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16

Let's tackle the second part of your question first. when/why would I want to use [a crosscut sled] over the fence on a saw? It is extremely unsafe to use your table saw's fence for crosscuts because such a small surface is registered against the fence. It would be easy to twist the workpiece and cause a kickback, or at the very least ruin your workpiece....


13

Using the aforementioned work table, I had placed other wood below the work piece, to prop it up, but could not get a tight fit so everything just moved around. I think a simple mod here could get this method to work (I've used something similar myself when planing thinner stock many times) although it wouldn't be the primary way I'd suggest you go about ...


11

"Paste wax" is the go-to wax for your purpose and for waxing tool surfaces. Avoid buying a wax that contains silicone, because the silicone can directly or indirectly get transferred onto your wood and cause problems when you go to apply finish. I've also been told to avoid car wax since it can contain silicone and apparently it can also contain abrasives (...


11

Take a sled and add a pivot as far away from the blade as you want your radius. (riving knife and guards can remain in place) As preparation rough cut your piece on the band-saw. source Then put your piece on the sled and attach it to the pivot. Clamp it down to avoid the piece rotating while you are cutting and make a cut. Unclamp, rotate, clamp and cut ...


10

You want to pay attention to the type of tooth grind, which describes how the individual teeth are shaped. Vermont American has a good resource for types of grinds. Any grind combination with at least one flat tooth should give you a flat-bottomed cut. So good candidates would be: Flat Top Grind (often used for ripping) Triple Chip Grind (for hard, ...


9

I'm of the same mind, Peter. All the plans I've seen require removal of too much safety equipment. There are too many other tools that would suffice- from a band saw for smaller circles to a jig saw or router on a commercial or shop made trammel for large ones. e.g. Band saw- Or router.. Or for a jig saw..


9

Actually, a crosscut sled is more closely related to the miter gauge than to the fence -- it's a moving platform, guided by the miter gauge slots, with a slot that the blade rises through and rails in front and back perpendicular to that slot. (And typically some other safety features.) The advantage is that they give you more control than the miter ...


8

You can add a guard to the front so you can still use the full (planned) depth of the blade all the way through the cut without the sharp bits peeking through. Then add a backstop so you can't push the sled so far that the blade would cut through that guard. Add a handle on the front to the side a obvious holding point so your hand is not near the blade. ...


8

Let's talk teeth! There are more types of grinds, but I feel these are the applicable ones for your question: Flat top (FT/FTB) An FT or FTB blade is one which has flat teeth that you're looking for. Alternate Top Bevel (ATB) An Alternate Top Bevel (It will be marked ATB on the blade) is one which has alternating beveled teeth, like the one you mentioned. ...


7

This can be done safely on a table saw, although the workpiece must be held securely on a jig of some sort. With a slight mod one of the ripping sleds shown in this Answer could be used. In terms of power saws the bandsaw is the ideal choice for this, even allowing the cut to be done safely freehand. In addition it has the thinnest kerf so you lose the ...


7

In my opinion, the biggest advantage of cutting your own guides is that you fine-tune them to your table saw's miter tracks. The miter tracks have manufacturing tolerances, and are probably not exactly 3/4 inches. Worse, each miter track is probably a little different in width. When cutting your own guides you can sneak up on the width for each track to ...


7

Unless you already have a straight edge on your board, your fence will just replicate the errors of one edge to the other. What you need is a straight edge jig. It's fairly easy to build. Here's an example from the Wood Magazine. There's also many videos on YouTube.


6

Forrest sells a blade which is totally flat. If you have an old saw blade that needs resharpening, most sharpening companies can regrind your blade when they sharpen it to make it a flat top grind.


6

The one advantage that seems to get people excited? Variable width / spacing. If you have a fixed width / spacing jig then you either have to design your projects based on the spacing, letting the tool determine the design, or you end up with a partial dovetail. That partial dovetail may or may not be ugly, especially if you can center it on the piece, but ...


6

The sled is made out of 18mm-thick MDF. I would only be leaving behind 3mm thickness of wood to allow a dado deep enough for the T-track. Is that enough? My brain works in Imperial units, so I'm going to convert. Three millimeters is about equal to 1/8". MDF is not a particularly strong material in bending, especially not with that thin of a section. You ...


6

I have not heard the term "table saw boat" before, but it seems they refer to the same thing. How to Build a Sled or Boat for a Table Saw Build a sled or boat for your table saw


5

[T]hese sleds didn't have a cross piece on the opposing side, I suppose to accommodate material deeper than the sled - maybe it's as simple as that. If that board is missing then it would be a large contributing factor to the sled overall flatness. That board sole purpose is to help keep the jig flat. Consider the following picture where a crosscuts sleds ...


5

As a rule there is no one best material for anything, although for jigs it's almost universal that plywood or MDF are recommended these days for the major elements, but they are not the only options. Also note that not all ply or MDF is created equal, and the storage conditions where they were bought is a factor too (whether stored dead flat being the main ...


5

I have a pair of dovetail templates. They came with a pair of bits to do the cutting. These are some of the 'cheap' ones but still cost me enough. The first problem I had was they just sent the aluminum template. It was my job to mount them on wooded blocks (for clamping to the board) and adjust them so that they fit snugly (the pins and tails). This ...


5

especially since you already 'hold' down the piece and turn it around I use bench clamps like these. You attach them to the top of you bench permanently. I have them on 3 corners (of my bench). they do an excellent job of hold your work piece and you can do most of the board then turn it around and work on the end that was held down.


5

Use double sided tape to affix the piece you are working on to a thicker piece, and use your bench dogs. Similar to how you can use a sled on a planer to plane thin stock. I use SpecTape from either Woodcraft or Amazon. It holds material very securely.


5

I have not cut chair legs with an irregular profile, but I have successfully ripped 1" diameter dowels. The process is to make a sled and run it through the table saw. But the sled is inverted from what you might normally consider a sled. The sled is made as shown with a square tunnel running the length of the sled and capped at the rear end. You will ...


5

The difference can be arbitrary. Or to put it another way the terms might be considered interchangeable. I don't use the term fixture although I've seen it in print often enough. Jig is one I use a lot and I'd judge it to be much more commonly used by others too, although the type of thing they're used to describe could differ slightly from person to ...


5

I get the same tracks, and they come out pretty easily with the orbital as you mentioned. This happens as small variations in downward pressure will occur when making passes with the router sled. One option is to "fix" your router in the sled then simply move the sled itself instead of moving the router up and down a channel that runs the length of the sled....


4

What I think makes most of such jigs dangerous is that they allow rotation of the work piece while cutting. That is not a safety issue per se, but at the begging of the process, the work piece is not a circle at all which makes it awkward to work with. Here's what I suggest use a sacrificial board like a table saw sled, this will become the "jig", but it ...


4

I wanted to build on the information from ratchet freak's answer Concerning the runners and gauge slots of the table saw Runners in most cases are sized to the tables mitre gauge slots. A dimentionally stable material is recommended (not required) so that the runners will not change in size too much and risk the sled binding. People still use wood ...


4

A fixture holds the piece for machining using work reference points for location. A jig guides the tool for machining features in their correct location. An example of a fixture would be if you made a table saw sled made to cut a 23 degree cut 5" from the end of a board. A jig is something you use to guide a tool for an operation. i.e. a pocket hole jig ...


4

I'll try to answer the question as good as possible myself, but on a few points I'm in over my head. Is the grain direction a problem for me? As far as the cutting goes it shouldn't be a problem, one should use sacrificial boards in the places where the router-bit/saw-blade comes out though, as the long grain will probably tear out otherwise. If I use ...


4

A simpler option may be to fake it. Instead of an actual box joint you could make a fake looking one by making the cuts in one board and then filling the voids with wood in the other grain direction. This works really well with contrasting woods. The actual joint will be a butjoint like the second image. But it will look like a box joint. That way you don'...


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