13

Generally, that is the right thing to do. Obviously you wouldn't let a power tool run all day when you don't need it, or even walk away and let it run unattended. But keeping it running in between making several cuts in a couple of work pieces or drilling several holes is absolutely fine (I am almost inclined to say "best practice"). For the tool as well ...


13

The bit they are using in that picture has a bearing on the top part that is sticking out of the table (which is actually the bottom of the bit, because routers are inverted in a router table). Bits with bearings like that are safe to operate without a fence, because the bearing spins, acting as a guide as the stock is pushed along the bit. It doesn't matter ...


10

Is it okay to use my plunge router on my router table? Is it safe? Yes, it's okay to use a plunge router in a router table, but some work better than others. Safety practices might vary depending on the type of mechanism your setup uses for the router lift, but generally speaking, using a plunge router in a router table is just as safe as using a fixed-base ...


10

Use the router table if the piece is too small to have the router base firm against the work piece. Use the router freehand if the piece is too large to safely move across the router table. If using the router freehand, plan on using some sort of jig or fixture to direct the router. A guide bearing on the bit works as a sort of jig. In general, if ...


10

I think you may be misunderstanding what a CNC motor is. The CNC motors are stepper motors, and they can be precisely directed to move the X, Y, and Z axes of a CNC machine They need the appropriate signal to tell them to spin, and by what amount. A CNC router still has a regular router attached to it. This picture may be helpful (image from probotix.com): ...


9

Sure. In the picture above, the bit has a bearing on it, which sort of acts as a fence. I have that exact set of Woodpecker's radius jigs and use them exactly as pictured. I don't know what purpose there would be in using a non-bearing bit on a router table without a fence or some sort of fixture to guide the cut, but you could do it. You will often see ...


8

I think that could work, but I've seen a (imo) better way done by the Samurai Carpenter on Youtube. There is also an instructable for such a sled. \o/ (Image from instructables.com, made by user robot-six) He attaches guides on either side of the board that is to be planed/jointed and builds himself a sled for his router with which he subsequently takes ...


7

Plunge cuts on a router table are done by lowering the wood onto the spinning bit, holding it against the fence to stabilize it. A higher-than-usual fence may help. Featherboards pushing the work piece agains the fence definitely help. Marks can be made on the fence to indicate where the board should be at the start and end of the cut, so you can align the ...


6

For edge routing, you need a tall router-table fence. Clamped to your router table, this provides a perpendicular surface to guide your boards past the bit. As the linked should point out, the bit gets buried into the fence's surface (ather than trapping the workpiece between the bit and fence which would almost certainly cause a high-speed kickback ...


6

Larger bits will generally recommend that they be used in a router table or with a speed control or both. That bit is spinning very fast. Even with a small-radius bit it's moving past the wood at a pretty good clip. Increase the radius, and the linear speed at which the bit hits the wood also increases by the same ratio. If a large bit takes too deep a cut ...


6

I would guess it is more profile and how much wood you both expect to remove and how much surface area you have in contact with the wood. The shank size is only the first indication. I haven't seen any 1/4" bits that 'Need' to be mounted in a router table. However that doesn't mean that you can't benefit from doing so. The larger shank bits allow for a ...


6

I think most router tables are set up to use a fixed-base router. For example, the Jess-Em Mast-R-Lift pictured below specifies using a fixed base router. The lift mechanism itself provides the height adjustment, thus the plunge function of the router is redundant. I don't think it's unsafe to use a plunge-type router with a lift so long as you have the ...


6

Kickback can definitely happen with a handheld router. It's important to use the correct feed direction (typically moving the router from left to right) to prevent it. There are two reasons I can think of why it might be called out more in a router table than with a handheld router: You can take off more material and use a bigger bit with a router table. ...


6

This is what the Shopsmith brand tools are known for. They sell tools in a couple of different configurations, such as the Shopsmith Mark V or the Shopsmith Mark 7. Different configurations allow you to set up the tool and use it as a variety of different shop tools, depending on what is supported by the particular model: Table saw Lathe Drill press Disc ...


5

Plunge router in router table? It is definitively possible (and safe). You should make sure your router has enough power, though. A router of the "1000W class" is not very suitable, although it is of course still possible to use it in a router table. However, first of all, it will be a bit weak, and on top of that the smaller models have a smaller routing ...


5

You can use a roundover bit in a router You can use a router table or not, and there are several different size roundover bits. In your picture, it looks like maybe a 1/8" bit was used. You can also round over the edges slightly while sanding. This may be the better option if your picture frame isn't very big and/or you're not looking for a big roundover. ...


4

As others have said, yes it will work, but but... 1) It's more common to mount a fixed-depth base in the table, and switch the router motor between that and a plunge base for other work. Fixed bases are relatively cheap, which makes dedicating one to this purpose a good choice, and many routers are available as kits with one base of each type precisely for ...


4

For what it's worth, your DeWalt 625 will not work with most router lifts on the market. Most lifts are designed to work with a removable motor from a fixed-base router, and you'll need to look into a different solution such as one of those that I suggested in my answer to other router question that you referenced. The DeWalt 625 is a plunge router with an ...


4

For a router table, light weight is not an advantage; more power is. (When handheld, the equation may or may not go the other way depending on what you are doing. Which is the reason, other than price, that a range of offerings exists.) CNC routing motors tend to be equivalent to trim routers, or even lower power, since they aren't asked to cut quickly or ...


4

Use a blank insert for your router table insert plate - assuming you have one. There is one pictured in this set of five. (shown below)


4

Plexiglass may not be the best choice, but there are other plastics that may work better with less deflection and a better wearing surface. Several manufacturer's use phenolic plastics for router plate inserts and there are companies online that sell sheets in a variety of sizes and thicknesses so it should be possible to make your own. I considered making ...


3

Permanent mount? Route it in, get as obsessive as you want on the depth adjustment and epoxy it in place. You can use leveling screws as well, again if permanent , I would apply thread lock on the final stage of alignment to keep secure. I do not recommend "cardboard" shims, it will continue to compress over time. Use sheet metal, foil, etc.


3

UHMW polyethylene sheets. It's the next best thing in providing a durable, smooth surface right after PTFE, but costs only about 1/4 as much. You can usually get it in white (natural color), green, and black. I like green which gives the table a very nice appearance (I'd abstain from using black in fear of it possibly staining wood, although UHMW-PE is quite ...


3

It's more time efficient, but is it more dangerous? I think as long as any guards are in place and normal safety procedures are followed as mindfully as they should always be followed there's little increased danger. That's not to say there's none, and individual mileage as always will vary. You list table saws, jointers, router tables and drill presses ...


3

I think a tall fence, with a gap for trim, is the best solution, but I also had great success with the following experiment. I wanted to solve the setup problem of aligning the fence with the flush trim bit so I constructed a single point-of-contact fence instead, that uses the guide bearing on the trim bit as the second contact point: There is a 1/8" ...


3

Properly speaking, you don't need any power tools to build a cabinet. (However, that would be tiresome to say the least.) Yes to the router, no to the router table (unless you commit an entire 4x8 sheet to the table), and an additional "yes" to a circular saw with a home-made cutting guide. This picture from woodmagazine.com: They specify 1/2" stock for ...


3

For dados in larger boards, a router guided by a straight edge clamped square to the board can be easier than a router table. There are a number of good jig designs, depending on how often you're going to cut the same dado, how much alignment you want the jig to do automagically, and so on.


3

I would like to use my router table as a jointer since I can not afford the cost of a jointer itself. What modifications would I need to do to the router fence (maybe?) to make it work the best. For jointing purposes, the main feature you need in your router table fence is independent setting for each side of the fence. The left side of the fence must be ...


3

It's preferable to use both. The fence, lined up with the bearing, protects against the workpiece slipping up and over the bearing, and provides a place to mount featherboards to help keep the workpiece flat against the table.


3

You could use some 3/8" lexan, which you can usually get from the Home Store. I would recommend some solid surface(ie. Corian, etc.) if you can get your hands on a piece. It can be machined using normal woodworking tools, and is very stable, and has a smooth finish that is great for durability and sliding parts across easily.


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