12

One of the problems with putting wheels on a work bench, is it often isn't stable enough for some of the stuff we do on the bench (hand planing for instance). Rockler has a set of workbench casters that lock down to allow the bench to roll, but then can be popped up to put the bench back on its own legs for stability.


12

Wood stabilization typically refers to reinforcing wood against inherent defects or weaknesses. In turning, stabilization may mean anything from filling cracks with epoxy, to impregnating the wood with resin. More generally, you can stabilize a crack with a butterfly inlay or you can again use epoxy or some other filler. In the case of turning, the ...


6

Is there a design that doesn't have that problem and without making the foot-room situation worse Have you ever seen a folding walker? Here's a picture: The whole point of a walker is to support someone, so it needs to be stable in all directions. Lateral stability is provided by the parallel tubes in which the two frames pivot. You could use a similar ...


5

I would use bolts, if I remember correctly I used bolts to attach wheels to my table/cart that I made, 12-14 years ago and they are still going fine. I attached them to 2x4's that were a part of the lower frame structure. They don't need to be real big, but by having the bolt go though something (with a good washer on either end) you can prevent the 'easy' ...


5

Diagonally bracing the inner leg pair would help...


4

Based on a wobble going toward the black chair, then yes, the triangular braces between the table top and the legs will resolve the wobble. Smaller braces would be better from a design perspective, but if they're too small, they won't be sufficient to stop the wobble. It's difficult to tell, but it looks like there are small metal fasteners holding the ...


4

It depends on the wheels and load, and without more information on what exactly failed (wood? Screws? Wheel?) it will be hard to give you an answer specific to your problem. When I built my large worktable, I had 4x4 posts as legs, but they were still too small for the 500lb rated load wheels I wanted to use, so added 2x4's wrapped around the legs to end up ...


3

Basically, you're building a swing set for a single swing with a 200lb rider. The difference is that this swing can go a full 360° instead of just back-and-forth. Treating this as a "shelf" and using the Sagulator, I picked Eastern White Pine as an example of the standard type of "SPF" (spruce, pine, fir) that you're likely going to pick up at the local big ...


3

Are you going to be in an environment with large fluctuations of humidity and temperature, perhaps outside the range of comfortable human habitation? This is just a gut feeling, based on secondary experiences over time, but the combination you're suggesting has quite a bit going for it. The plywood is, of course, a series of laminations of wood, with grain ...


3

I would recommend constructing the center and right pieces as freestanding cabinets. that are built in your shop space and moved to position completed. That way they will have internal structural integrity adequate to support clothing and accessories. (Make sure they can be moved up stairs and along corridor turns before you build them). The hanging area ...


3

Support the bolt that you're using as an axle on both sides. In other words, don't cantilever the wheels. This will reduce the moment the bolt is applying to the wooden frame to effectively zero (it takes its "leverage" away).


3

When talking about stability, it is necessary to distinguish between structural stability and dimensional stability. The means for reinforcing spalted wood (plastic resins, butterfly inserts, etc) fall within the realm of establishing structural stability. During the 1970's a chemical means of maintaining dimensional stability using a warm solution of ...


3

I ran a span calculation for a 2x4 oak board at http://www.awc.org/codes-standards/calculators-software/spancalc using a 35psf live and dead load, the minimum setting available and got a result of 6 foot. Although this is a total load of 900lb., it should be noted that you could easily get several hundred lbs. on the top. I have a similar length long ...


2

The main thing that I can see (apart from the bracing being a bit overkill) is that you probably want some small braces at the top of the legs where they meet the apron / top, in order to stop sideways wobble. A bridle (not bridal) joint for the legs is probably a good choice of joint, but if you want this table to last for years and years then some side ...


2

wondering if my design is strong/structurally sound enough A torsion box is obviously very stiff and stable, and this would make for a very very strong table just as it does with workbenches constructed this way. But it's complete overkill for the kinds of loads a normal table would require, think about the much sparer structure of a standard 7' (2.13m) ...


2

When woodworkers talk about "stability" they are referring to the tendency of the wood to change shape. "Stablizing" wood means doing something to it that would prevent it from changing shape. Normally the biggest cause of instability is a loss (or gain) of moisture, causing part of the wood to shrink (or expand). This can lead to warping or twisting.


2

You need triangles. Triangles make all the difference and make things stronger. Something like this would make a huge difference, though it isn't ideal for a table you sit at. However braces on each leg to the base of the table would be ideal such as you can see in this picture. Without some kind of bracing you are going to have to live with wobble. ...


2

The short answer is "you are probably good to go" The more elaborate answer is "it depends" The depends part is based on the likely loading of the table top. An ideal tool for helping with the decision is Sagulator as @Graphus mentioned in his comment. Before you use Sagulator, realize that it is based on structural engineering principles and ...


2

First of all, the 110 pounds they say for that desk almost certainly is being very conservative, it will probably actually hold at least twice that. That being said, we can look at the ways it can fail and help mitigate each of those. Looking at the specs on that desk , the top material is probably the weak point. Putting a lot of weight over the middle ...


2

You could stiffen them up by nailing or screwing a 1/2" x 1" or 3/4" x 1 1/2" hardwood strip across the underside of the front edge of each shelf.


2

As clarified in the Comments, the back panel is thick enough MDF that fastening in through from the back is viable and that alone will do quite a bit to resist any tendency towards sagging. If you want to stiffen the shelves still further there are various established ways of doing this for plywood that could be adopted here, e.g. the below: But the ...


2

It's unclear if this question fits within the purview of "woodworking", and we are only guessing that you are asking "will this walnut stave top split under load or because of fasteners?" With that in mind: The table is fine. It isn't going anywhere under a static load twice what you've put on it. If you attached the legs with appropriate ...


2

To maintain current size there are few options. The existing system we must guess was good enough when the table was new. Perhaps screws got loose and were not tightened? And the pocket screws appear to be short! Because the legs are so thick these screws could be double previous length I think. Deepen pilot holes if you add longer screws. Unless corner ...


1

The structure I designed below seems stable enough on paper... I would disagree with your appraisal. For clarity I refer to the direction of the triangular base pieces as 'front/back' and the overhead beam as 'side to side'. While the triangles give the structure stability front to back, there is little to no bracing side to side. All the stress of the ...


1

Your suggestion of diagonal braces is spot-on. You'll get the best results by having two braces spaced as far apart as practical. This will triangulate the structure as completely as you can. It doesn't matter if the bracing looks like the letter "W" or the letter "M" when viewed from the side. That decision should be based on how you expect your feet to be ...


1

Can one laminate an MDF panel to plywood and still maintain dimensional stability? I'm not sure why would you might have thought that combining two dimensionally stable products would somehow introduce an instability. If you think about plywood itself, this is layers of wood veneers that aren't dimensionally stable but when glued together you get something ...


1

Large (1/4" x 2" or bigger - personally I'd probably go 3/8" x 3") lag bolts with washers. You'll definitely want to drill pilot holes and will probably need an impact driver to get them in. Or drill clearance holes and use a bolt, washer, washer, and nut. Since it's outside make sure all hardware is galvanized or stainless. Also, you'll probably want to ...


1

I can see two ways this table could fail under load. Either the leg joints could fail (resulting in either racking or the legs splaying) or the surface could bow and break. For the first issue, I would reinforce the joints by adding diagonal braces going from the legs to the top. I'd probably try two braces from each leg, 4-6" away from the joint. This ...


1

Well, if this were a woodworking question, which it should have been, there are a few standard answers: 1) Add an apron, i.e. a frame of boards surrounding the table just below the top. These often have drawers in them. 2) Add eight corbels around the base of the table. These are small braces often make to look decorative. They are surprisingly ...


1

Designing a house is a complicated problem. Normally builders learn by experience and start from established designs. There are a lot of problems that cannot be solved just by using a simple equation. Only long experience is sufficient to know. If you make a new design, the likelihood will be that, unless the design is very simple, some error will be made ...


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