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12

Another solution you did not list would be to go ahead and build the shelf to be square itself, then shim underneath it to level out the floor. That way you can move it anytime but also make it look straight against the wall.


11

Plywood is designed specifically to resist warping and to be stronger than solid wood of the same dimensions due to the properties of lamination. The plywood you want will be labeled as being for "outdoor use," which is treated to be rot resistant. It is easily worked and paintable/sandable. If you want to leave wood exposed rather than painting, then you ...


10

The apron on a four legged table serves a number of functions, and you may not have considered them all. The apron: stiffens the top, helping to keep it flat transfers the load to the legs connects the legs to each other and keeps them vertical connects the top to the base (i.e. legs + apron) in a large table, supports stretchers that support the top in the ...


10

The strength of wood is established for various species based upon the actual cross section area of material. Industry standards set over 50 years ago established the actual dimensions of a nominal 2x? boards at 1.5" wide. The depth of 2x4 and 2x6 were set 1/2" less than nominal dimension and large depths at -3/4" from nominal. Structural engineering tables ...


9

By to look of the "keyhole" shaped holes in the back of the knobs, you're probably supposed to slide them onto the head of a screw that's attached to the wall. Here's the keyhole in glorious ASCIIart, with labels, to make this easier to explain: +--+ | | <------ thin end | | _-' '-_ / \ | | <---- ...


9

You could try Lincoln Log™ style A nice DIY write up at Lumberjocks At least they are still made of wood. You could use round magnets like those found here. You'd want to make the hole with a Forstner bit, and hold them in with epoxy. I'd suggest keeping the magnets away from each other until the epoxy has completely set to ensure they don't pull each ...


8

If you're looking for weather-resistant and lightweight, you can't do much better than cedar for the wood choice. Cedar also has a good strength-to-weight ratio, making it very sturdy. For thickness, using 2x material (i.e., 2x4, 2x6, 2x8, etc.) is probably ok given your letter sizes. Bear in mind that cedar usually has somewhat of a premium in price over ...


8

I can't tell from this picture exactly but it is worth pointing out that this frame might not all be made of wood and wood elements (not that you were suggesting this). The items you see in section B and C could very well be made from clay/plastic molds and then glued into place. It is possible that one of these pieces of flair to be carved by hand, to ...


8

and would like to know the key design considerations and recommended jointing options for such a project Unfortunately there isn't any easy answer to this. As with many woodworkers when I was designing my own workbench I immersed myself in the topic and spent months collecting images, step-by-step build articles, reading and analysing (over-analysing) ...


8

I would build the support frame for under the boxes, just the frame (out of treated 2x4's). Then find your where you want the boxes to rest. Then you scribe your 2x4's with a compass. You get your frame some what level, then set the compass (generally to the max gap, but only if you want the whole frame resting on the ground) and go around with the ...


7

B: I would like to know how elements like what is highlighted in B could be made. I'm sure this could be hand carved but I don't think this was hand-carved. As you mentioned, this could have been hand-made but it was probably mass-produced. Decorative elements such as the one you labeled B are commonly called appliques or onlays. They can be wood, but are ...


7

What would be a suitable material, in terms of durability and cost, for a children's desk? For a piece of furniture that's destined for the lifetime of abuses that children can inflict upon it, I view it from two different schools of thought. The first school says that since you expect the piece to be beaten up, painted, and generally neglected, you will ...


7

When making butt joints for corners... structurally is there any difference between longer tops and longer sides [using biscuits and glue] Yes, with longer sides it would be stronger. The reasons being: for the glue line to be broken it has to shear through at 0°, versus being pulled apart at 90° which is much easier (although it must be stated, still ...


7

This doesn't make a lot of sense in my situation, because one third of 60mm is 20mm and 5 times that is 100mm, which is longer then the beam width. I think it's important to remember that these, as in all similar general guidelines about how to size a joint, are just rules of thumb and no rule of thumb needs to be followed slavishly. That's what makes it a ...


7

I suspect that the middle is sagging because it is not adequately braced. Most of the folding tables that my parents own (that we use for family reunions as eating tables) are similar to the one below. You will see a diagonal brace that runs towards the middle of the table to help with sag. (source) Now, you still wouldn't want to sit in the middle of ...


7

In terms of compression strength, I wouldn't want to park a big car on top of it - but even a couple of drunken teenagers jumping up and down should be fine. As others have commented, racking side-to-side might have been a concern if you didn't have walls either side. That could easily be addressed by attaching a plywood skin to the back (but it doesn't ...


6

Bamboo in general Bamboo, like any woody material, does respond to changes in humidity and its dimensions do change as a result. This expansion and contraction, like with wood, takes place primary across the grain. "Engineered bamboo" This could be one of a number of things. If the bamboo product is just a simple glue-up (like a "butcher block" ...


6

This would very much depend on the quality of your plywood which sounds questionable. You also don't mention the thickness which would play a role here as well. The overall dimensions of the project are not shown either. This is a dollhouse after all so I can't imagine its size would be a huge factor. For screwing onto the base: That should be fine. If you ...


6

The retracting control console may be a lot simpler than it looks. For example, you could simply route some diagonal grooves in the sides and insert (stainless steel) dowels into the side edges of the console top, near the rear. The dowels follow the diagonal grooves in the sides, so when you pull out the console, the controls are raised and when you push ...


6

Are there any other hardware options besides two rods bolted to the wood top and wood base? There are many types of bolts that might suit a project like this, depending on the exact design you arrive at. Have a look on BoltDepot for a pretty comprehensive overview of what's available. In theory the entire table could be made from wood, using a hardwood ...


6

The other answers are helpful for explaining what types of wood to use for the environment but fail to take into consideration how you are going to construct the letters. The simplest way I can think of would be trace the outlines of the letters onto plywood sheets and cut them out with a jig saw. If you use non-engineered boards of wood, either dimension ...


6

What are the functional differences between a leg and front vise? I think you've already hit on them pretty well in your Question. Leg vise can be built from solely wood components and has a deep throat. It also is the largest of all bench vises from what I can tell. A "con" could be that a traditional leg vise relies on a parallel bar at the foot. ...


6

I would try to keep the geometry of the tenons as simple as possible. The important thing is to maximize the contact surface between the side grain surfaces in the glued joint. Since your making a cabinet base you need not totally conceal the connection (I assume you have a top counter surface over the base). Each tenon is half the height of the beam ...


5

Let me answer your questions in reverse order: Are we in over our heads?! No, you're not in over your heads. You can do this. Do you see anything wrong with my initial draft? At a glance only a few things concern me. How will you move this to where it needs to be once it's built, and will it ever need to be moved again? You may want the table to break ...


5

I know that the glue is stronger than the wood; Just to clarify something on this point, while this is widely said it's a little misleading. A well-made glue joint is stronger than the wood itself, but not actually the glue itself. It's important to make the distinction because even unconsciously believing the glue is inherently strong can lead to an "it'...


5

Heptagons are not constructible polygons, so you will need to use a protractor and make an indexing jig. It's not clear what final diameter your setup requires, but for small work it might be best to keep the extreme ends of the dowel circular, so they can be mounted in a chuck - from there, you would have a router move on a linear slide to shape each of ...


5

The only consistent advice I find is keep dovetail length about equal to board thickness. And keep dovetail ratios between 1:6 and 1:8. It's worth mentioning that some of this is a tradition thing and to some extent that is based on aesthetics; you do see exceptions for specific decorative effect. Dovetails are inherently strong, both structurally and ...


5

Is spruce wood a good choice ? Or maybe I should choose a stronger one ? Wood species Spruce is one of the strongest woods in the world for its weight. Beds of a similar design to yours have been made from other softwoods, including pine and fir, which are not nearly as strong, so I think spruce is a fine choice and you're lucky you have a source of it. ...


5

That design will have problems with racking forces (based on what I can see from the point of view you show1). If I stand at the end of the table and push wilh a little force the legs would probably break from the table top. Table have aprons and/or stretchers to help mitigate this. You need something to brace the legs. Take a look at this shaker style ...


5

12" deep shelves are to deep for most books, again most books. I would make the bookshelf a "breakfront", the 2 lower shelves 12" deep above a 4" base or toespace, and step the front back at the 30-32" height and make the remaining shelves, 8, maybe 10" deep.


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