8

One way to combat this is to glue multiple layers that have been steamed over a form. Essentially, you'll be making a custom piece of curved plywood. The internal stresses will keep the workpiece from deforming back to its original shape. Tage Frid has an excellent book on shaping, veneering, and finishing that covers this topic in depth. (I have no ...


5

I built a much smaller plywood steam box a while back using that same Karcher unit. I used it to bend oak, ash, pine and small branches, mostly very well, after steaming them for about 20 minutes each. (See oak test below). I was using 5-6mm strips about 400mm long. I'm guessing you're working with thicker stock? In this case you'll probably need to leave ...


5

How seamless does this need to be? Cuts along the wood's grain can often be glued back together almost undetectably, if you're careful. Bent lamination could be done, but the connection to face and back would not be seamless -- grain wouldn't match. There would also be a grain mismatch seam where the laminate ends meet, unless you are careful and/or lucky, ...


4

According to the US Forest Products Laboratory in this 1957 Publication softwoods do not in general work as well as hardwoods in bending applications. Indeed, USFPL cites yew and Alaskan yellow cedar as exceptions. Other species of softwoods (Douglas-fir, southern yellow pine, northern and Atlantic white-cedar, and redwood) are perfectly good for bending, ...


3

Thanks for the drawing, I wouldn't have understood what you were hoping to do without it. It's too thick to bend. (Isn't it? I've never tried steam bending before but remember I'm a homegamer) It's not too thick to bend, but there are some it depends. Species matters, how the wood was originally dried matters, but the main thing is the orientation of ...


2

"Effectively"? No. Theoretically it is possible to bend a piece of wood that has finish on it. However I seriously doubt that the finish would come through the process in an acceptable state. Typically you bend wood by immersing it in a steam bath to both saturate the fibers with water and heat the wood. I don't think a typical poly finish would survive ...


2

That's a pretty substantial bend. Steambending is probably not an option, especially if the wood has been kiln dried. Doing a glue-up is theoretically strong enough, but a lot depends on stock preparation. If I did this, I'd want some mechanical assistance in there (screws, dowels, biscuits...), as it's a pretty substantial bend. Buying new is certainly ...


1

What is ‘best’? Straightness and freedom from knots have already been mentioned. Equally, if not more important is the speed of growth of the wood. The faster it is grown, the greater the proportion of summer growth to winter growth. It is the summer growth that is strong and that will put up with being bent, while the winter growth is relatively weak. Wood ...


1

I think the best way would be to make multiple of those "donuts" out of a thicker plywood, and use them as bulkheads down the length of the pipe. Run stringers to link them together, then bend a thinner plywood around and either glue, nail, screw or a combination to the bulkheads. Or, if you think you can pull it off, figure out how many 1x4's it will take ...


1

Flexible plywood can be used for this. It typically has a bend radius of about 12", so your 3' diameter should be fine. Do note that flexible plywood is usually pretty thin, so to get the 3" wall thickness you'd need two layers of plywood with some solid wood spacers between them. You would need some kind of form to bend the plywood and to construct the ...


1

A bit of this depends on how the drawer body is built, but I'd think about reducing the height of the back of the drawer to whatever the available space is... The downside is that the front might tilt forward and not sit nicely flush. And while it won't cost much to try, I doubt that time in clamps with a modest sized additional support (as suggested in ...


1

I did a bunch of research but I can't say that you can. Usually with a twisted board you can only joint it flat or cut out what would be useful. I found a question very related to what you asked. The link is below. How to straighten a warped board


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