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7

What are the functional differences between a leg and front vise? I think you've already hit on them pretty well in your Question. Leg vise can be built from solely wood components and has a deep throat. It also is the largest of all bench vises from what I can tell. A "con" could be that a traditional leg vise relies on a parallel bar at the ...


6

Should I not bother with these workbench features as they might not be suited for softwood? Example being I can see a holdfast wearing out a dog hole fairly quickly if used regularly. To clarify I am not concerned with the appearance but functionality of a bench with these features. I built my Roubo workbench out of southern pine, and I can tell you that ...


6

The problem with using a vice like that on a drill press is that it is difficult to keep the work piece in the same plane as the table of the drill press. If the piece is canted then your holes will not be perpendicular. Personally, I have a couple of vises for my drill press, but never use them for wood. I more typically use a clamp or just a fence.


5

You can buy the vise screw pre-made if it's going to save you a lot of headache, but you can also make a screw of a custom size, in hardwood, by making your own tap and die. The DIY tap and dies work in principle identically to the ones you have in your garrettwade link. And tap and dies for wood operate identically to those used by ironworkers on metal. ...


5

Another name for cam-style clamps is eccentric clamp, named after the eccentric circle principal that it uses -- the rod goes through the black plastic cams closer to one end than the other, so when you rotate the rod, the portion of the cam between the rod and the clamped surface increases, providing clamping power. But, searching for that doesn't get me ...


5

Leg vise can be built from solely wood components and has a deep throat. Yes, but actually any type of vice can be built entirely from wood if needed or desired (as many were in the past). It usually requires that the components are scaled up somewhat for needed strength, but in essence you're just substituting a threaded wooden dowel for any threaded ...


4

Excellent answer already from grfrazee, just wanted to add some practical options. The tool to use would be one just like this (but not necessarily this one): I see in the Comments that you say this isn't terribly expensive but I'd like to offer a cheaper alternative to anyone for whom $50 or so, for a seldom-used tool, might be a bit much. Behold: Yes, ...


4

If I am going to make threaded dowel for a vise what do I need to consider. I can think of two things. Wood Something like a maple; at least a hardwood minimum I think you'll find that a lot of larger threaded screws made of wood (in the USA, at least) were/are made of hard maple. This is what Lake Erie Toolworks uses for their vise screws. Hard maple is a ...


4

There are a variety of options out there similar to what you are describing. These are the first two that come to mind: Rockler Hold Down Clamp Bessey Hold Down


4

Should I not bother with these workbench features as they might not be suited for softwood? I was going to suggest in a Comment that a complete list of the features you might like to add would be useful, for replies to be as comprehensive as possible by going through them as a checklist. But actually I couldn't think of any feature that would be precluded ...


4

It's perfectly ok to have the vise mounted lower than the benchtop for exactly the reason of flattening the benchtop later. Also, it is common to drill or cut dog holes into the benchtop in-line with a vise so you can use bench dogs (pegs) to increase your clamping capacity far beyond the typical 4-8" of an inexpensive vise. The vise pictured in your ...


4

Yes. You can use anything that will hold wood to hold wood. Over the centuries this has meant just pushing the wood against a nail or other projection from a bench or beam that you're working on (a method still in common use today all over the world1), wooden holdfasts made from a Y-shaped branching of a tree or bush and eventually the iron or steel versions ...


3

I would recommend buying the vise screw only because they offer a larger diameter screw. The larger screw means beefier threads and more bearing surface resulting in more clamping force available or less likely to fail. That said, if you are not abusive to the 1-1/2" screw you should have a good amount of clamping force available. I would recommend the Beall ...


3

Where you have your vice placed for the photos is pretty much exactly where I'd mount it, in addition to the front-back placement being ideal it appears to be nearly directly over a leg which gives plenty of support for any heavier work you may do on it. And yes, it is perfectly fine to mount a vice with a little (and sometimes a bit more than that!) of the ...


3

This is not generally done, although I'm sure I have seen the vice being used for glueing up certain jobs, mostly between the jaws, I can't remember the sources. One passing reference to this the poster said he'd never do it again though, since the glue dripped onto the vice screw and guide rods and made a mess that was tough to clean up. Too much strain ...


3

I'm wondering if a normal bench vise like this one can be used for a drill press as substitution for the specialised one. There is no reason why it can't. The only thing is for the "regular" bench vise, you will have to make extra checks that the piece you are drilling is presented to the drill bit at the correct angle since the regular vise does not have ...


3

I suspect that for your bench dogs, the big factor will be how thick your bench top is. With oak I suspect you can get away with 3/4" board for a while, though 2" might be better. For pine, I would say a minimum of 2", 3 would be better 4 would be very solid and last a long time (also allowing the top to be sanded flat a few times too!). The thicker the ...


3

Am I missing something? Yep. This drawing from Shigshop shows the part that is not visible in your photos. Under the slide, mounted in the leg, is a wheel/bearing that allows the lower part of the chop to move in without binding. The chain keeps the far end of the slide at a constant height which keeps it from binding. Shigshop is also a source ...


2

I am having a hard time to try and explain this but the jist of it is that the whole chop and parallel bar move together simultaneously. The chain ensures that both move at a steady rate. When installed properly of course. Some people comment that it does not move as fluidly as a normal parallel bar would (some resistance when turning the wheel). ...


2

I have used a regular vise many times on a couple of drill presses and on a milling machine. Because sometimes you just need a bigger vise. I wouldn't recommend it for precision work, mostly because bench vises are designed to be able to clamp a wide variety of objects rather than to easily reproduce particular clamping configurations. So expect to ...


2

The obvious thought would be to clamp a clamp to the table -- perhaps a small wooden handscrew clamp, or something homebrewed from threaded rod or from bolts and threaded inserts. Presumably you would want the jaws to be wood or some other sacrificial material, so if your programming goes outside the bounds of the piece being worked on, deliberately or by ...


2

Remember a workbench doesn't need a vice at all and start from there :-) Because of the nearly universal mounting of vices to Western workbenches it is hard to think outside the box but spend some time brainstorming the various ways a vice might not be used for holding workpieces of various types and you're sure to come up with some reasonable alternatives. ...


2

Dieter Schmid sells wooden threading tools of larger diameters, but the 2 1/2" set will set you back about $1350. So, if your goal is to build a workbench, Lake Erie is probably a better deal. You would need to make 8 screws to break even (at least three workbenches for any reasonable vise configuration). Something to consider, though, is that you would be ...


2

Lee Valley and Rockler both sell cam levers that can apply a surprising amount of force over a short range, and these could easily be used to bear down on a clamping bar to create much the same kind of clamp that you see in dovetail jigs. The one Lee Valley sells looks like this: Leigh sells two varieties of the clamping mechanism that it uses in its own ...


2

Because of cost, I'll probably have to laminate 2 pieces of wood together to form the chop, rather than using a single thick piece. This can be stronger and more stable than one solid piece so it's often a good way to go anyway. If the piece or pieces you get are flat-sawn, alternate the grain as in the vice bottom-left of the image in this Answer. My ...


1

As you tighten the vise your dog will place all the pressure from tightening the vise on the outerlayer of wood in the chop. I would recommend at least one inch of hardwood onm the outside face of the chop. The inside face need not be as thick since it will not be compressed during tightening, so about 1/2" should do it. All told this would result in 2 1/4"...


1

Not sure there's an ideal solution here so you might have to bite the bullet and accept the best fix from a list where none are very satisfying). Somehow adding 4.5" of extra wood onto the end of the table to make up this difference. Not so sure about this Well FWIW tail vices do sometimes have very massive chops so yours wouldn't be the first with a ...


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