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16

You can "collapse" them into much smaller hoops (see http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/skills/folding-bandsaw-blades-simple-as-one-two-three/). It brings it down to about a third of the size and can be stored in a drawer. From the page: Hold the blade in front of you with one hand, keeping the teeth pointing away from you. Wear a ...


14

Your blade will start to show signs of dullness. These include: Binding Excessive force required to advance cut Excessive tearing/chipout Burning the wood It helps if you can remember the "feel" of cutting with a sharp blade to help recognize these signs. One of them alone may be a result of improper technique. But when multiple signs stack up, you can be ...


12

Plexiglass works well with a craft knife too. If you score it a couple of times with a straight rule, it should snap cleanly along the break.


11

Sometimes when people believe their saw is dull, what it really needs is a cleaning. The resins from the wood build up in the teeth over time and gum up the cutting edge. Soaking the blade in simple green or another cleaner of choice and then scrubbing the teeth with an old toothbrush can prolong cutting life.


8

I've done this successfully with my hand mitre saw, though the cut may not be as much cleaner (than with the blade you have) as you expect. I often use metal-cutting blades for wood on my jigsaw. On melamine-coated chipboard you get a much nicer cut than with the finest wood blades I can easily buy (which aren't very fine). Blades for metal also seem to ...


8

Although you do want a high tooth count for a higher-quality cut, an ultra-high tooth count can be detrimental. With a 100T 7-1/4" blade, you'll have to cut more slowly and may burn the plastic. If using a 7-1/4" circular saw blade, use a high-quality 50-60 tooth blade, which will perform similarly to the 10" 80T blade that Aloysius Defenestrate's local ...


8

All else being equal, anytime you have a choice between HSS (high speed steel) and carbide, you have to consider the tradeoffs. High-Speed Steel Advantages: Cheaper up-front Easier to sharpen Less brittle Disadvantages: Potentially more expensive long-term (depending on application) Wears faster (must be sharpened or replaced more frequently) Carbide ...


8

MDF is tough on blades, since it's basically sawdust and glue. You may want to consider trying a blade specifically designed for cutting laminate flooring, since the majority of the material in laminate is usually MDF. Table saw blades designed for this purpose are usually polycrystalline diamond tipped, and have a surprisingly low tooth count (~12-16 for a ...


6

There are many ways to eliminate tearout in plywood. Some are simple techniques you can apply in specific situations, and others require additional materials or accessories. Put the "good" side facing down. If you are cutting through 2 or more pieces of plywood at the same time, layer them so the "good" sides are not facing the outside on the top or bottom. ...


5

Watching the carter band saw tips and tricks video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU) Alex Snodgrass states co-planer is not what you want. Instead the top wheel and bottom wheel should be canted slightly to the middle and blade tooth side (Top wheel / bottom wheel \ ) and you should be aiming to have the gullet of the blade tracking in the center....


5

Using a blade with finer teeth will help significantly, but you can also use a piece of masking tape over the cut line before you cut. Additionally, if you have a piece of sacrificial wood you can put underneath the cut, that would help prevent tearout as well.


5

Leaf springs from the pick&pull junkyard. Already has an eyelet, reasonably straight, beefy, sharpen-able, ... what's not to like? Heck, just come by my yard and see what you want. (Though from the looks of it, you're 2,928 miles away. Maybe start driving soon.)


4

It's hard to diagnose a problem like this without at least good photos of everything so the following involves some guesswork. Is a stone with coarse/fine surfaces enough for what I am doing? Impossible to say with certainty because of the variables. Unfortunately stones (diamond abrasive plates as well) graded as coarse, medium, fine etc. are by no ...


4

The other answers correctly state that leaf springs make excellent froes, especially if you can find ones with the eyes already attached. However, any kind of steel will work for a froe. The edge isn't used for cutting wood and is only active at the very beginning of the splitting, otherwise it's the wedge that gets the job done. Thus, the steel has no need ...


4

Leaf springs are by far the most popular retrieval from junkyards because they are made from carbon steel and have convenient, simple, useful shape. Leaf springs are made from a wide variety of different steels so there will be no way to know what you are dealing with. Axles are also good steel, although finding rod axles is harder and harder these days. ...


4

The people at my local plastics place would say yes. (Their specific suggestion was 10", 80T.) They also said feed fast, though not so fast as to be unsafe.


4

They can be hung in an out of the way corner. Ideally on a piece of wood with a curved channel the blade rests in so the it doesn't kink.


3

The main thing I get confused over is that middle number. If it says 1/8" or 3/8" etc. is that how wide the blade is? You are correct. The middle number is the width of the blade. Thinner blades are better at cutting tighter curves, but are harder to use to cut straight lines. Wider blades are good for things like resawing, where you are always aiming for a ...


3

In addition to cathode's excellent suggestions, Wood Magazine has a nice explanation of some techniques. Particularly: Score the cutline. Make one very shallow cut where you cut through the top layer (where the splintering will occur), which helps control the splintering, then make a second cut through the rest of the wood. Support the cut, either along ...


3

Not all steel is quench hardening. I do not know that HSS or High Speed Steel (common wood tools) is easily hardened by this method. Typically, the cobalt and vanadium content makes this difficult. It can be done, but only by a controlled heating between 1260-1280°C, controlling the quench (or thoroughness of the heating) and then rapidly cooling, usually in ...


2

Most of the time they can be twisted onto one another and looped if you're careful. I gently twist a wire twist tie to hold them in shape. Then you can hang them up with less issues.


2

I kind of suppose the reason is that a hand-held router has to be light-ish, so can't have a big 1HP motor, and so the inertia and smaller chip size (therefore lower cutting force) produced by a high-rev cutter allows a small fractional horsepower motor to be used. FYI there are 1-2hp professional routers as well as production routers with motors in excess ...


2

Also, you could look at it that the milling machine runs slowly. It would be more productive to mill & drill at wood speeds, but the cutter would get too hot, hence the miserable cutting speeds of metalworking machines.


2

In my experience, trying to cut wood with a slowly spinning cutter results in a lot of tear-out when going cross-grain. I assume the reason is that unlike metal, wood is quite soft and flexible across the grain, but quite strong along the grain. This causes it to move out of the way of the cutting edge, instead of splitting cleanly. Having sharp router bits ...


2

I cannot count how much aluminum over the years I have cut with my Hitachi slide compound and a carbide blade that stayed on for a long time after using it to cut trim. No it did not trash the blade or dull it enough to make a bad cut, although the blade did eventually get dull over time but not from the aluminum in one sitting. To answer the question, the ...


2

Although the taper in the iron seems to be the primary cause of the problem here, in fact edges going out of square isn't at all uncommon after many cycles of honing. Most woodworkers, unless they've taken deliberate steps to avoid doing so, habitually bear down more strongly on one side than the other when honing and over time this tends to produce edges ...


2

For starters, your blade is too small. A 1/8" blade will have very high teeth per inch (TPI) and is intended primarily for finish work on small/thin pieces. It Taking a quick look at the video it appears that Steve is using a 3/8" or 1/2" blade. This blade size will handle the rough cut on the shapes required fairly easily. I would recommend a 3 - 6 TPI ...


1

Okay, (rubs hands together)... ready for an answer. I'll try to combine information from the comments (and will happily edit based on feedback if I've misconstrued anything). To your question specifically. The T101 blades (or a similar generic) will turn tight curves because of its thin back and cut fairly cleanly. Don't worry about the supposed 15mm depth ...


1

Is the “paper test” actually relevant to sharpening chisels and planes? No. As I think I mention in a previous Answer many edges can slice paper while still not being as sharp as you'd really like for some woodworking tasks1. Lots of the 'substitute tests' (anything that doesn't involve slicing wood) can fall short, although once you get to shaving sharp —...


1

If you bought the Plexiglas at a brick-and-mortar home improvement store, most will cut the material for you for free, or for at most a nominal fee. Our neighborhood Lowe's has a score-and-break rig all set up for this purpose.


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