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8

The simplest solution of all is seems to be to just to buy plastic end caps/edge protectors, which are available from some online tool vendors: But these have a few problems. The available sizes won't fit all chisel widths you might eventually collect (both Imperial and metric), and while you can always go up a size in theory as vintage chisels are often ...


6

Keep them! or send them to me :) Many folks claim older gouges work better than new. There are a few extra steps needed to save an old gouge. Remove the rust, gunk and the like. Then using your sharpening stones make sure the flat backs are, indeed, flat (if the gouges in question have flat backs). If the cutting edge is chipped, then you will need to ...


6

I have sharpened similar tools. I very rarely will ever touch the interior cutting surface of a gouge, except to remove and burr that may occur. I typically do this with a small flat file. I believe they are called jewelers files and came in my pack of rat tailed and shaped files specifically for this purpose. Even when affixing sandpaper to a metal ruler or ...


6

How do I sharpen curved tools like gouges? Very carefully. In addition to the obvious things of striving to maintain the bevel angle(s) and the shape of the cutting edge (many have a curved profile) the conventional advice is to be extremely careful not to put a tiny bevel on the opposite side to the main bevel, the reason given that it can hamper getting ...


4

I use a product called Dipseal for stuff like that. If you have ever had a saw blade sharpened, this is the stuff that the edges are covered in when you get it back. It can be melted and reused. I bought a 5 pound container of it years ago, and use it to coat forstner bits, chisels, and really anything with an edge that I want to protect. You can ...


4

The traditional answer is to use slipstones to sharpen the interior the 'v'. As already mentioned files will work and if you are curious about using sand paper (also as known as the scary sharp method), you can create a little strip of wood that fits the interior shape of the 'v' and glue sand paper to it. Now you can use this sand paper block to sharpen the ...


4

I just went through a very similar process. I bought a bunch of old Mifer (Spanish) gouges from craigslist. I tried to bevel them on the stones but the steel was way too hard and thick and just took too long. After about an hour on one chisel I decided to give the grinder a go. You can do nearly the same thing by hand but it will just take a lot longer. ...


3

A fabric or leather tool roll is another classic solution, if you're willing to protect the set rather than individual chisels.


3

Assuming they are high speed steel (most likely) using a very fine file ... And lots of patience, you can reface the tool. Follow the same pitch, and remove material until there isn't any more gauling. Otherwise, I would invest in a bench top belt sander.


2

Usually tools like gouges are sharpened using a very fine grinding wheel. There are lots of different jigs usually sold to keep the angle consistent while rotating the tool. As with sharpening of flat tools, your mileage will vary if sharpening freehand. You can also create your own jigs for keeping the angle consistent against the wheel. EDIT: For smaller ...


2

Ifyou're uneasy about honing gouges freehand,honing guides for gouges can be purchased (Just Google "gouge honing guide"). However, it is very simple to make one that works very effectively. Here are pictures of the one I made. It is too simple to even bother with instructions. The images should be enough. (I would advise against sharpening one-handed. In ...


2

I keep my good set of bench chisels, which are always razor sharp, in a leather roll. The problem I run into with keeping chisels in a roll is that if you want to put them in edge end first, they tend to cut right through the back of the roll in any material I've come across. What I did to solve it was to buy some craft clear plastic like I've linked below, ...


1

I think there are two possible answers here, both of which may be right. The first is, "that's the way we make them". There may be multiple reasons they made them that way (including the one that follows in the next paragraph, but also simply tradition, giving the customer what they expect to see and some others). The second is for strength. Professional ...


1

Like anything, it all depends. Since these are turning tools and not gouges for fine woodcarving, you don't need to worry quite as much about having a perfect edge that will give you a clean shave. I use a fairly fine grinding wheel to sharpen all my curved woodturning gouges. There are plenty of jigs to help make a 'perfect' grind, however, I do mine all ...


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