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Normal grinding wheels are made from abrasive grit bonded together in a vitrified medium, so they're like a ceramic. This makes them hard and durable, but very brittle, and even the smallest defect can lead to catastrophic breakage which of course takes place at high rotational speeds, throwing the pieces off at very high velocities1. One of the functions of ...


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Simple answer: put some water on it. If you have an old oil stone, then it probably still has some oil buried in the nooks and crannies. If you put water on it, some of that oil will probably lift off and make the water "oily". You'll see various artifacts of water and oil - a film, a rainbow sheen, drops suspended in the water, etc. If it's a ...


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My personal experience leads me to say yes you can. I've been storing my waterstones in a plastic tote just as you mentioned for 10+ years now and there have been no issues of swelling or degradation. But that may not be the case for all waterstones as there are a variety of them available including different materials and, of course, grit. The main thing I'...


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It's a No. 1 Washita. The original color will be coral/light yellow and butterscotch mottling. You could just use as is. Use a citrus solvent as a honing fluid. It will cut the oil that is in it and hopefully more and more will come out in use. Simple Green or Bio-Green Clean also work well, they emulsify the oil and give a nice honing juice. That stone will ...


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