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19

Obviously both of those cases are quite severe examples of edge damage, but even for single chips smaller than this re-grinding the bevel manually can be challenging. This level of edge repair is generally considered a job for power grinding. It is possible manually, I've done it entirely by hand on 'rescue chisels' using a combination of diamond plates ...


16

Batteries in general have several points worth concerning their usage. Yes, you are asking about storage but it is worth knowing that their storage strategy is influence by their usage frequency as well. Which type you have is important. There is not one overall method. Li-Ion (Lithium Ion) Like most batteries they should be stored at room temperate and ...


15

Your saw may be poorly adjusted. A properly tuned band-saw has the wheel axles exactly parallel and the wheels in the same plane. The axles can be adjusted using the tilt screw on the upper wheel. If that doesn't help than it may be the crown of the wheels is too flat. Put a ruler on the wheel and see if there is enough of a crown left. If not then you ...


13

Is it a good idea to cover the machine? Covering it will prevent it from being coated in dust and grime but since it's inside (I assume), it offers little protection from anything else. Can covering it cause problems (i.e. trap moisture) If it were sealed and covered in a plastic tarp, perhaps moisture could build up, but if you cover it with a fabric ...


12

I've never worked with it before, and was wondering if it would be a wood that could be worked by hand? Yes, absolutely. Black walnut isn't really all that hard of a wood, comparatively. Looking at Janka hardness testing, black walnut is about 1010 pound-force. By comparison, basswood is about 410 and purpleheart is 1860. I would consider purpleheart ...


12

I think this falls under the "it's true, but doesn't matter" category. Motors will operate at their peak efficiency when clean, but it takes a lot of dust build up before the performance or longevity would be impacted. Personally, I clean off my tools prior to storing them, just because I like to keep things neat. My Dad used the same miter saw on ...


11

If the table saw has been properly stored, you may not have to do much before you can start using it. Find out if there's a reason why it hasn't been used other than a loss of interest or lack of time--for example, maybe it needed the bearings replaced and your friend just never got around to it. Has it been subjected to the elements? If it has been ...


11

"Paste wax" is the go-to wax for your purpose and for waxing tool surfaces. Avoid buying a wax that contains silicone, because the silicone can directly or indirectly get transferred onto your wood and cause problems when you go to apply finish. I've also been told to avoid car wax since it can contain silicone and apparently it can also contain abrasives (...


10

Light cleaning can be done with #0000 steel wool. Naval Jelly can be used if more aggressive cleaning is needed. SC Johnson paste wax can be used to maintain it.


9

This article has a nice tutorial about how to set the jointer knives. It covers 2 styles of heads. First is the style with jackscrews (labeled A in the image): With those you can adjust each screw until the blade is set correctly (as with the straightedge method). The second style is the one with pushback springs. With those there should also be a jig ...


9

Cleaning starts before you use them. Get the brush fully wet with whatever solvent your finish requires (water, mineral spirits, etc). This will help prevent finish from drawing up into the tang of the brush. Clean the brush immediately after use. For water based finishes, wash with warm water and soap (I use dish soap such as Dawn). Work the soap into ...


8

Ideally you want a plane with the following: Critical: no cracks or heavy wear around the mouth it should not be missing any parts--e.g., blade, chipbreaker, cap iron, adjustors, body (of course) none of the screws or corresponding holes should be stripped or cross-threaded Highly preferable: Flat sole little or no rust no cracks, pitting, or chipping in ...


8

Unfortunately it does take quite a bit of solvent to properly clean all spray equipment. If you think of the quantity of water that would typically be run through after spraying latex it makes sense that a similar quantity would be needed of whatever other solvent is required for another paint type. This 'wasted' solvent is one of the under-advertised ...


8

I am trying to figure out if there are any differences between the two that would make me want to choose one over the other. Or perhaps it just boils down to price and opinion in which case the answer would be something along it doesn't matter. Yes, it mostly boils down to price. The continuous-surface diamond plates tend to be significantly more ...


8

To add to the other answers, the metal parts probably don't need special care other than rust-prevention. However, if there are any rubber parts (belts, seals, o-rings, etc.) these might degrade without use. This is especially true for rubber parts that are attached to the motor, such as belts and seals. If the motor runs belts I would take them off and ...


8

I think this is too broad to fully answer if asking about all saw types. Power saws I think can be grouped together for convenience and because the issues are fairly similar for all, but once you get to hand saws it's a whole different ballgame. Power saws For power saws, I think the idea of 'proper maintenance' may vary somewhat depending on the person. ...


8

I don't think you can sharpen a Forstner bit accurately enough with abrasive paper. Even if you glue it to a small slips of wood to make rudimentary files from it these won't be particularly stiff so may not give you the accuracy you'd want to properly sharpen a bit, where as much as possible you want to maintain the existing geometry of the factory grind. ...


7

You've identified the conundrum- anything that lubricates the bearing surfaces will also collect sawdust. There's nothing in my experience that a) lubricates parts and b) repels dust effectively. If your saw is hard to raise or tilt, try a spray lubricant containing lithium grease on the gears and the corresponding shafts. If that doesn't help, check the (...


7

As far as rust-prevention goes, I would caution being very sceptical about the results of published comparative tests. Every one I've seen done by a commercial publication, without a single exception, would fall short of a proper scientific comparison. Some even acknowledge this in the text! So they are far from definitive and the wildly differing results ...


7

It sounds like your drill has Nickel Cadmium (also called NiCd or NiCad) batteries. This type of battery self-discharges very rapidly and will not hold a charge as long as a Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) or Lithium-based battery (such as Lithium-ion or Lithium-polymer). Matt's answer includes a lot of technical detail on how to best store and maintain your ...


7

I am trying to figure out if there are any differences between the two that would make me want to choose one over the other. There is really only one significant difference I can see between the two examples you posted. The diamond plates in your first example are solid plates with a consistent diamond grit across the entire surface. I own one of these ...


7

What LeeG's answer covers is pretty spot on when it comes to build up of dust on the motor and the hidden areas. There is really no inherent harm in trying to clean the tools after every use (sort of somehow pushing dust into a crevice I suppose) except for maybe being an exercise in futility. Not to condone it but my 12 inch mitre saw has hardened sawdust ...


7

TL;DR warning. Rinsing is, usually, only the first step in brush cleaning. Many paints and varnishes will state on the label that brushes should be washed after use and if this advice is followed properly you'll never have a brush dry stiff or hard. You don't need to beat yourself up about your brush having dried hard, it has happened to almost everyone at ...


7

The simplest solution of all is seems to be to just to buy plastic end caps/edge protectors, which are available from some online tool vendors: But these have a few problems. The available sizes won't fit all chisel widths you might eventually collect (both Imperial and metric), and while you can always go up a size in theory as vintage chisels are often ...


6

Unless there's enough rust to weld parts together or leave a surface pitted and uneven beyond repair, I've never had it be the reason for walking away from a hand plane. The first thing I check is the quality of the plane iron. Flip the lever on the cap and pull off the blade and chip breaker. Learn to do this quickly so that you can get it apart faster ...


6

It shouldn't be making that sound. The first unloaded run is how the saw should sound, even when it's loaded. Have you inspected the belt for flaws? The frequency of the "rattle" seems a little high for a single nick, but if there are a few in a row, I could see that being the problem. My other thought is that you've got a bad bearing somewhere. My first ...


6

Setting the teeth has a few benefits: It creates a kerf wider than the body of the blade, which does indeed reduce the chance of a catch / buckle- this is nominally more important in western-style push saws than in japanese-style pull saws. You can stil have a bound blade if there are stresses in the wood that tend to cause the kerf to close. A wider kerf ...


6

A graphite lubricant like type used for locks would work well and typically has no solvent or has a carrier that flashes off immediately. But I imagine it will not last long because some of the graphite powder will be carried away by sawdust each time you clean the saw out. EDIT: Paste wax will help to prevent rust buildup on exposed steel and iron parts. ...


6

The diamond stone with holes in the diamond surface will usher away the metal shaved off the blade and thus makes the sharpening process faster. It is also easier to clean up. However it is less suitable for pointy tools such as needles or awls as they could dig into the edges. For those tools continuous surface is better. For regular stuff like knives both ...


6

How can I safely clean and restore the surface? If the cleaner that was used has chemically altered the surface of the top, there's not much you can do aside from remove the discolored areas. Unfortunately, you set yourself up for an uneven top if you to that, so I'd advise against it. If it's just a cosmetic blemish, I'd leave it alone. Otherwise, if it'...


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