43

Ashler's answer is the simplest and cheapest way to get holes the same depth. But as an extra there are bit collars that can be put on the bits which will enforce exact depth stops.


38

A lot of people drill a hole through a suitable length of wood dowel (or small square cross section) and use that as a stop-collar on the drill. Example You can also just use an external chunk of wood Example One benefit of both these is you don't need an Allen key and can very quickly swap back and forth between two or more different depths (useful for ...


27

The simplest means is to place a tab of masking tape on the drill bit at the desired depth. When the spinning tab lowers to the surface of the wood and sweeps away the wood chips, stop.


24

Counter-sinking prevents murder. (that is, wood grain murder) Driving a screw into a hole that isn't counter-sunk will have a very small point of contact, which exerts brutal sheer forces and tears the wood grain apart. Hammering in a nail is pretty much the only thing you could do worse. A counter-sunk screw, on the other hand, has a large contact ...


24

Keyed chucks still get a better grip on any bit. I'm willing to use keyless on my portable drill -- though mine will take a key too, and there are times when I use it. I wouldn't trust keyless on a drill press.


21

You can also adjust your drill press table to be at the desired depth when the drill reaches the end of it's stroke.


18

Tape is what I would have suggested and continue to use but if you wanted something a little more robust my suggestion would be depth stop collars /nuts Image from AliExpress Easily removed off the bits and adjustable as well which tape would not be as much.


18

Lee Valley (I'm sure you can get it elsewhere) sells a product called an Oops Arbor that allows you to mount two hole saws to a single arbor. The smaller one is held further out from the larger one allowing it to support itself as it drills.


17

Similar to bowlturner's answer, my answer depends on having access to a drill press. However, I suggest you use a few jigs. I've done similar projects, and the biggest problem is that a forstner bit tends to skate around when you're dealing with angles that steep. (There's nothing for the center point to grab into until you're 1/2 way through the piece.) ...


15

As @keshlam pointed out. My drill presses both have keyed chucks and it allows much greater torque to put a stronger clamp on the bit. This is really important for larger bits when you get over 1 1/2" say for keyhole saws or large Forstner bits. There can be a lot of resistance and I don't think most keyless chucks can do the job. Even there I've had a ...


13

I saw a video online, that suggested a simple jig that will allow you to drill straight into a relatively flat surface. Take a piece of stock that is square. From the end of the stock, cut a wedge section that is 90° in the wedge (the left inner face should be 90° from the right inner face) and the wedge vertex (the line in the middle of the removed ...


13

Personally, I would use my drill press. The bed will tilt to any angle and then you just clamp the board to the bed. You would need a piece of waste wood under the board so not to put the bit into the metal bed. I think Forstner bits would be the better idea for doing this though using a spade bit might be possible, if you lower it slow enough, I don't ...


12

You can buy countersink bits for your drill or hand-driven countersinks. Countersinking helps you set all the screws to a consistent depth without any danger of splitting or denting the wood. The countersink provides a crisp circle around the screw head. As Matt mentioned in his comment, you can buy self-countersinking screws which ream out some of the ...


11

Yes, there are hollow screw extractors like you describe, such as these two examples: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/set3hollowscrewextractors.aspx http://www.amazon.com/WoodRiver-Screw-Extractor-1-4/dp/B0032YWQ26 Unfortunately, they may be difficult to get started if you're unable to fit the part into a drill press and you aren't able to make a pilot ...


11

I'm thinking of using a bigger core box bit on my drill press to make the four corners. I'm trying to avoid my plunge router due to possible side movements while plunging. I've heard of people using a router bit in a drill press, but I've never heard a reputable source recommend doing it. Personally, I wouldn't try it myself. A drill press runs 10-100x ...


11

As bowlturner mentioned, a drill press with a Forstner bit is the first solution that comes to mind. If you don't have a drill press, another solution is to cut the corner off a block of scrap wood at a 45-degree angle. Use a brad point, auger, or twist bit to drill straight through the newly-cut end, and clamp it to your workpiece for each hole. If you've ...


11

Yes, it's possible to wear out an impact driver, but what you're describing sounds normal. The driver will act as a normal drill until it exceeds its "normal driving" capacity, then the internal hammers will engage and you'll hear a whacking/clicking/grinding sound. The sound is similar to that of the clutch when you're using the clutch. Some impact ...


11

This is the type of question that unfortunately tends to yield primarily opinion-based answers, but I think it's one of a number of exceptions to this being a bad fit for SE. My answer is a definitive yes. Not only do I think hand drills have a place in the modern woodworking shop — regardless of the dominance of power tools otherwise — there are many cases ...


10

The short answer is to use a guide. You can take a larger piece of hardwood and drill a hole of the larger size through it, then clamp it over the hole you wish to enlarge. If you're lucky and the hole you wish to embiggen is the 'next' size up, a step drill bit may work, too.


10

If you use some sort of bushing to guide the drill and keep it on course. I use these from Big Gator Tools at Woodcraft.


10

A drill guide will help you maintain the required angle, in your case, 90 degrees perpendicular to the desk. These are readily available at your local home improvement or tool store. Drill Guide http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/400/05/05534eb7-0230-4b1d-9f68-f9297f412a6f_400.jpg


10

In two words: Pilot hole If you have a drill with the handy leveling bubble, this can be handy. Otherwise line up your drill bit using something akin to a speed square or carpenters square (checking more than 1 axis), then drill your pilot hole. Not only is the pilot hole beneficial, but I find it makes your accustomed to what arrangement/direction you will ...


10

Finding the center Using Geometry There are a couple of ways to do this. Since your dowel is big enough you can do this by hand relatively easy. First would be to make 3 lines on the outside of the dowel the cross 2 different points along the circumference (each line). Then draw 3 perpendicular lines from the center of those lines. The point where all ...


9

Yes, small drill bits can break easily. Some manufacturers offer multi-packs of a single size drill bit. Multi-packs are also available for 1/4" hex shank bits. Some high-end drill bits are more durable. Recently at The Woodworking Shows I also saw a demonstration by a drill bit vendor drilling through files and brake rotors. First he drilled through with ...


8

I have not seen the type of adjustable hole saw you describe, perhaps it's a regional thing (I'm on the west coast USA), but the type I'm familiar with have a spring loaded collar with "drive pins" that mate with holes in the bottom of the saw bit itself. I would buy mandrel like this: And a hole bit of the appropriate size which threads onto the collar ...


8

I saw an ad on a woodworking site and I was reminded of this question. These were touched on in other answers but I wanted to add something more concrete with a picture as an aid. The following is a picture of a drill guide. This would be used with your regular powered hand drill. You can see that the underside has 45 degree angle to as so you could also ...


8

The most basic step is making a jig. Clamp the jig to your drill press table and you can just put in the blank press it up against the stops and drill down and put the piece on the result pile. You can also center-punch the holes before drilling. This will help align the drill bit to where the hole should go. Put some wood screws through a piece of scrap ...


8

That's a push drill, sometimes referred to as a "Yankee drill". It has the advantage of working in some places where you can't fit a crank or brace-and-bit.


8

I would be tempted to try and use a flexible drill bit. I have a small cheap set that are about 6" long. Can't find a picture of them online. But there are many different kinds out there and many different price points but here's an example of them. Either there was an edit or I missed the part about filling and redrilling the old holes. My two ...


8

Table size matters, but it's common to add your own table -- many drill presses come set up with a table that's better for metalworking than woodworking. Ease of adjusting the table matters. You want a table that can be reliably brought back to level... or you can leave it level and use a jig when drilling on an angle, which some find easier. You want a ...


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