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10

I think you may be misunderstanding what a CNC motor is. The CNC motors are stepper motors, and they can be precisely directed to move the X, Y, and Z axes of a CNC machine They need the appropriate signal to tell them to spin, and by what amount. A CNC router still has a regular router attached to it. This picture may be helpful (image from probotix.com): ...


9

Lamination FTW If the chair were a different type I'd have suggested solid wood (note: grain must go horizontally), but not for one like this. Laminating up a curved plywood back is the way to go here IMO as already suggested in @keshlam's Answer. Only one potential problem with this plan, and that is getting the thick veneers to do the lamination or cutting ...


6

I can't imagine a bit capable of milling metal having any difficulty whatsoever dealing with fir or walnut. However I don't know you can assume that a metal-cutting bit will leave a particularly good surface on wood because of the different edge geometry (similar to twist drills, where metal-specific ones are subtly different to general-purpose or wood-...


5

When drilling screw holes for acrylic should I make it slightly larger than the actual diameter of the screw hole so that it does not crack? Very much yes. You're not drilling pilot holes here, you're drilling clearance holes which are completely different. See more in this previous Answer. Depth of the screw hole for the birch plywood. Would 3/4" ...


5

If the back is curved, I would suggest laminating layers of bending plywood over a form to get that curve, then trim to the oval shape with bandsaw/saber saw/handsaw, a trifle oversize, then file/rasp/sand to final shape and size.


5

How seamless does this need to be? Cuts along the wood's grain can often be glued back together almost undetectably, if you're careful. Bent lamination could be done, but the connection to face and back would not be seamless -- grain wouldn't match. There would also be a grain mismatch seam where the laminate ends meet, unless you are careful and/or lucky, ...


5

It would appear that you are agreeable to learning new software. One product pops into my alleged mind when you ask for a "do it all" type of program. Fusion 360 is free for students, hobbyists and for business that produce below a certain level of income (or is it profit) using the software. For the DIY fellows and gals and hobbyists, it is required to ...


4

I am assuming by CNC machine, you mean a router. The blue line section that is horizontal will be a regular 90 degree cut. The sections of the blue line that are on the curves will have an increasing large fillet as it approaches the bottom of the cut, unless you have a 4th axis on your CNC to rotate the item. The cuts on the curves will also not be ...


4

I agree with Graphus, however also be careful of the max. RPM of the tools, since metal-cutting tools are often designed to run more slowly than woodworking tools.


4

There are a variety of options out there similar to what you are describing. These are the first two that come to mind: Rockler Hold Down Clamp Bessey Hold Down


4

When drilling screw holes for acrylic should I make it slightly larger than the actual diameter of the screw hole so that it does not crack? If you're planning to have the screws thread into the acrylic, I would make them slightly undersize and then tap the acrylic. If the screws just pass through the acrylic (and are threaded into something else), then ...


4

For a router table, light weight is not an advantage; more power is. (When handheld, the equation may or may not go the other way depending on what you are doing. Which is the reason, other than price, that a range of offerings exists.) CNC routing motors tend to be equivalent to trim routers, or even lower power, since they aren't asked to cut quickly or ...


3

I am trying to minimise screws showing. The approach shown by the red screws in your diagram will be visible even if you counterbore and plug. Furniture block joint An alternative is to use battens on the insides of the corners and use screws from the inside. Or just glue it if you have (or can buy/borrow) a couple of clamps. This is the sort of joint you ...


3

The other answers seem to have covered your main questions, but there's something you may not have considered - if the boards are to be cut by CNC router then you will not get sharp internal corners (e.g. 90° degree cuts), instead these will have a small fillet (radius between corners) due to the way the router works. The radius of the fillet will be the ...


2

Figured it out after watching a Youtube video. In short, two vector paths need to be selected for the pocket cut path (a starting and ending vector).


2

Our engineers sometimes do this, usually testing the stability of the spindle and the fuselage, but not too long, and the original drill bit can be used for very thin aluminum panels. For environments where the voltage is not stable enough, the use of metal-specific drill bits is very dangerous. The coil of the motor controls the power, and the difference is ...


2

The obvious thought would be to clamp a clamp to the table -- perhaps a small wooden handscrew clamp, or something homebrewed from threaded rod or from bolts and threaded inserts. Presumably you would want the jaws to be wood or some other sacrificial material, so if your programming goes outside the bounds of the piece being worked on, deliberately or by ...


2

You can create the outer shape by making a template for the back, cutting the workpiece to rough shape with the saw of your choice (probably bandsaw or jigsaw if using power tools), and using a router with a pattern bit or guide bushing. You can either make the template for the entire back, or slightly more than half of the back (since the left and right ...


2

A CNC is definitely overkill here. You can use a drill or drill press to remove the bulk of waste, then use chisels to square up the hole and clean up the corners. Then use the chisel to score and pare away the little lip. That said, with chipboard you may have some difficulty, so I would suggest just cutting out a section slightly larger than the area ...


1

You didn't state if this is molded from one piece of material (ie. a tree trunk) First a direct answer to your question of cutting a "square" with a CNC router: The closest thing you can get is to use the SMALLEST bit you can find and cut very, very slowly so you don't break the bit. This will create very small small rounded corners that, at a distance, ...


1

Found these bits on Amazon https://www.amazon.ca/Degree-Straight-Shank-Dovetail-Cutter/dp/B01JUDP12E/ref=sr_1_7?keywords=dovetail+bit+45+degree&qid=1556519761&s=gateway&sr=8-7 Little bit odd with all the flutes but I think it'll do just fine at least in the short run.


1

You want a 45 degree inverted chamfer bit. Many of these will have a bearing on the bottom - this will be removable, but there might still be a nub that keeps it from cutting flush. Maybe you could grind it off?


1

To do these chair legs you would need a large mill with rotary table to carve the legs on all sides $$$$. The mill uses a circular cutter which will leave rounded corners. Freeman earlier said it would take some skill to do the 3D design. To see just how difficult install Fusion 360, one of the most popular programs to handle something of this complexity. ...


1

I don't think it makes much difference. If you have a smaller cutter you can move the cutter faster; if you have a larger cutter you will have to move it slower. The limiting factor is how fast the motor can cut wood. Obviously if you use an extremely thin cutter your CNC machine won't be able to move fast enough, and if you use an extremely large cutter ...


1

will it be easy to cut the square inner corners manually afterwards with enough precision for the parts to match? Yes. This sort of trimming is a trivial job (a couple of minutes) and can be done with a purpose-made tool, the corner chisel, with a conventional chisel or using a rasp or file if necessary*. But in reality you don't have to get the inside ...


1

There's actually nothing in that drawing that a CNC router can't do... you're thinking of square internal corners of a pocket but this is not that. If you're doing a rabbet with a square-tip cutter then you absolutely can achieve what you've drawn, unless there's some part of that drawing I'm misunderstanding. Edit: If you do need to machine them in the ...


1

The plywood will hold up but the edges will look like plywood sooner than later. Keep in mind that the original wood managed to last 150 years and probably failed from lapse of maintenance. I would recommend using solid wood and my first choice would be white oak. I would avoid Teak, though it has excellent rot resistance, it is an oily wood and would ...


1

For a professional result I would suggest using two tools, a handheld drill and a handheld jigsaw. First draw a rectangle with a marking pencil the size and shape of the USB port cage. Wear safety goggles! Second use the drill with a bit with a diameter slightly wider than the width of the jigsaw blade and smaller than the USB port cage. Drill a hole at ...


1

Milling cutters can be used to cut wood. Milling cutters and router bits have different geometry that recognizes much higher SFM used for wood and plastic. A milling cutter can, of course, be run at high SFM in wood. One thing to be cautious of is chip removal. If you are edge milling it is not an issue, but if you milling a pocket then you could get ...


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