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17

Good, fast, or cheap. Choose any two. Factory methods like pocket holes, screws, and even finger-joints are good enough for mass market construction without having to hire journeymen carpenters. This is how furniture can be made as cheaply as it is. This is just a fact of modern globalism. This is the only way to offer furniture to a global market at scale ...


6

Your initial thinking is correct. You're much better loading the sides directly than transferring the load through a joint in a shearing manner. The first method of construction is more typical in cabinetry because the load isn't usually directly on the top sheet, it is on a countertop that spans the sides. This effectively transforms it into the ...


5

Dovetails can be obsolete in the sense they aren’t entirely needed depending on how strong the joint needs to be. Glues can be stronger than the wood in the sense that the surface fibers the glue is adhered to will pull apart and fail before the glue does. That doesn’t mean a glued joint is stronger than one that is dovetailed and glued. One of the ...


4

The simple answer is yes and no. It is true that modern glues are stronger than the wood but only on long grain to long grain joints, dovetail joints are mostly used on long to short grain joints like corners on drawer boxes. Having said that many other corner joints will be very strong and durable, but much easer and quicker to make. Dovetail joints are ...


4

In addition to the economic factors @jdv mentioned, there's been a change in social norms over the last few decades: People now move very frequently compared to the past, and those moves are often far away. Some of my furniture is clearly designed to be cleanly disassembled and can then be packed compactly for moving. Woodwork that is assembled using ...


4

Like you, I have built a great deal, but I am not a structural engineer so my recommendations are more intuitive than definitive. I would recommend extending the length of the scabs as much as possible. If you are creating the arches from 10' framing I would use the same for the scab and cut it to the curve. I would apply fasteners 1' OC. staggered top ...


3

I think that there is a huge 'it depends' in the question. The dependence is based upon 4 things: The nature of forces on the joint (lateral vs. compression vs. expansion) Time Expectation - The willingness of both you and the 'customer' (whoever it is) to pay for your time. (even if its a spouse, your time in the garage and not with them is worth ...


3

When using pressure-treated wood for exterior construction treating any cut surfaces is considered good practice, but that's generally for nailed/screwed construction where even inside a joint water is assumed to be able to wick inside. When you're using glue however the joint faces will be sealed by the glue so this doesn't apply, and any preservative or ...


2

Not to repeat JustSaying, I would say the answer is no, they are not obsolete. While strength is one component of a joint, esthetic is another. Who doesn't love a good dovetail? It's a detail that makes one piece stand well above another that could be stronger.


2

Use a 3/8" or a M10 or so threaded insert. Epoxy it into the ends (don't rely on the threads of the insert). For the top piece, bore a hole down the center for some threaded rod, and then epoxy a nut in the end. This will allow you to tighten it against the ceiling. While it is true that inserts set into end grain aren't as strong as they are into ...


2

Let's capture some of the comments in an Answer. For this application almost any joint will do. Though, riding toys are subject to forces that might warrant putting on our engineering caps. The idea here is that the rails of the wagon are like rails on a deck. When force is applied at the top of the railing this translates to a lot of force at the joint, ...


2

An edit with a sketch image was added after i wrote the answer below. As designed in the sketch i would add legs under the half lap joints in the middle. One leg under each joint. Using 2x6 boards laid flat is not a sound plan. They will be much to flexy and will sag significantly. Typically a slat bed has a box frame with a cleat on the inside that the ...


1

Your comment really clarifies your needs. Please add the RR benchwork description to your original question. It is a big help. Now that I can picture your project, I would suggest some small light colored screws instead of wooden dowels. Now I see the need for the Acrylic between your track levels but wooden dowels will be very visible in the clear plastic. ...


1

The ones you may have been looking at with the threaded rod and insert must have small threaded rods for connecting the pieces together. A threaded rod and inserts can be quite strong. Use at 1/4" or greater diameter rod and it should be strong enough. There is nothing wrong with having the end grain for the inserts for this projects. See my markup ...


1

The hardware you are looking for is called a "cam lock." The round, locking piece is the cam lock nut. It uses a corresponding bolt called, naturally enough, the cam lock bolt.


1

Hey i usually over engineer stuff cuz im paranoid, doesnt necessarily mean I have the best answer. I am a carpenter but have never done a bridge. I would span the scabs to 8’ using plywood so i could easily cut the arch, and put 1-2 layers of 3/4” plywood on either side of the arches. If the scabs are visible and you want it to look good after just extend ...


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