10

Chisel to create the mortise -- you can save a huge amount of work by drilling out most of the waste. Saw the tenon to slightly over the final size (saw outside the markup lines), then fine tune with plane and chisel (shoulder plane will avoid the need to chisel). There is always a traditional hand-tool solution. It may or may not be more work, and often ...


9

TL;DR warning. While using 'proper' joints is the way that some shed walls were constructed in the recent past* I think I should say something about why this isn't done as much today — because other ways are faster (much faster) while still producing a structure that's fit for purpose. There's a strong parallel to be drawn with the way that a traditional ...


8

The old way to cut a mortise purely by chisel is the following: You need a mortising chisel which is a chisel of the width of the mortise with the sides narrower than the blade, and a mallet. The chisel is held straight up and driven into the wood near one end of the mortise with the flat of the blade facing the near end. The blade is then walked away from ...


8

Copying my answer from the 'by hand' question. The mortise as the other have mentioned can be done with a hammer and chisel, and drilling consecutive holes to the correct depth will help speed the process up. If you have a drill press that will make the job easier and you can be very accurate on how deep you drill all the holes. If you are using power ...


7

You really don't need to over-think this. Let me emphasise that for you, you really don't need to. Even the most modest of tenons provides a very strong joint (assuming it is well cut and glued naturally) and as mentioned in previous Answers many traditional joints are over-engineered for strength. To give two practical examples of why you don't need to ...


7

This doesn't make a lot of sense in my situation, because one third of 60mm is 20mm and 5 times that is 100mm, which is longer then the beam width. I think it's important to remember that these, as in all similar general guidelines about how to size a joint, are just rules of thumb and no rule of thumb needs to be followed slavishly. That's what makes it a ...


7

Long mortises and tenons, like the following, are probably best created with a hand router and a table saw. Mortise For the mortise, you will need A jig or brace to ensure a straight path for your router. A straight router bit with a flat blade on the top will provide the necessary cut. However, a spiral-fluted bit will make the cut easier. Obviously, ...


7

It appears from the description and the photo that the stub cross section is in essence a circle with a chord removed, basically it's a cylinder with a flat bottom. The easiest way to create a matching mortise in wood is to drill a hole of the major diameter, then partially plug it. For a wood-only solution a small piece of dowel sanded or planed down is ...


6

To make the mortise, you can get a dedicated mortising machine: Image courtesy of Harbor Freight You can also get a mortising attachment for your drill press: Image courtesy of LowesNote: Some people feel that these attachments require too much force be applied to the quill and handle of your drill press. I've used my attachment on a bench-top drill press a ...


6

I would try to keep the geometry of the tenons as simple as possible. The important thing is to maximize the contact surface between the side grain surfaces in the glued joint. Since your making a cabinet base you need not totally conceal the connection (I assume you have a top counter surface over the base). Each tenon is half the height of the beam ...


6

I'm not sure exactly in what way the two sides don't line up exactly. Working in from both faces should ensure the 'mouth' of the mortise on each face is pretty much bang-on, even if the mortise cheeks are a bit ragged or drift off. The ideal fix for a badly mis-cut mortise is actually to scrap the piece and start again. I would guess you won't want to do ...


6

Enlarge the tenon Oh I wish I could leave it at just that one sentence ^_^ But it's not obvious how you'd do that. Usually the error in an undersized tenon is quite small and you'd glue slips of veneer to each side that needs it (often it's the cheeks only that need attention). Here you'll need to use thin slips of wood that you cut yourself. When doing ...


6

The thing with hand tools is that the angles are all arbitrary and require no resetting of stops or fixtures. If you can saw to a line, you can saw 90º and 33.4º equally well. Similarly, if you can chop a conventional 90º mortise, you can do any other angle. Here, you'd chop it out the same way. It's a through mortise, so you mark both sides of the joint ...


6

Don't beat yourself up too badly over this. You've just learned empirically (as many of us have!) the one key lesson of flushing projecting tenons or dowels — don't work them1 until they're almost flush already. The way to do this is to saw off as much of the projecting wood as possible (ideally all, but in practice this isn't always doable). You don't ...


5

This design is plenty stout and has lots of extra strength built in to cope with material inconsistency and intermittent stresses put upon it. Those are excellently beefy pegged mortise and tenon joints in good proportion to the project. This method of joinery has been the gold standard for hundreds of years of solid furniture making and if built with even a ...


5

First, as Aloysius says above, you should stay away from the ends of the mortise during bulk removal. 1/16 of an inch or 1-2mm should be sufficient. Now, when you have done a bunch of chopping, and you have chips clogging the mortise, you need to clear them out, as you said. Use a bench chisel that is one "size" below your mortising chisel. For example, ...


5

You don't need to repair this. You're using a tusk tenon, so basically everything is going to be held in place by the wedge. With a different style of M&T joint, secured with glue, one could theorise that the reduced glue surface area might be an issue but it's of no relevance here. But even if this were a glued joint I still think it's nothing to ...


5

If the hollow back doesn't need to be perfect, use a Forstner bit and cut overlapping holes in it to get the desired depth. You could also treat it like a big bandsaw box, and cut all of the sides off, and glue them back together. The glue line on a clean cut with the grain is hardly noticeable. You could also just build a new mantle as a hollow box and ...


4

Another alternative is to make and use a horizontal mortising machine. It's much easier than you might think. I use mine to make loose tenon mortise and tenon joints. It's a joy to use. There were 18 mortise and tenon joints per chair in my dining room table set project. That's 108 joints. That's far too many conventional mortise and tenon joints to be ...


4

Don't lever. Pare straight downward into the opening, taking it in multiple passes if necessary, and letting the chisel act as a wedge to do the work.


4

When traditional joinery techniques were employed on buildings, it was in the form of timber framing, not stick framing. Timber framing employs fewer, larger pieces of wood, which means that the joints can be heftier (especially important for softwood), and there are fewer of them to cut (saving your time). If you are committed to using traditional methods ...


4

Paul Sellers is a master craftsman, author of several books and some very good video tutorials. He does several on cutting mortises - this one probably being most relevant to this topic. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPBkO2chZxk I've learned a lot from watching his videos, still dont have the skill to implement the lessons very well as yet - very much a ...


4

No option, you're going to have to dig into the wood a bit. You need to be able to get a grip on the nail heads to begin to pull them out and if they're sunk below the surface you can only do this by removing some wood. With a bit of luck though you may only need to drill two small holes on either side of each nail, just enough to allow the tips of pliers ...


4

When fitting a joint it's clearly necessary to remove a little wood where the joint doesn't fit yet. But, best not to remove wood that doesn't need to be removed since (e.g.) this can make the joint fit more loosely than necessary. Yes this is very important with most glues used today. Some glues have good gap-filling properties but the three main ones in ...


4

Assuming that the failure to line up is due to small compounded errors, there are a series of small posture and behavioral changes you can make to help make your work more accurate, and you can make guides to help you control the tools. But, given that your mortise holes don't line up, you can probably fix them by analyzing which wall is out of square, and ...


4

All things equal I would leave the gap it is usually easer than cutting out the mortise even with a mortising machine, you may have to adjust the tenon to fit.


4

I am not an expert but i think i would use a flush cut saw instead of a chisel. Make the tenon a little long, at least a 1/4" and then use the flush cut hand saw to cut off the extra. A flush cut saw has straight teeth so as to not gouge the surface it is laying on and moving across. Once it is cut you sand the top. Flush Cut Saws Japanese Hand Saws


4

You could drill a hole the the exact size of the semicircle and then on the one side you could chisel out a square section large enough so you could insert a small block of wood (1/4"1/4"x1/2"long) which fills the chiseled section as well as into the drilled hole to complete the semicircle. Not sure if this is the easiest way but it is an ...


3

There is no magic ratio to grab and be done with. I'm not aware of a set of 'rules of thumb' that apply universally. It depends on wood selection and maintaining the joints when they start to loosen and on the abuse the table will suffer, at the hands of users less inclined to be gentle (six-year-old boys come to mind). The strength of the wood in 'area z' ...


3

I found myself in exactly the same situation as the OP, on exactly the same project. I'm also building the Sellers workbench, and on my first mortise the holes were both very badly off vertical. My leg pieces are 90 x 90, and the mortise holes "missed" by about 5mm at the halfway point. Looking at it afterwards, the error was very obvious but my ...


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