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21

A planer is used for making two edges parallel while a jointer is used for making straight or flat surfaces. Let's say you have a warped board (suppose it looks like a banana from end to end). If you pass it through a planer, it will enter as a banana and exit as a banana. A jointer, on the other hand, will shave off bits of the banana, little by little, ...


17

Similar to bowlturner's answer, my answer depends on having access to a drill press. However, I suggest you use a few jigs. I've done similar projects, and the biggest problem is that a forstner bit tends to skate around when you're dealing with angles that steep. (There's nothing for the center point to grab into until you're 1/2 way through the piece.) ...


16

I have something akin to an answer, but I might consider it more like advice. Rust begets Rust- purely anecdotal, but I feel like rust left unattended promotes more rust. I would first work to rid yourself of as much rust as possible. Things like naval jelly, baking soda and similar will be your friends. Moisture is the enemy - Whether it be your home, your ...


16

Batteries in general have several points worth concerning their usage. Yes, you are asking about storage but it is worth knowing that their storage strategy is influence by their usage frequency as well. Which type you have is important. There is not one overall method. Li-Ion (Lithium Ion) Like most batteries they should be stored at room temperate and ...


16

a Swanson speed square has a lip on one side that makes it really good for quickly drawing a perpendicular line on a work piece A try square is similar in that respect: the handle is thicker than the blade, so it's easy to push the inside of the handle up against the edge of a board and mark (or verify) a line perpendicular (square) to the edge. And you can ...


15

A planer will ensure that 2 opposite faces of a piece of wood are parallel to each other will generally handle wider pieces of wood is not the appropriate tool for working the narrow edge of a 'wide' x 'thin' board (think shelving), as you cannot safely feed a tall, skinny piece of wood through it allow you to make an uneven board an even thickness from one ...


15

I agree with the comments above that this question is a little too broad, but "college student's budget" and "limited space" give at least a starting point and I can offer a few pointers based on that. Not only for budget reasons you're looking at primarily a hand-tool approach. In addition to the cost of power tools working with hand tools is quieter (so ...


13

Personally, I would use my drill press. The bed will tilt to any angle and then you just clamp the board to the bed. You would need a piece of waste wood under the board so not to put the bit into the metal bed. I think Forstner bits would be the better idea for doing this though using a spade bit might be possible, if you lower it slow enough, I don't ...


13

You have there what's called a saw jointer. The one below is very similar. The site linked as the source says it's similar to a Stearn's model, so that might be what you have. (source) These are used to joint (flatten) the teeth of a hand saw to one level. After jointing, one would then sharpen each individual tooth such that the points are now at the ...


13

I'm glad someone finally asked a Question about alternatives to these jigs. In the US at least, and probably in other parts of the world by now, pocket holes have become synonymous with Kreg. While they make good products that work exactly the way you'd hope, they can be expensive and their dominance of the market has led to a pervading belief among new ...


12

Currently Saber Saw and Jigsaw refer to the same tool. My Dad always called the top item a Saber Saw. Up through the 1980's, the hand held tool was referred to as a Saber Saw in Popular Mechanics, but was called a Jigsaw by the manufacturers. The name Jigsaw predates hand held tools by about 100 years. It then referred to what we now call a scroll saw. ...


12

When discussing tools, there is a spectrum ranging from construction tools (good enough for framing a house but not necessarily precision instruments) to machinist tools (which are typically highly precise). Woodworking tools fall somewhere in between. A try square like the one pictured in your question is great for scribing or drawing 90 degree lines, but ...


12

The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth will engage the material being cut. A high or positive hook angle means the outermost tip of each tooth will engage very aggressively, whereas a low or negative hook angle causes each tooth to take a less aggressive bite. (Source) How do I choose a blade based on hook angle? Use a blade with a negative ...


12

The usual way to do this I think would be to use the correct bit in a router, but it could also be done using a suitable cutter chucked up in a drill. If using a drill ideally it will be in a drill stand for accuracy and repeatability, or a drill press will be used. Round-nosed router bit: [Source] 'Rotary file' or burr for drills: [Source] It's a ...


12

After doing a fair bit of research the general consensus is use whatever you have available and you feel comfortable with. That being said, there are several points worth making about all three tools and it's important to note the differences. Dial Works mechanically and usually in 1/1000th of an inch increments. Assuming the rack and pinion are free of ...


12

Hollow auger U.S. Patent 203,384 is for a "Hollow auger" or more specifically for improvements to a hollow auger. "What's a hollow auger?" you ask. Well, as @Keshlam suggested it is a device for cutting tenons on chair rungs or spokes as demonstrated by a similar device on a You Tube video. It's a device that, rather than drilling a hole, it drills what ...


11

Like anything it depends, but the list is fairly small either way. For the Lathe itself you can use almost any of them, though I would recommend at least a Midi-Lathe, the larger bench-top lathes. I would recommend at least 8-10" swing if you want more than finger bowls. There are many different options and price points. I started with a cheap Midi and ...


11

Hand saws may never get used in a shop that turns out cabinets exclusively, but in most shops they have a wide variety of uses. Yes, there are specific rip and crosscut saws, but the woodworkers I know have mostly adopted Japanese style hand saws. A ryoba saw is a great tool to have around. It has crosscut teeth on one side and ripping teeth on the other. ...


11

As bowlturner mentioned, a drill press with a Forstner bit is the first solution that comes to mind. If you don't have a drill press, another solution is to cut the corner off a block of scrap wood at a 45-degree angle. Use a brad point, auger, or twist bit to drill straight through the newly-cut end, and clamp it to your workpiece for each hole. If you've ...


11

Yes, it's possible to wear out an impact driver, but what you're describing sounds normal. The driver will act as a normal drill until it exceeds its "normal driving" capacity, then the internal hammers will engage and you'll hear a whacking/clicking/grinding sound. The sound is similar to that of the clutch when you're using the clutch. Some impact ...


11

The primary reason for speed adjustment on bandsaws is to accommodate different materials (mainly metal). That said, dropping the speed down for some operations can stretch the capabilities of an underpowered machine further. For example, if you're resawing particularly thick or dense wood with a 1.5 hp machine (or high-TPI blade), reducing the blade speed ...


11

One website states that hickory and ash are really the only (US domestic) woods worth using. Obviously just one man's opinion and a gross over-simplification. It's also inherently misleading because it's light on detail. In reality while hickory is broadly speaking worthy of its reputation as a premier handle wood it obscures certain facts. The first is if ...


11

I am trying to figure out why that was the standard at the time. Not sure if this is a chicken/egg issue, but I think the answer has to do with a tool called a brace. The first braces were no more than curved pieces of wood with a tapered metal inlet at one end that received different bits. The bit was held in via the wedging action of the tapered end. (...


10

Pipe clamps are very inexpensive compared to parallel bar clamps (also called K-body clamps), and have a virtually infinite range of clamping capacities because you can always replace your pipe with a longer or shorter one, or extend it with a pipe union and another pipe. With a parallel bar clamp, you're stuck with the length you originally purchased. You ...


10

The cutterhead you pictured in your question is a Byrd Shelix cutterhead, which produces a shearing helical cut using square, 4-sided carbide inserts. There are also other configurations of segmented cutterheads with carbide inserts which produce cuts of varying quality. Contrary to popular belief, helical cutterheads--even the widely-acclaimed Byrd Shelix ...


10

Cutting a board along its thickness--in this case, cutting a 2" thick board in half to produce two ~1" thick boards--is called resawing. Hand Tools Only With practice, you can resaw the boards in half with a handsaw or frame saw or traditional bow saw (not to be confused with a modern bowsaw, which is better suited for pruning trees and cutting small logs)....


10

Back it down with a stair walker: http://www.amazon.com/Capacity-Appliance-Truck-Stair-Climber/dp/B00O39FJ2S/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1454178497&sr=8-3&keywords=stair+dolly


9

Hmmm. Where to start. While a cheap contractors table saw 'can' do a lot if you're willing to work at it, a full sized table saw will be much better, and a cabinet saw would be best. If you are using sheet material you'll either need to make a special table to help you cut or have an extra pair of hands to help. Clamps, Clamps, Clamps, you can never have ...


9

I've made several wands on my lathe and it works just fine. I've gotten them down to close to a 1/4" thickness. However, there is vibration and chatter that happens so, you have a couple options. One includes spending money, getting a steady rest makes it SO easy that if you are going to do a bunch it might be worth it, there are even plans for making ...


9

The easiest way is to use a table saw. If you don't have a table saw, then yes, a circular saw would work pretty well. If you want a nice straight edge clamp another straight board or other straightedge to the board so that it guides the saw. To set up, first measure the distance from the edge of the saw's sole plate to the blade and then add the width ...


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