6

Find a local cabinet shop or woodworking store that has a wide belt sander. My local hardwood supplier will run panels through their 50" wide sander for just a few bucks. My planer will handle a 13" wide board. If I need a large panel, I'll do the minimal amount of planing possible on the raw boards, then glue them into sub-panels less than 13". Once ...


5

Often in woodworking the best practice is to cut slightly over the final size, then sneak up on the final dimension. One great solution for getting perfect miter joints is to use a miter sled. Once you build the sled, you'll be able to cut square miters every time. Here are some examples: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H00prACPflw http://www....


5

I was taught to measure to the inside (mainly because it was important to fit the frame to the glass, which went on the inside) and to cut via a mitre box to the outside of the line marked, that is is to say, less than half mm proud of the full length. Then take a shooting board and trim with a nice tuned hand plane. In practice, you can skip the mitre box ...


5

Geometric solution Using a large compass or trammel, you can precisely gauge all the distances and transfer them to a large template of whatever material you choose (paper, cardboard, hardboard, plywood, etc.). For each point you need to lay out, you just need at least two reference points and the distance from each reference point to the point you're ...


4

I do some guitar building, and guitars happen to be just wider than standard planers. So, I build a planer sled for my router. Depending on your overall width, this could be useful for you. some pictures of my set up Flat plywood, with 2 square rails. Then I attached my router to a sled of plywood that is reinforced for stability. I was using a 1/2" bit, ...


4

I'd say that CAD is not necessarily your best option. Don't get me wrong. CAD is a great thing and learning any CAD software will be a very handy thing to have up your sleeve. I highly recommend learning any CAD software (no matter how limited or advanced) However, there are a few problems: I have not done woodworking much before Think of CAD software ...


4

Most woodworkers who do CAD-like renderings these days are using SketchUp; the free version is pretty decent and lots of online tutorials exist. This is an observation, not a recommendation.


3

This is a similar table base that I built a few years ago. The joint you trying to replicate is actually a Japanese joint that is most common in much smaller stock and used to make puzzles called “burr” puzzles... Japanese burr puzzle is where you’ll need to start. Burr puzzles are typically built using square stock, and in multiples of 3 creating this ...


3

Simplest answer may be a large sheet of paper (or several firmly secured to each other), fitted precisely to the space. If assembling, use two overlapping pieces, cut away if necessary, to fit the corners. Make sure it's all well secured so nothing can slide out of position, trap it between two large sheets of cardboard for safe travel, and... Or just get ...


3

A variation on the answers above is to make a template like cabinet makers do for counter tops. They will use either strips of 1/4 sheathing/plywood, place them at the perimiter and glue the parts together to make a template. As an alternative , you could get large sheets of poster board, place them to the edges and glue or package tape them together. You ...


3

I have used cabinet scraper in situations like this. Get the wood lined up really well by using cauls to keep the faces in line, and a very sharp scraper to remove the glue lines. Scrapers are great at removing glue and planer marks (wash boarding) on smaller projects, it is labor intensive and the results are great.


2

I'm assuming that for a desk, you do not want the screws to be visible from the work surface. If that is true, then you probably want to use a system like the Kreg pocket hole jig, which actually calculates the length of the screw for you based on the thickness of the material the screw is drilling into. If you are using butt joints (or dado joints) and do ...


2

Although this approach does not necessarily involve software, it can be helpful: prototype your designs by making full-size or scale models using cardboard or XPS foam (the pink or blue 4'x8' sheets of insulation foam sold at home improvement centers). Foam is easy to work with, cheaper than lumber, and you can even prototype complex joinery.


2

I came across a similar design recently. The pictures on that site show (as @Graphus mentioned) that the 3 "legs" are all at right angles to each other.


2

This shouldn't take days with hand tools. This is how I would approach it. For the convex side (bottom side) of the curved rockers, roughly cut the shape with a hand saw (or use the table saw if you prefer). Make a few straight cuts outside the eventual curve, so you will end up with maybe 4 or 5 straight line sections. For the concave side (top side), cut ...


2

Bent lamination would work well for making the rockers with the tools you have available. You can cut the thin strips on your table saw then glue and clamp them in a simple jig. If you are constructing them from plywood, such as one method with the silhouette cut from a single sheet or you need to cut curves for other parts, a jig saw is a good choice and ...


2

You'll probably want to do both. You certainly want to separate out your plywood from your solid wood. With your plywood, you can lay things out down to very fine resolution so you can get exactly what you need out of the sheet. Jay Bates has a nice video detailing his process for this in SketchUp. For your solid wood, you'll want to come up with a total ...


2

I don't know that there is any such software but you could do this old-school. Scale plan and paper Using a scale plan and small pieces of paper cut to size to represent the OSB you can play with various placements of full and half/quarter sheets until you find an arrangement that uses the material as neatly as possible. Probably won't take long once you ...


1

The legs must be perpendicular to each other avoid any 'diamonding'. See: It is only at 90 degrees the intersection will maintain squareness. You can form your caltrop this way: I think to to achieve squareness to each other and shift or 'choke' the intersection closer or further from the middle point you must 'taper' the overall geometry. I believe that ...


1

With the addition of your sketch for the design of your desk several other design considerations besides screw length come to mind. Although this answer does not directly address your question it might be helpful. Desktop projection. If you want to sit at this desk, the top should project further than the base. Many desks have an op[en area so that a ...


1

Firstly the big issue for most woodworkers, the question of screwing into the edges of plywood. You'll see plenty of advice not to do this if you look around, but you'll also see admissions from lots of folks who do it all the same and most will tell you that it works fine if done properly. There are various tips about how best to accomplish this without ...


1

Another method you could use would be to take the total surface area of everything you want to cover, then divide that by the surface area covered by a single OSB sheet. This would give you the approximate amount of OSB sheets needed, and then you could round up to give you the exact amount of OSB sheets needed. E.g. If the total surface area you need ...


1

I'm going to go with Sketch up. One it's free and two if you use it a lot and need more options there is an awesome paid version for anything you would need to do. Also there is a site woodgrears from a guy Mathias Wendel who designed something called Big Print program which is just what your looking for. Able to print stuff to scale them glue it to your ...


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