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11

@bowlturner gives a good suggestion, but with pinewood derby cars (I'm assuming?) it's going to be really hard to get a dowel to sit well since the slot is at the edge of the wood. I'd probably dado a larger groove where the nail slot is (maybe 1/4 in deep and 1/4 in wide) and cut a piece of wood that size and glue it in. You could try wood filler, but I've ...


9

In this case I would tend to use a dowel, drill a bigger hole that matches the dowel and glue the dowel in, then recut or drill a hole for the axle. If it is a long cut, then you could try a small 'wedge' to do the same thing.


6

For drilling single holes in the middle of a piece of wood you can use a drill bushing to keep the bit perpendicular to the piece. I use this from Big Gator Tools. You can also use your drill press to drill a bushing hole through a thicker board (about 1-1 1/2" works well). If you go this route, you can make the bushing for any angle you need, and place ...


6

You could drill as deep as the hole saw allows, then use a chisel to remove the "plug" left behind. Then drill again with the hole saw. One thing I would highly recommend anytime drilling using a hole saw is to give the chips a place to go. In this scenario I would drill a smaller hole using a spade/forstener bit inside the hole but overlapping with where ...


5

You have two things happening here. First is loose pocket hole plugs. Second is tear-out of the veneer face of the plywood. For the problem of loose pocket hole plugs, you will want to make sure you are drilling straight and not moving side to side as you drill, accidentally widening the hole. For the most part, the jig prevents this, so I'm not really sure ...


5

You're looking for a round nose bit, like the one pictured below. It also looks like the edges of the hole are rounded over, for which you'd also use a roundover bit. You could also take care of rounding the edges with sandpaper or a file/rasp.


5

Is there anyway to accomplish this with the drill press I currently own? As far as I can see, no. If not, are there alternatives to a drill press that can be used for accurate holes? Yes. You can actually drill very accurate holes (accurate in all senses: position, diameter and squareness to the surface). Note that for accurate positioning marking out ...


5

There are generally speaking two ways people go about this kind of work these days, using a router or jigsaw. Router With the router you'd use a suitable straight-cutting bit with a bearing guide in conjunction with a template made from thinner material, running the bearing carefully around the inside perimeter of the template while being careful to avoid ...


5

When drilling screw holes for acrylic should I make it slightly larger than the actual diameter of the screw hole so that it does not crack? Very much yes. You're not drilling pilot holes here, you're drilling clearance holes which are completely different. See more in this previous Answer. Depth of the screw hole for the birch plywood. Would 3/4" ...


4

When drilling screw holes for acrylic should I make it slightly larger than the actual diameter of the screw hole so that it does not crack? If you're planning to have the screws thread into the acrylic, I would make them slightly undersize and then tap the acrylic. If the screws just pass through the acrylic (and are threaded into something else), then ...


4

I would say I am at best, hobby level. But when I had to do something like this in the past, I would use the drill press to drill holes into a template piece of wood. Something thin enough to not get in the way but thick enough to hold it's form. Then chalk line the end MDF, place the template in the right spot. Clamp everything down really well. Use a ...


4

I have used forstner bits where the the center spurs are removable for (presumably) just this sort of job. See http://www.finewoodworking.com/tool-guide/product-finder/mlcs-forstner-bits.aspx and http://www.fine-tools.com/staketen-bormax.html I would start the hole with the spur in place, and then remove it once the hole is established. You will ...


4

This blog/ad mentions two wood filler products, one of which can be sanded/trimmed. It's outrageously expensive, but it was the only one I could find. Try adding "polyamide" to your search, as I believe that's the material glue-stick wood filler is usually made from. You might also be able to buy PUR (heat-activated polyurethane hot melt) intended for this ...


4

What is the technical term for the hole made in this soap holder. I'm not sure there is a specific term other than to say it's been hollowed. I cannot figure out how it was done to make it evenly curved There are a number of ways this can be done today. Excluding fully automated methods (CNC) I think there are three main hand-operated possibilities. In ...


3

I have a small project during which I drill hundreds of little holes Sounds like a cribbage board, but you don't say for sure. In any case, you do mention that having finish inside the holes isn't strictly necessary. I'd like to add that getting total, complete coverage of finish in every nook and cranny of a piece is not entirely necessary. Take a look ...


3

As a general statement, your idea will work - though precision will be dependent on the quality of a) your drill press, b) the bits used, and c) the 'solidity' of your clamped jig, as well as being limited to higher tolerances by the nature of this approach. IF the drill press has little to no play when extended, it will be better suited than a drill press ...


3

If the hole is big enough to fit a bowl gauge in it (for instance, if you're making a cup), you can get a perfectly centered hole by mounting the cylinder to a lathe and turning it like you would turn a bowl.


3

The other option that no one has mentioned is to use a plunge router to "drill" the hole. Because the base of the router is supported by the material, you have high assurances that the hole will be routed perfectly perpendicular to the surface. Using a guide will also allow you to accurately position the holes and make repeated plunges. If needed, the ...


3

I am trying to minimise screws showing. The approach shown by the red screws in your diagram will be visible even if you counterbore and plug. Furniture block joint An alternative is to use battens on the insides of the corners and use screws from the inside. Or just glue it if you have (or can buy/borrow) a couple of clamps. This is the sort of joint you ...


3

The other answers seem to have covered your main questions, but there's something you may not have considered - if the boards are to be cut by CNC router then you will not get sharp internal corners (e.g. 90° degree cuts), instead these will have a small fillet (radius between corners) due to the way the router works. The radius of the fillet will be the ...


3

Hole saw may not be the best tool for the task. A Forstner bit or something of that sort might be more appropriate. Even a spade bit might be a good choice depending on the material and the diameter of the hole.


3

One trick that will go (in this case) up to 5" is to drill as far as you can from one side, Drill a hole using the guide hole all the way through the wood, and then flip the board over using the guide hole to align the new cut from the opposite direction. they should meet up.


2

Three other options come to mind, none are perfect although # 3 is not bad. Toolmonger.com has very deep hole saw bits. (http://toolmonger.com/2009/08/14/extra-deep-hole-saw/) But damn, these babies are pricey and you may need a drill with horsepower! And good luck getting the wood block out of the drill if it wedges. You could cut the hole using multiple ...


2

I don't see any reason this wouldn't work as long as the loads on the shelf are reasonable (both the total weight and the placement of any heavy individual items). The OSB is going to be quite strong at 18mm and the portion of the cables running under the shelf will act very much like a conventional shelf support, albeit very narrow ones. The weak point in ...


2

Caulk would work well. Anything will work - acrylic, painters, silicone, whatever you have on hand. You can caulk from the outside or from the inside of the enclosure. Your suggestion for duct tape will also work, but will be more prone to deteriorating over time due to the dusty environment. You can also make small wooden splinters to fit in the gaps and ...


2

First you need a drill. This can be a hand drill like this or an electric drill. Then you need suitable drill bit. There are a few different types for different materials and hole sizes: Twist drills: This is really the "standard" drill bit which most people will think of first. They can be used on a bunch of different materials (generally metal, wood, ...


2

Do you have a lathe available? If so, here's my answer from a (similar question) If you have a lathe available (you did mention the spindle being turned already), then you have a great way to drill a hole along the center axis. You use a drill chuck (like this one at Rockler), to hold your drill bit. You chuck the spindle, rotate and move the ...


2

A CNC is definitely overkill here. You can use a drill or drill press to remove the bulk of waste, then use chisels to square up the hole and clean up the corners. Then use the chisel to score and pare away the little lip. That said, with chipboard you may have some difficulty, so I would suggest just cutting out a section slightly larger than the area ...


1

For a professional result I would suggest using two tools, a handheld drill and a handheld jigsaw. First draw a rectangle with a marking pencil the size and shape of the USB port cage. Wear safety goggles! Second use the drill with a bit with a diameter slightly wider than the width of the jigsaw blade and smaller than the USB port cage. Drill a hole at ...


1

If there is only ONE workpiece: If you only need to center drill one cylinder, then mark the center, and drill it. How to find the center of a circle If there are multiple workpieces: Yes, your idea will work roughly, however you would be much better off using a v-block to hold the workpieces. The reason for this is that any circular fixture you make ...


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