Hot answers tagged

8

A Google search for "metalic edge banding" comes up with several options. There is the flat, glue on style that goes on like any other wood based edging: From edgecoinc.com There is also aluminum (or other metal) T-rail style that presses into a slot routed or cut into the edge of the piece: from aluminumsys.com Note: Not affiliated with either company, ...


7

A cursory search comes up with T-Moulding. Knowing that I can then find pseudo chrome T-moulding for arcade cabinets. Not advocating any particular product but showcasing an example. The one pictured in your question is likely plastic to help it conform to the curves of the case however I could be wrong. Image from a eBay search result Should be easy ...


6

For edge routing, you need a tall router-table fence. Clamped to your router table, this provides a perpendicular surface to guide your boards past the bit. As the linked should point out, the bit gets buried into the fence's surface (ather than trapping the workpiece between the bit and fence which would almost certainly cause a high-speed kickback ...


4

If you're looking for structural integrity, not pretty, simply nail a 2x4 to the wall against the flat trim. Several 16d nails should be sufficient to hold your weight. If you need something to look nicer, you might get a 1x? (width to match the existing trim) and replace the existing trim, then stain to match. Use finishing nails to hold it up, but since ...


4

I feel like this is one of those answers where more than one answer can be right. It boils down to experience and what you were taught. I understand shoe molding as the molding family that is partnered with a baseboard. In the same way that crown molding describes the family of molding used to finish top edges. When used on baseboard the quarter round is ...


4

They're used almost interchangeably today, but no there is a slight difference. Shoe molding is wider/taller (depending on orientation) in one direction than the other and the curve isn't a perfect arc, rather than being a perfect 1/4 of a circle as in quarter round. via http://thecraftsmanblog.com/quarter-round-vs-shoe-molding/:


4

Can you as a home owner do this? Yes, absolutely! The easiest way is to buy a stain finish combo. Miniwax (and many others) have a stain and poly or stain and some other finish mixed together. What is great about this is that it is treated similar to a paint, you can brush it on, it generally has a shallower stain but usually pretty even and so takes a ...


4

Since stain gets darker the longer you let it sit, you'll want to keep the time the stain is on consistent. The biggest advantage to doing it all at once is that you can develop a rhythm to it. If you need to break it into sub-projects, there shouldn't be any issue with that, you may want to use a timer to keep track of how long the stain's on. It's ...


3

With power tools you'll want to use a table saw. Rip thin strips off a larger piece of stock, tilt your blade to the appropriate angle for the miter (22.5 degrees in this case), set your fence for the desired distance from the point to the edge, and rip them to width. Since this is so small you'll probably want to set up featherboards and/or hold downs. ...


3

Scribe, saw and pare until you get a good fit, fix in place. It really is about as simple as that. Remember the tight fit only has to be right at the edge, it can be undercut away from the edge and won't make any difference — which based on the third photo it appears is how the original is done. But this joint doesn't have to be done this way. You can cut ...


3

Spindle sander, drum sander, belt sander (using both the flat and the end drum parts.) Some parts of those will require a spindle or drum, on casual examination. Should help getting the router-burn marks out as well. Rasps or microplanes of various shapes may also be useful. As would a plane if you're up for sharpening it, as most people these days are ...


3

It is not necessary. Adding another coat of poly would make the finished project a little tougher and resistant to wear, but it also shines it up a bit more, which may or may not be an effect you are wanting. In the case of baseboards and trim, they aren't really going to see much wear anyway, so another coat isn't giving you much benefit. So as long as you'...


3

I think a tall fence, with a gap for trim, is the best solution, but I also had great success with the following experiment. I wanted to solve the setup problem of aligning the fence with the flush trim bit so I constructed a single point-of-contact fence instead, that uses the guide bearing on the trim bit as the second contact point: There is a 1/8" ...


2

Honestly, I would not do this. There are many techniques for blind-nailing trim if you really want it to look nice and want to minimize finishing steps to hide nail heads. Also, as suggested in the comments, there already is a technique for angling nails so you maximize the strength of the fastener interface. When I was in the trades I saw that there were ...


2

For this particular situation, I would take your 2x4 or 6? fence and along the bottom notch or rabbet it to have a groove that is tall enough and deep enough to let the lip pass without obvious friction (on the bottom side facing the bit). That way you can have a tall fence to push the board against keeping it straight and still let the lip pass freely to ...


2

I actually thought of this question yesterday when I was replacing trim. It seems the people who built my house nailed from the top trim to the side trim. I'm not sure about gluing them, because if you need to replace one side, you may have to replace them all if you can't separate the glue joint.


1

I would definitely use glue. I would also use a 23 gauge pin only in event that the joint was misaligned and needed to be kept in place until the glue dries.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible