Hot answers tagged

11

I've never worked with it before, and was wondering if it would be a wood that could be worked by hand? Yes, absolutely. Black walnut isn't really all that hard of a wood, comparatively. Looking at Janka hardness testing, black walnut is about 1010 pound-force. By comparison, basswood is about 410 and purpleheart is 1860. I would consider purpleheart ...


9

Lamination FTW If the chair were a different type I'd have suggested solid wood (note: grain must go horizontally), but not for one like this. Laminating up a curved plywood back is the way to go here IMO as already suggested in @keshlam's Answer. Only one potential problem with this plan, and that is getting the thick veneers to do the lamination or cutting ...


8

This is actually a pretty broad topic, but other than marketing decided price (brand A being more expensive than brand B simply because of the brand name) there may be large difference in manufacturing of the chisels that can affect price. I'll address general woodworking chisels, but I suspect that the same applies to the various carving chisels (as well ...


8

Hand tools No real surprise here, carving chisels are the main tools used to carve wood if you're doing it with hand tools. But knives of various kinds are also used by some carvers (and used exclusively by some for whittling and chip carving). As with bench chisels it's usually a good idea for the beginner to buy a set and build from there, instead of ...


7

Wow, that is a wonderful piece of art! I assume that this will be displayed inside in which case the 'elements' will consist of temperature, dust, handling, and light. Temperature-wise the piece will do well in a residential setting, especially if the space is air conditioned (more consistent temperature and humidity which can affect the wood and could ...


5

If the back is curved, I would suggest laminating layers of bending plywood over a form to get that curve, then trim to the oval shape with bandsaw/saber saw/handsaw, a trifle oversize, then file/rasp/sand to final shape and size.


5

But now I want to give it that deep rich color and bring out the wonderful smell of cedar. Any finish or treatment (e.g. mineral oil) you apply will actually have the tendency to lessen the smell, AFAIK nothing will enhance it. Traditionally the cedar linings of chest and cupboards was left unfinished for precisely this reason. And from what I've read you ...


4

It really depends on the level of detail you want the wood to hold. My first response would be pine/fir/spruce. Most 2" x 4" material is pine, sometimes fir or spruce. It is cheap and all are 'softwoods'. These tend to be the woods often used to make toy cars. There are lots of level of quality when talking about wood cars. So if you want toys, the ...


4

First real attempt at using sketchup as I would have a hell of a time explaining this otherwise. Magnets for this type of this are everywhere but like you said you have a ceramic knife. When I found out you were only thinking about 2 knives something like this came to mind. Blades would enter from each side. Would obviously have to have width a little ...


4

I think the answer to this question comes in several parts. I've turned several kinds of wood and have done some amount of wood burning in my younger days. I can't directly speak about pyrography in particular (fun as it sounds) but I am familiar with 'torching' or 'scorching' for certain effect. I enjoy turning and carving in poplar, cherry and other clear,...


4

I hand-carved my first Kuksa a month ago from half an ash log. There's your problem. Kuksa's are best made from a close-grained wood (traditionally birch burl). Ash, being open-grained, is very subject to seepage like you described. I would like to add that I haven't got this issue with a well-dried beech bowl. This makes sense since beech is close-...


4

With handtools you typically want to follow a "coarse, medium, fine" workflow. The coarse step will get generally close to the line, medium will refine that to hit the line, and fine will fine-tune and surface your piece. It sounds like you're trying to skip the coarse step and go straight to medium. Your coarse work should be done by either a saw or ...


3

Paul Sellers has a video on making a Poor Man's Router Plane using a chisel and a block of wood. Depending on the depth of the box, this method may work for you. NOTE: I take no responsibility for sending you down the Paul Sellers video rabbit hole. :)


3

There are CNC router bits as small as 1/32" (0.79mm) that would perform such tasks as this toy block. For obvious reasons, the feed rates have to be carefully managed. A skilled operator might create the design for a larger bit to take out the open areas, then perform final passes with the detail bit. If one looks closely at the edge of the cut, it appears ...


3

Depending on how deep the cup/bowl will be you may be able to carve it out with a large gouge, hook knife, or scorp. I would also look into power carving options, such as a burr on a Foredom-style tool, or the arbortech "mini turbo" or "turbo shaft". With any of these options, though, I think you'd still want to hog out as much waste as possible with a ...


3

I'm going to expand somewhat on my Comment above. Hide it I don't think you're would be really happy with any smoothing option here so I strongly recommend you just sidestep the issue and line the box :-) This isn't the cop out it might appear to be, small decorative boxes are commonly lined in various ways (baize, flocking, rouched fabric) and it ...


3

By hand You could do this using a gouge (a type of chisel with a curved cutting edge) but it would require that its edge be very sharp indeed* to get an acceptable surface inside the scoops. In addition to getting the gouge sharp enough initially this will require frequent upkeep of the edge during the job, as often as every few minutes depending on the ...


3

Well from what I can think off hand this might be helpful for you. 1) Thickness of metal, yup. My dad gotten a cheap set for wood carving. The metal was THIN. Less than a 1/8". I would try finding something thicker simply because that thin metal bends so easily. (I am not aware of thicker carving tools simply because I am not into it) 2) Cut/grind. I got ...


3

TL;DR warning. In other areas of woodworking tools I can see why one brand would cost more than another because of quality, manufacturing, and material differences You forgot one other important factor, which is paying for the name. Unfortunately there's a lot of this in woodworking and it extends through all levels of tools (both power and hand). You ...


3

My guess is that drumsticks are not carved, but rather are turned. I can't imagine you'll get the feel you want from carving, especially with a single ordinary blade that was never designed for carving. That's not to say you can carve with a plain pocket knife, but rather that the skill required to do so takes a long time to learn, and may only be ...


2

If you are just starting, your main problem is not going to be tool quality, it is going to be getting the right tool for the job. For example, one old book recommended the following as a set of basic shapes: This obviously does not include v-notches, punches, picks and other essential utility shapes. Altogether a complete set of shapes might include 60 ...


2

You can create the outer shape by making a template for the back, cutting the workpiece to rough shape with the saw of your choice (probably bandsaw or jigsaw if using power tools), and using a router with a pattern bit or guide bushing. You can either make the template for the entire back, or slightly more than half of the back (since the left and right ...


2

If I'm visualising this correctly you're fine, on paper at least, as you'll have long grain running down through the thin strip that remains outside of the hole. But branch wood isn't that predictable and also you say the wood is spalted, which adds some additional uncertainty. I'm afraid this is one of those try it and see propositions.


2

If you want to create this with the tools you mentioned you'll need a "core box" bit. This is a plunging router bit with a spherical profile. To determine the size we'll need to determine the radius using the formula: r = h/2 + w^2/8h Plugging in h = 1/2 and w = 1 3/4 we get an answer of 1 1/64". Since core box bits are typically sold by diameter you'll ...


2

A suggestion of perhaps the wrong tool but a good result nonetheless. A milling machine uses end mills for removing material both from the sides and bottom of a work piece. It is a very bad idea to use an end mill in a drill press to remove material from the sides of a work piece, but not as bad to use an end mill in a drill press to remove material from the ...


2

This may be a stupidly obvious answer, but get a good, solid pocket knife, and just start carving wood with it. Whittling is one of the lowest barrier-to-entry hobbies there is. Making something (anything) will teach you enough to pick out your next project, and you can expand your tools from there to match your purpose. If you must buy a tool, Narex makes ...


2

I have not used a grinder for shaping wood as deeply as your project may require, but have free-form shaped concave surfaces using a disc grinder air tool. My suggestions include: If the leg is straight along its length you might also be able to use a router to block out the cross section profile. Make certain that the leg is securely anchored before ...


2

There is no way I would use 37mm teak for the unseen back panel of piece of furniture. Personally, I would use plywood or hardboard; certainly 6mm solid wood would be fine (and for the kitchen cupboards in particular, I would consider using a cheaper wood than teak). Your carpenters seem to be grossly over-building the furniture. I wouldn't use more than ...


2

While I would just chuck the thing and buy a new toilet seat, you seem to be attached to it so... I'd suggest a non-woodworking solution: Find a maker space type of location near you and see if someone will help you recreate the part on a 3D printer. Offering some cash for their time and material may go a long way toward motivating a helper. As a woodworking ...


1

Another possibility is that the work was not done by a router approach, or at least not all of it. A possiblity is that the circle and larger corner walls were done using a router with a largish bit, say the inner diameter of the corner pieces. Then the central letter and the inner corner details were cut from a matching thin sheet using a fret saw and then ...


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