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23

It has to do with the rotation of the bit. In a normal cut, the work piece is fed against the rotation. A normal cut works like this (shown for freehand): The cutting action will pull the work piece into the bit. The other cut, is known as a climbing cut. It pushes the work piece away from the bit. A climbing cut will have less tear out, but requires ...


17

The main advantage of using straight bits seems to be that they are cheaper, and easier to re-sharpen. They are perfectly fine for a number of uses though, especially where finish isn't particularly important. Downcut and upcut bits generally give a better cut and are easier to use when working with a handheld/manual-feed router. This is because instead of ...


16

It is generally advisable to take multiple passes with a router when removing large amounts of material. Adjusting your feed rate might also help It's also a good practice to make some test cuts on some scrap material in order to ensure your depth of cut and feed rate won't cause any problems. Doing this also gives you an opportunity to "sneak up" on the ...


15

If you can follow my additions to your drawing, I'm hoping it will explain. If you work it this way, you can make a lap joint, and you should be able to have the clean joint you are looking for: Route to the end of the left board, then extend just the top portion of the right board to match the notch. This should give you the crisp corner you are looking ...


13

The bit they are using in that picture has a bearing on the top part that is sticking out of the table (which is actually the bottom of the bit, because routers are inverted in a router table). Bits with bearings like that are safe to operate without a fence, because the bearing spins, acting as a guide as the stock is pushed along the bit. It doesn't matter ...


13

I don't think there are any woodworking router bits that were designed to handle metal screws in the wood being cut. Carbide bits will certainly cut the screws (as carbide is much harder than the steel in the screws) but the screws will definitely chip the cutters on the bits. HSS probably won't fair all that well. You might consider trying metalworking CNC ...


12

For cuts with a router, slow also can mean burnt material. If I have a complex profile to cut, I either break it into multiple passes with multiple bits, or I sneak up on it, going slightly deeper each pass. Some folks also make a deep pass at close to the final depth, then make another shallow, fast pass at final depth to finish up the cut. e.g.


12

When I cut at 1/4" depth and 1/2" width, it works fine. When I increase it to 3/8" depth the wood splinters. In addition to the Answer given by @Steven already, it may be a good idea to score the fibers that outline the sides of the cut prior to performing routing operations. Oak is notorious for splintering due to its open grain. This can easily be done ...


11

I'm thinking of using a bigger core box bit on my drill press to make the four corners. I'm trying to avoid my plunge router due to possible side movements while plunging. I've heard of people using a router bit in a drill press, but I've never heard a reputable source recommend doing it. Personally, I wouldn't try it myself. A drill press runs 10-100x ...


11

A router spins at around 20,000 RPM. Your drill, at top speed, is closer to 300 RPM. Very different animal.


11

I'm embarrassed to say that I guess I didn't really read enough articles on router bits.. and I was running it way too fast. Needed to slow the router down to around ~18k (speed ~2). So I ran out to the garage to try it out and.. the tear out isn't gone, but it's not nearly as bad. I have a feeling that if the bit I was using was a freshly sharpened one, it ...


10

Always make sure your bits are sharp and take small bites with the router. If the router bit travels too slowly, it can burn and/or burnish your workpiece. Heat from taking too large a bite or moving slowly can also destroy the temper on the router bit, causing it to dull faster and/or break. Carbide bits are more resistant to heat than high-speed steel ...


10

The direction of the cut makes a difference. Normally we cut against the spin of the bit, clockwise on the inside of a frame and counterclockwise on the outside. If you are concerned about burns, you can go with the spin of the bit(a climb cut) rather than against it. It's even more important to make shallow cuts with this, because a deep cut can make the ...


10

I have never sharpened my router bits (they are all the nice ones with the carbide cutters). However, pitch will develop on them after some use. I just use a bit cleaning solution I got from Woodcraft (I am sure you can use cheaper alternatives with the same result) and a brass brush to clean the pitch off. Make sure you use a brass brush and not a steel ...


10

Use the router table if the piece is too small to have the router base firm against the work piece. Use the router freehand if the piece is too large to safely move across the router table. If using the router freehand, plan on using some sort of jig or fixture to direct the router. A guide bearing on the bit works as a sort of jig. In general, if ...


10

First, to answer your 3 questions: Yes, you can safely make a 50mm deep cut with a handheld router, but only if you take several passes, only cutting part of the depth at a time. If you try to make the entire cut in one pass, you'll very likely either damage the bit, stall your router, injure yourself, or some combination of these. There are certainly ...


10

Is it okay to use my plunge router on my router table? Is it safe? Yes, it's okay to use a plunge router in a router table, but some work better than others. Safety practices might vary depending on the type of mechanism your setup uses for the router lift, but generally speaking, using a plunge router in a router table is just as safe as using a fixed-base ...


10

In short: No, no, no. You can technically do this, unluckily, but it is highly inadvisable. It is a pity that it just looks like one could do it (1/2'' is not far off compared to 12mm, and 1/4'' is even closer to 6mm) and that with some luck, it indeed seems to "work just fine". That is true for the other way around, too. You can hardly tell a difference ...


10

I think you may be misunderstanding what a CNC motor is. The CNC motors are stepper motors, and they can be precisely directed to move the X, Y, and Z axes of a CNC machine They need the appropriate signal to tell them to spin, and by what amount. A CNC router still has a regular router attached to it. This picture may be helpful (image from probotix.com): ...


9

Sharpening bits after every use sounds like a really bad advice. Not only is the router bit getting smaller every time (no joke!), so eventually you will notice that this 6mm plywood that you're trying to stick into the 6mm groove made with your 6mm dado bit wont't fit for some weird reason. Also you may eventually notice that those identical pieces that ...


9

Sure. In the picture above, the bit has a bearing on it, which sort of acts as a fence. I have that exact set of Woodpecker's radius jigs and use them exactly as pictured. I don't know what purpose there would be in using a non-bearing bit on a router table without a fence or some sort of fixture to guide the cut, but you could do it. You will often see ...


9

Lamination FTW If the chair were a different type I'd have suggested solid wood (note: grain must go horizontally), but not for one like this. Laminating up a curved plywood back is the way to go here IMO as already suggested in @keshlam's Answer. Only one potential problem with this plan, and that is getting the thick veneers to do the lamination or cutting ...


9

A 2" ball end router bit, and a plunge router with adequate power to run it, and which can run slowly enough to run it safely (large diameter bits must not spin too fast.) Or (these days) a CNC router with a considerably smaller bit (round-nose would still be best for the end result) programmed to go around in circles and cut the shape. For only a few, ...


8

An oft overlooked reason for burning is excessive pitch build up on the bits. Use a bit cleaner (I use Simple Green) and nylon or brass brush to clean the bit and it will cut much cleaner.


8

You should use spiral blade bits whenever you can, that is: You do not need a diameter that is too large (spiral router bits cannot have a diameter larger than the shaft, so you're limited to 12mm or so maximum). No ball bearing needed for guidance, usually spiral cutters don't have these (though, as pointed out by Rob, you can find them). You don't mind ...


8

How can I easily install the bits in the router at the correct height? The first time you use the set: Install one cutter to a height that looks right for your lumber. Make a on a test piece. Label this piece so that you'll remember that it's not scrap. Make sure that you mark the side of the piece that was against the router's base plate. Switch to the ...


8

It depends on your pattern Most of the suggestions on the web refer to using the jigsaw for cutting patterns. It is the ideal choice for this work as some patterns are intricate with arcs and what not. What you could do with the jigsaw is use your template as a guide. If your arcs or curves are simple enough you can shift the template down from where the ...


8

I can't tell from this picture exactly but it is worth pointing out that this frame might not all be made of wood and wood elements (not that you were suggesting this). The items you see in section B and C could very well be made from clay/plastic molds and then glued into place. It is possible that one of these pieces of flair to be carved by hand, to ...


8

Planing by hand would be the standard response for any hand-tool aficionado, as this is how chamfers were done before power tools came along. This can be done freehand, by planing to marked or gauged lines on the face and edges, but it's easier to use some kind of chamfering jig if accuracy and repeatability are desired. Because I'm presuming you'll want to ...


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