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4

It really depends on the level of detail you want the wood to hold. My first response would be pine/fir/spruce. Most 2" x 4" material is pine, sometimes fir or spruce. It is cheap and all are 'softwoods'. These tend to be the woods often used to make toy cars. There are lots of level of quality when talking about wood cars. So if you want toys, the ...


4

They are part numbers from Cherry Tree. When you go to their search page notice that each item has a part number showing in plain black text. Most of the numbers look kind of like they come from a master list of catalog parts, but some are real simple like 1, 3 or 324. I did a search for "peg" and found part 1, a "multi use peg" on page 9; part 3, "wood ...


4

One method for reproducing complex curves is to mill the surfaces of the block flat and parallel, and then use a drill press to drill a series of holes to measured depths. You can then start removing stock by any means: band saw, hand planes, sanding, etc. until you've just barely removed the evidence of the holes. Another possibility is to create a series ...


3

There are CNC router bits as small as 1/32" (0.79mm) that would perform such tasks as this toy block. For obvious reasons, the feed rates have to be carefully managed. A skilled operator might create the design for a larger bit to take out the open areas, then perform final passes with the detail bit. If one looks closely at the edge of the cut, it appears ...


3

I am trying to visualize what you are building, but this really sounds like a job for wood glue and some tack brads. If you're concerned about it working loose over time, you might be able to lay the ramp in a rabbet to increase the glue surface. One thing to keep in mind is that if you've precalculated your miters, adding the rabbets would change the ...


2

All the answers so far assume you're looking for a power tool method (and you probably are), however, since you indicate that you're working in softwood, you may want to consider a couple of carving knives and a few evenings on the front porch. Your first couple might have a few rough spots, but I'm told you can get the hang of it reasonably quickly, ...


2

This shouldn't take days with hand tools. This is how I would approach it. For the convex side (bottom side) of the curved rockers, roughly cut the shape with a hand saw (or use the table saw if you prefer). Make a few straight cuts outside the eventual curve, so you will end up with maybe 4 or 5 straight line sections. For the concave side (top side), cut ...


2

Bent lamination would work well for making the rockers with the tools you have available. You can cut the thin strips on your table saw then glue and clamp them in a simple jig. If you are constructing them from plywood, such as one method with the silhouette cut from a single sheet or you need to cut curves for other parts, a jig saw is a good choice and ...


2

Hardwoods are easy to work with and most durable for play - Oak and Maple are very commonly used for puzzles and block toys. Pine (or hemlock, fir, etc) - standard big box lumber also would work but since it is softer it would not be as durable. Painting any of these woods is straightforward, just follow the paint directions - many standard paints sold in ...


1

Another possibility is that the work was not done by a router approach, or at least not all of it. A possiblity is that the circle and larger corner walls were done using a router with a largish bit, say the inner diameter of the corner pieces. Then the central letter and the inner corner details were cut from a matching thin sheet using a fret saw and then ...


1

Similar work is normally done on a pin router. In the most common arrangement a router table is fitted with a guide arm that aligns a pin with the blade, similar to a turntable. The pin is captured in a template and the work moved around to duplicate the design. A web search should illustrate a plethora of home made and industrial versions. In a similar ...


1

Is it possible to reconsider whether you must start with a solid block of wood? For much of boatbuilding history, half-hull models were used which were made out of horizontal slices or sections (called 'waterlines'). Each section could then be cut to the appropriate shape, and then 'faired' to a smooth hull surface.


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A saw. hoof file for the horse, Or rasp. file, drill bit home made, bit handle, spoke shave, knife, mall home made,[type of hammer] chisle's, These would all be common tools to have. All would work on soft wood.


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Based on the woods listed in the Comments: Rosewood would be a great choice in terms of durability. Potential for toxicity is a concern but anyway "rosewood" doesn't mean much these days. Much wood sold as rosewood is either of a lesser species of dalbergia or something that looks (a little) like rosewood but is actually a completely unrelated species. So I ...


1

Personally, I think your best bet is to get CAD files and use a CNC machine. First this would make it a lot easier to replicate the work and it can be done in relatively short order. If you can't/don't want to buy one (understandable, I don't have one nor likely to either) there are different places that you can rent/pay to use them. I think some Maker ...


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