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Simple answer: put some water on it. If you have an old oil stone, then it probably still has some oil buried in the nooks and crannies. If you put water on it, some of that oil will probably lift off and make the water "oily". You'll see various artifacts of water and oil - a film, a rainbow sheen, drops suspended in the water, etc. If it's a ...


2

Can anyone tell me if this is a oil sharpening stone or water sharpening stone? Now that we have a photo to go on it's at least possible to say this was definitely an oil stone in its day, because of the box. Honing-stone boxes don't come to look like that unless they've been used around oil for a long, long time. What is it? As covered in a previous Q&...


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While a 45 degree angle is quite high, this should work. It is common to use higher angles in bevel-up planes to prevent tear-out in more difficult woods (i.e. figured, reversing grain, or difficult species). The higher angle will cause the plane to be more difficult to push, but in a narrow plane like this that shouldn't matter. There's not really a whole ...


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Without seeing or handling a scraper that has gone through a sharpening process and isn't working it is hard to diagnose what's gone wrong, but there are some common problems that you might be experiencing. If the user is unable to create any burr at all1 I believe the most common issue (and the one I think most likely to be the cause here) is the prior ...


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My personal experience leads me to say yes you can. I've been storing my waterstones in a plastic tote just as you mentioned for 10+ years now and there have been no issues of swelling or degradation. But that may not be the case for all waterstones as there are a variety of them available including different materials and, of course, grit. The main thing I'...


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Adding another answer to my own question: Recently, Lee Valley Tools tackled this question and did an analysis of all the manual-sharpening abrasives they carry -- from sandpaper to stones to polishes -- reconciling the differences between grit-size systems, manufacturer's labels, materials and cutting patterns, with some comments on cost and maintenance of ...


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