that of the clutch when you're using the clutch. Some impact ...


11

The primary reason for speed adjustment on bandsaws is to accommodate different materials (mainly metal). That said, dropping the speed down for some operations can stretch the capabilities of an underpowered machine further. For example, if you're resawing particularly thick or dense wood with a 1.5 hp machine (or high-TPI blade), reducing the blade speed ...


11

I think everyone is overthinking the issue at hand here. I figure they would be very shallow. Just enough to stop the feet from moving but enough to have a gap between the glass and the table. 1/8th to 1/4 inches deep at the most and less than an inch in diameter. Really, all the OP is asking is how to make a circular recess 1/8" to 1/4" in depth, and ...


11

A router spins at around 20,000 RPM. Your drill, at top speed, is closer to 300 RPM. Very different animal.


11

In short: No, no, no. You can technically do this, unluckily, but it is highly inadvisable. It is a pity that it just looks like one could do it (1/2'' is not far off compared to 12mm, and 1/4'' is even closer to 6mm) and that with some luck, it indeed seems to "work just fine". That is true for the other way around, too. You can hardly tell a difference ...


11

I couldn't figure anything out from inspecting the saw on the outside, so I opened up the saw. It turns out that the saw did not go all the way down because there was a lot of saw dust on the inside:


11

The advice for a shop is pretty much the same as for any loud activity. There is a lot of research you can do on the internet for music studios, for example, that will apply. So, this is not specific to woodworking1. The first question is what is your budget and how much work do you want to do? Ideally you would physically separate the walls from the floor, ...


11

I was looking for a thin 2mm drill bit. When I asked a manufacturer why their thinnest drill bit was 3mm, they said because drill bits are fragile if you make them too thin. To me 2mm isn't actually very thin. I commonly drill holes smaller than this and both of the HSS bit sets that I own (bought many years apart) go down to 1.5mm. And twist drills much ...


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