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24

Is working MDF bad for your health? Yes but only if you are ignorant of your tools and materials. It certainly can be. However the answer of "Yes" is misleading as the concerns surrounding MDF are more than just the potential presence of hazards such as the release formaldehyde. Working MDF creates dust particles much like any other wood. It is true ...


19

If you call up Freud and ask, they'll tell you that you want one full tooth to clear the top of the wood, but no more. There are a couple of reasons for that recommendation- first is safety. A tooth that clears the surface on the up swing then re-enters on the down swing may not follow the same planar path due to harmonics and vibration related physics. A ...


13

Generally, that is the right thing to do. Obviously you wouldn't let a power tool run all day when you don't need it, or even walk away and let it run unattended. But keeping it running in between making several cuts in a couple of work pieces or drilling several holes is absolutely fine (I am almost inclined to say "best practice"). For the tool as well ...


12

For cuts with a router, slow also can mean burnt material. If I have a complex profile to cut, I either break it into multiple passes with multiple bits, or I sneak up on it, going slightly deeper each pass. Some folks also make a deep pass at close to the final depth, then make another shallow, fast pass at final depth to finish up the cut. e.g.


11

I presume it's obvious but I'll say it anyway, accurate layout and marking on the wood is an all-important first step. I have used my jigsaw or chisel for similar cuts on other projects. While I wasn't aiming for high precision on those projects, it seems too sloppy to achieve the precision for cabinetry. I wouldn't myself do these kinds of cuts using a ...


10

Always make sure your bits are sharp and take small bites with the router. If the router bit travels too slowly, it can burn and/or burnish your workpiece. Heat from taking too large a bite or moving slowly can also destroy the temper on the router bit, causing it to dull faster and/or break. Carbide bits are more resistant to heat than high-speed steel ...


10

The common argument for raising the blade is that the front of the blade is making a more downward cut, theoretically reducing the chance of kickback and increasing cut quality. While this may produce a better-quality cut in plywood, the kickback argument relies on flawed logic, since kickback is often produced by the kerf pinching the back of the blade or ...


10

I am hesitant about the best way of cutting the blocks in half as cleanly as possible and without removing too much material. Let me present a slightly different tack here. Looking at the first link you posted, it looks very much like the blocks are an exact fit on the tubes: This is actually pretty simple to achieve. First, cut two blocks that are each ...


10

Regarding C1, C2, ... C6 carbide grades, higher numbers mean harder, but at the same time more brittle. C1 carbide cuts softer metals like aluminum and C6 carbide cuts hardest metals like steel. What is important for woodworking is that the carbide grade doesn't make much difference when cutting wood, if any. I tend to prefer lower carbide grades, because ...


10

As a DIYer, there's no compelling reason for you to go out shopping for a 14" table saw. That said, if you're asking because there happens to be a 14" table saw available to you for an irresistible price, there's nothing inherently wrong with it, but there are some things to be aware of: If you're in the US, you won't be able to get 5 hp out of a ...


9

First of all, most jigsaw blades can easily cut 1 3/4". A regular 4" blade will usually have a cutting capacity of 3", which is more than enough. Naturally you should go slow, letting the saw do the work instead of pushing it hard. Secondly, since you are planning on using the wooden circle as a wheel powered by a motor, you can actually get away with an ...


9

You need a guide board. Figure out the distance from the edge of the circular saw blade to the edge of the plate, preferably not the side that the motor hangs over, or your board will have to be very thin to fit underneath it. Clamp the board (make sure it's a straight one!) to the work piece parallel to the cut line, at the distance you measured on your ...


9

I set the blade to the minimum height that is required to make the cut, typically about 1/8" above. There isn't really a need to have it higher for purposes of clearing the sawdust. If you look at the geometry of a table saw blade, the cutting action is happening at the front of the blade, as the cutters push through the wood. The gullets will fill on ...


8

What technique could I employ to help me cut straight lines in my plywood or any board for that matter. I can't recommend any technique for cutting straight lines freehand on a table saw because you should not do that. You should always use the fence to guide rip cuts and the miter gauge or a sled for crosscuts. It's a safety issue: if the work happens to ...


8

I don't know how "pretty" it needs to be when its done but rough cuts can easily be done with a chainsaw or a reciprocating saw with a long enough blade. A quick search shows blades that are 10" long which might be enough for the reciprocating saw. A 12" pruning blade like this bad boy from Amazon for example. Might not be the best example but as long as ...


8

It would interesting to see a picture of the board to help diagnose what the problem is. However, like Graphus said it is very unlikely that the boards have been properly dried after only three months without using a kiln, especially if it was stacked indoors. Most wood properly stacked and stickered will take at least a year to air dry. Moisture meters ...


8

Drill 2 holes (brace and bit if you're being serious about "hand" tools) with a forstner bit (or hole saw), then connect them with a cut using a coping (or jig) saw. Chisel/file/sand as needed. To expand a little... in order to help with tearout, drill from both sides by marking centers on each side and drilling halfway through each. Those look like 1" to 1-...


8

Intuitively, yes, this would be the case, but the question you are asking is potentially putting the cart before the horse. One generally would not choose tooth count based on how long they want the blade to last. Tooth count is primarily a function of the type of cut and the material you are cutting. As discussed in What is the difference between a rip-...


7

Warning I don't think it necessary but there are several links in this answer that are directly related to the horror movie Hellraiser. If you have issues with that type of content don't click on the links. So it looks like what you are trying to make is a variation of the Movable Star Lament Configuration. I cannot seem to find any plans to reference or ...


7

Measure, mark, place fence, measure again before you cut. E.g. stick your circular saw on the piece like you're about to start, mark the blade position, check with a tape measure before pulling the trigger and adjust fence to correct. Check again after adjusting. With just a circular saw for cuts like that measure distance from edge of blade (remember, ...


7

If you're looking for quick and easy, I am currently using CutList Plus (no affiliation) and it does everything you mentioned in your question. I don't want this to sound like too much of a software product review, but it handles storing your supply of lumber (dimensions, cost, types) and then lets you enter all of your parts. Panels can be separately ...


7

With a handsaw, one trick is to score through the veneer with a straightedge and sharp knife. Then use a finely-toothed blade, and let the blade do the work rather than trying to force it into the wood --always good practice, but especially in this situation. You may want to experiment with cutting angles, to cut less perpendicularly to the veneer surface. ...


7

The important thing is to set up a jig or fixture so you can quickly and easily make repeat cuts. You could rig up a fence/guide and sled for your scroll saw and use a very fine blade, but for such small cuts I would make a miter box with a stop block set for the proper length, then gang up a few at a time and cut with a 22 or so TPI hand saw. Because you'...


6

Use a chainsaw or horizontal bandsaw to remove a 2"x8"x10' slice, then cut the ends off that slice, trim to the desired angle, and glue the ends back on. Or go Roy Underhill on that railroad tie and use an axe to rough out the seat and a broad axe to clean it up. Protect yourself from the creosote while working by wearing pants, a long-sleeved shirt, and a ...


6

With the others I recommend to take care if your railroad tie is an actual tie that was treated and not just one cut to size. Now I'm going to recommend the adz, it's an ax like tool that has been used to shape logs for ages. This would allow you to do most of the rough shaping relatively quickly, it will work well with the tie laying on the ground as well....


6

Yes, this is a great way to make such a grid, although you want the joints to be as tight as possible vs. cutting the slots slightly wider than the slats. With a looser fit, the grid will be more prone to racking. If you want to make a cut to exactly the right width in one pass (up to a limit), you can use a dado set (available in either a "wobble" blade or ...


6

Congrats on an excellently done question! In terms of how to cut the board apart I don't think it matters that much, but with an angled cut providing a wider glue surface area that will provide a stronger joint. In the right context I doubt this increased strength will actually matter though, since I assume the sheets will be supported underneath when ...


6

With hand tools only, I suppose the way is to use a coping saw. You drill a small hole inside the waste of the handle, and then pass the coping saw's blade through the hole. This will allow you to remove most of the waste. To round the edge of the hole I would use a chisel for the bulk of the removal, and then sand for a comfortable edge.


6

Drill first and pare with a chisel would be the easiest way to remove the most material faster and you would clean up the inside edge with a paring chisel. Using auger bits that are the exact width of you hole you are trying to make, like those you would see on eyed auger or bits with a brace, you can easily remove waste and not have to worry about going "...


6

I ended up doing the job with a jigsaw and a drill. Jigsaw saws are available in several sizes. One of them went exactly 10cm deep. Of course it would bang into the wood if I would saw the 3 plains. To minimize the banging I drilled 3 holes along the end of those plains. I hope these pictures help to make sense out of this. Keep the jigsaw firm and progress ...


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