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5

From the youtube videos I've watched it seems that the 45 degree heavy duty chamfer bit 36-950 from Infinity Tools is the go to bit for this sort of job, however it also appears that this only comes in 1/2 inch shank :-( When the cutter approaches or exceeds the cost of a new router (and perhaps it's worth mentioning that routers litter the secondhand-tool ...


4

it also appears that this only comes in 1/2 inch shank A 45° cutter that's large enough to cut the full 22mm thickness of your work will have to be at least 44mm in diameter, plus the diameter of the shaft, for a total of 51mm or more. You wouldn't want a sharpened chunk of metal that large spinning at 10,000rpm or more on a 1/4" shank. I'm just ...


-1

After fighting with the most stubborn unable to budge bit, I eventually freed it, basically using brute strength. I then decided to try and ensure that I don't have the same problem again. What I did was to grind two flats on each of my router bits. I used my Dremel fitted with a carborundum grinding bit. You must ensure that flats are parallel. I now use a ...


1

I think vibration you're getting is a combination of factors. Most trim bits are straight bits and straight bits tend to vibrate more, specially when engaged for their full length. You're also trying to move a lot of relatively hard wood, so your feed rate is important. Using a spiral bit and feeding slow and easy should help. Also, hogging the bulk of waste ...


1

The usual advice for hogging out this kind of joint is to make a jig and use a table saw with a dado set or successive overlapping cuts. The jig would have a movable stop so you can cut the mating sides. This is also the best way to make the throat of the slot relatively square, which you will not get with any ordinary router tool. Using a router would be a ...


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